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When you have to loop through a collection and make a string of each data separated by a delimiter, you always end up with an extra delimiter at the end, e.g.

for(String serverId : serverIds) {
 sb.append(serverId);
 sb.append(",");
}

Gives something like : serverId_1, serverId_2, serverId_3,

I would like to delete the last character in the StringBuilder (without converting it because I still need it after this loop).

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2  
why not joining strings ? –  sly7_7 Aug 3 '10 at 9:50
4  
If by joining strings you mean "string concatenation", it depends on the number of strings and their lengths. Using a string builder is more efficient if you are going to be hammering in a lot of strings regardless of their size since strings are immutable. Every time you concatenate strings together you are creating a new resultant string (which is really a char array). String builders are essentially a list of char that doesn't become an immutable string until you call the toString() method. –  dyslexicanaboko Jul 23 '12 at 0:19

10 Answers 10

up vote 179 down vote accepted

Others have pointed out the deleteCharAt method, but here's another alternative approach:

String prefix = "";
for (String serverId : serverIds) {
  sb.append(prefix);
  prefix = ",";
  sb.append(serverId);
}

Alternatively, use the Joiner class from Guava :)

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1  
yes, I think this gonna be a more sophisticated solution –  Neel Aug 3 '10 at 9:53
2  
@Coronatus: No, because "" is the absence of any characters, not a single character. –  Jon Skeet Aug 28 '10 at 9:28
9  
won't executing prefix=","; every loop cycle affect performance? –  Harish Oct 24 '11 at 10:10
6  
@Harish: Possibly, a tiny, tiny bit - very unlikely to be significant though. –  Jon Skeet Oct 24 '11 at 10:14
4  
Apache Commons does have another alternative to Guava's Joiner too in their StringUtils. commons.apache.org/proper/commons-lang/javadocs/api-2.6/org/…, java.lang.String) –  GoRoS Sep 28 '13 at 16:50

Another simple solution is:

sb.setLength(sb.length() - 1);

This assumes that sb.length() > 0 ... i.e. there is a "last character" to remove. If you can't make that assumption, and/or you can't deal with the exception that would ensue if the assumption is incorrect, then check the StringBuilder's length first; e.g.

// Readable version
if (sb.length() > 0) {
   sb.setLength(sb.length() - 1);
}

or

// Concise but hard-to-read version.
sb.setLength(Math.max(sb.length() - 1, 0));
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5  
Very nice solution. Lowest impact on performance and least code required :) –  Alain O'Dea Sep 6 '12 at 14:13
3  
Check for sb.length() > 0 to avoid StringIndexOutOfBoundsException –  fglez Jan 10 at 3:39
    
@fglez - This solution is designed for use-cases there that check is not necessary, or where a SIOOBE is an acceptable outcome. Adding the check means that this is no longer a "simple solution". –  Stephen C Jan 10 at 3:44
    
Small fix with your parenthesis: sb.setLength(Math.max((sb.length() - 1), 0)); -> As I copy pasted that the compiler couldnt parse it without the extra parenthesis. –  Louis Papaloizou Aug 22 at 7:02
    
@LouisPapaloizou - a better fix is to remove a ')' ... which I've done. Thanks. –  Stephen C Aug 22 at 7:13

You can use:

string finalString=sb.Remove(sb.Length - 1, 1).ToString();
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The Question is about Java. This is NOT Java code .... –  Stephen C Mar 5 at 3:21

Yet another solution similar to the "prefix" solution above avoids multiple prefix assignments in the loop. i.e. Just in case the optimizer does not unroll the first loop iteration.

    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
    boolean firstEntry = true;
    for (String serverId : serverIds) {
      if (firstEntry)
        firstEntry = false;
      else
        sb.append(",");      
      sb.append(serverId);
    }
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Another alternative

for(String serverId : serverIds) {
   sb.append(",");
   sb.append(serverId); 
}
sb.deleteCharAt(0);
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Should be better than removing the last char as this requires size calculations. Unless removing the first char causes data to be moved around... –  slott Jul 17 '13 at 11:01
StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder();
sb.append("abcdef");
sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length() - 1);
assertEquals("abcde",sb.toString());
// true
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1  
FYI, the 1st argument to assertEquals is the expected result. Very historical. –  Gray Sep 7 '11 at 16:43
    
that's true, it's fixed ! –  Antoine Jul 10 '12 at 7:58

In this case,

sb.setLength(sb.length() - 1);

is preferable as it just assign the last value to '\0' whereas deleting last character does System.arraycopy

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The setLength call is not assigning anything to the last value. Java string buffers are not null/zero terminated. In fact, setLength is simply updating a length field. –  Stephen C Sep 19 '12 at 11:23
    
@Rohit Reddy Korrapolu: But the arraycopy copies 0 elements, so I guess it can get optimized away. –  maaartinus Nov 3 '13 at 13:04
    
If the newLength argument is greater than or equal to the current length, sufficient null characters ('\u0000') are appended so that length becomes the newLength argument. Which is not the case. –  fglez Jan 10 at 3:47

Yet another alternative:

public String join(Collection<String> collection, String seperator) {
    if (collection.isEmpty()) return "";

    Iterator<String> iter = collection.iterator();
    StringBuilder sb = new StringBuilder(iter.next());
    while (iter.hasNext()) {
        sb.append(seperator);
        sb.append(iter.next());
    }

    return sb.toString();
}
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Alternatively,

StringBuilder result = new StringBuilder();
    for(String string : collection) {
        result.append(string);
        result.append(",");
    }
    return result.substring(0, result.length() - 1) ;
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Usable as you can add a "." at the end. –  artfullyContrived Oct 26 '11 at 9:28
sb.deleteCharAt(sb.length()-1) 
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3  
Hm ... I missed the delete functions in the javadoc ! aha ) I'm used to look for "remove" Thanks ! –  Matthew Aug 3 '10 at 9:46
8  
This gets upvoted too much but its not efficient, it does a system.arraycopy. What @Rohit Reddy Korrapolu said. –  Andreas Sep 19 '12 at 11:05
3  
It is unsafe for sb.length() == 0 also –  Matthias Aug 9 '13 at 11:41

protected by Stephen C Aug 22 at 7:10

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