Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm trying to be able to write an extensible grammar using functions, but can't seem to find the right syntax for accepting a template function. I'm using Visual C++ 2008. It will accept a variable of the same type as the template function, or a similar non-template function, but not the template function itself.

Error 1 error C2679: binary '<<' : no operator found which takes a right-hand operand of type 'overloaded-function' (or there is no acceptable conversion) ( line *** )

class Grammar {
    friend Grammar operator << ( const Grammar& lhs, const char* rhs ) {
        return lhs; // append rhs to grammar
    }
    template<typename T>
    friend Grammar operator << ( const Grammar& lhs, T (*rhs) () ) {
        return lhs; // append rhs() to grammar
    }
};

template<typename T>
class ExpressionParticle {
};

template<typename T>
ExpressionParticle<T> Expression () ;

ExpressionParticle<int> ExpressionInt ();

int _tmain ( int argc, _TCHAR *argv[] )
{
    ExpressionParticle<int> (*p)();

    p = Expression<int>;

    Grammar() << "p";
    Grammar() << p;
    Grammar() << ExpressionInt;
    Grammar() << Expression<int>; // ***

What is the type of Expression<int> if it is not the type of p in above? How is its type different to the type of ExpressionInt.

share|improve this question
    
FWIW, this compiles with g++ 4.4.1 –  anon Aug 3 '10 at 10:16

3 Answers 3

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Your code looks OK to me, and g++ is fine with that too. This seems to be weird overload resolution bug in Visual Studio. VS2005 seems to have the same problem. A possible workaround is (tested with VS2005):

template<class T>
T id(T t)  {return t; }
int main ()
{
    ExpressionParticle<int> (*p)();

    p = Expression<int>;

    Grammar() << "p";
    Grammar() << p;
    Grammar() << ExpressionInt;
    Grammar() << id(Expression<int>); // ***
}
share|improve this answer

Change this:

class Grammar {
    friend Grammar operator << ( const Grammar& lhs, const char* rhs ) {
        return lhs; // append rhs to grammar
    }
    template<typename T>
    friend Grammar operator << ( const Grammar& lhs, T (*rhs) () ) {
        return lhs; // append rhs() to grammar
    }
};

to this:

class Grammar {
public:
    Grammar& operator << ( const char* rhs ) {
        return *this; // append rhs to grammar
    }
    template<typename T>
    Grammar& operator << ( const T &rhs) {
        return *this; // append rhs() to grammar
    }
};
share|improve this answer
    
Grammar() << Expression<int>(); has a completely different meaning. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 3 '10 at 10:55
    
ah!... my bad.. i didn't notice that part of it. But the way he overloaded the operator << was wrong, IMO. I'll change that now. –  Vite Falcon Aug 3 '10 at 10:58
    
@Luther I'm sorry.. but wat's the completely different meaning of Expression<int>(); again? It's a template-function and the function should be called like a function. Isn't it? I worked it out in Visual Studio 2008 and it does compile it! –  Vite Falcon Aug 3 '10 at 11:07
1  
He wants the function pointer Expression<int> not the result from calling Expression<int>. Apparently he wants to call the function later to produce some side effects. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 3 '10 at 11:12

As another work-around, I was able to get it to work on VS2010 by casting. I used the typedef for convenience. VS2008 probably will work the same.

int _tmain ( int argc, _TCHAR *argv[] )
{
   typedef ExpressionParticle< int > (*FCN)();

   ExpressionParticle<int> (*p)() = Expression<int>; 

   Grammar() << "p"; 
   Grammar() << p; 
   Grammar() << ExpressionInt; 
   Grammar() << static_cast< FCN >( Expression<int> );
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.