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I have a table in my Mysql database, which is used for authentication. And now, I need to make the authentication case sensitive. Googling around, I have realized Mysql columns are case insensitive (contrary to Oracle) for search operations and the default behavior can be changed while creating the table by specifying the "binary" ie.

CREATE TABLE USERS
(
    USER_ID SMALLINT UNSIGNED NOT NULL AUTO_INCREMENT,
    USER_NAME VARCHAR(50) BINARY NOT NULL
)

Can someone please tell me how to alter the table in Mysql to add the "Binary" to an existing column of a DB?

Thanks!

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4 Answers 4

up vote 11 down vote accepted
ALTER TABLE USERS CHANGE USER_NAME USER_NAME VARCHAR(50) BINARY NOT NULL;
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2  
Don't need to list column name twice if it isn't being changed ;) –  defines Aug 3 '10 at 12:25
6  
To quote the mysql documentation dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.1/en/alter-table.html, "If you want to change a column's type but not the name, CHANGE syntax still requires an old and new column name, even if they are the same." –  deinst Aug 3 '10 at 12:33

Please see http://dev.mysql.com/doc/refman/5.0/en/charset-conversion.html

Example:

ALTER TABLE some_table MODIFY some_column BLOB;
ALTER TABLE some_table MODIFY some_column VARCHAR(50) BINARY;

The first line converts to a binary data type (attempt to minimize character loss) and the second converts back to the VARCHAR type with BINARY collation.

It may actually be preferable to store as one of the binary types (BLOB, BINARY, or VARBINARY) rather than simply collating BINARY. I would suggest you compare a bit, your mileage may vary depending on your actual data and the queries you need to run.

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You should be able to do something like this:

Edit: Misread what you intended to do:

ALTER TABLE USERS MODIFY
    USER_NAME VARCHAR(50)
      CHARACTER SET latin1
      COLLATE latin1_bin;
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The following worked for me: ALTER TABLE UserAccounts CHANGE Password Password varchar(50) NOT NULL COLLATE utf8_bin; –  Chris Prince Feb 13 at 19:16

Rather than altering your table, you can still perform case sensitive queries on your table when authenticating, use the BINARY option as follows:

SELECT BINARY * FROM USERS where USER_ID = 2 AND USER_NAME = 'someone' LIMIT 1;

Does this help?

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Based on the above, a user name of SomeOne will return false. –  SimonDowdles Aug 3 '10 at 12:12
4  
This adds a significant overhead to every single query. If the data must always be returned binary why convert it on every single access? That is what we call "kludge". –  defines Aug 3 '10 at 12:17
    
Perhaps I am not understanding, will the following statement mean a case SENSITIVE check in the future? ALTER TABLE USERS CHANGE USER_NAME USER_NAME VARCHAR(50) BINARY NOT NULL; As far as I understood each and every login authentication needed to be case sensitive. –  SimonDowdles Aug 3 '10 at 12:21
    
Thanks everyone for the response, yes I managed to do it using the ALTER syntax provided by you guys. I was getting confused looking at the charset in the syntax, of the MySQL manual. –  PaiS Aug 3 '10 at 18:24

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