Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have next code:

private T CreateInstance<T>(object obj) // where T : ISomeInterface, class
{
    ...

    if (!typeof(T).IsAssignableFrom(obj.GetType())) { throw ..; }

    return (T)obj;
}

Can it be replaced with this:

T result = obj as T;

if (result == null) { throw ..; }

return result;

If not - why?

share|improve this question
    
Where did bar come from? –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 12:59
    
You fixed... you had bar as T .... –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 13:06
    
If you're going to throw anyway, why not just return (T)obj ; –  Anton Tykhyy Aug 3 '10 at 13:15
    
@Anton: I will return only in case if obj is T, other way I throw an exception –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 13:30
    
You have already took part in the same discussion stackoverflow.com/questions/686412/c-is-operator-performance/… :) –  garik Aug 3 '10 at 13:44

11 Answers 11

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Another variant:

private T CreateInstance<T>(object obj) where T : ISomeInterface // as OP mentioned above
{
    ...

    T result = obj as T;
    if (result == null)
        { throw ..; }
    else 
       return result;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Exactly what I mean! –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 13:07
    
Pity it won't compile. Did you try this? –  Daniel Dyson Aug 3 '10 at 13:08
    
Why would you not want to check the type before you cast? –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 13:09
    
@Daniel: It just isn't compilable without a class constraint –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 13:12
    
@Daniel Dyson: of cause no. "throw ..;" doesn't allowed by C# compiler –  Denis Palnitsky Aug 3 '10 at 13:15

What about if (!(bar is T)) { throw ..; }

Alternatively if you don't need your own exception message the simplest answer is just to do:

return (T)obj;

The reason if that if it's not castable an InvalidCastException will be thrown and the return ignored. Unless you're adding some more logic or a custom error message there's no need to do a check and throw your own exception.

share|improve this answer

Yes you can use your as operator code there instead of the original code, so long as T is a reference type or nullable.

as is the recommended way of casting in C# (see item 3 of Effective C#, by Bill Wagner)

From system.type.isassignablefrom:

[returns] true if c and the current Type represent the same type, or if the current Type is in the inheritance hierarchy of c, or if the current Type is an interface that c implements, or if c is a generic type parameter and the current Type represents one of the constraints of c. false if none of these conditions are true, or if c is null.

From 7.10.11 of the C# spec:

In an operation of the form E as T, E must be an expression and T must be a reference type, a type parameter known to be a reference type, or a nullable type

So you can see that they do comparable checks.

share|improve this answer
    
This doesn't compile if T is not constrained to be a class –  BlueMonkMN Aug 3 '10 at 13:28
    
@BlueMonkMN: yea, class or nullable –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 13:30
    
That'll teach me for not reading the OP properly. Edited –  Matt Ellen Aug 3 '10 at 13:36

Maybe this (less brackets, better readability)

if (obj is T)
{
    return (T)obj;
}
else
   throw new ...

EDITED by reduced number of brackets I originally meant inverted check: ie

if (obj is T)

instead of

if (!(obj is T))

so final version can be

if (obj is T)
{
    return (T)obj;
}

throw new ...

or

if (obj is T)
{
    return (T)obj;
}
else
{
   throw new ...
}
share|improve this answer
2  
More error prone, when you omit brackets on else. –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 13:07
    
More error prone, because it makes the slightest bit of sense to insert another line of code after a throw statement? –  Joel Mueller Aug 3 '10 at 16:23

See this post

The second one is safe...because at the first one if obj is null you will get exception (obj.GetType() --> NullReferenceException).

When you place "is" and then "as" is cause performance issues..

share|improve this answer
    
I think he might need to add some Constraints but isn't that what he is trying to accomplish? If T can be this type... cast it? –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 13:05

The class constraint where T : class allows you to use the as T statement.

private T CreateInstance<T>(object obj) where T : class
{
    if (!(obj is T)) { throw new ArgumentException("..."); }
    return obj as T;
}

or

private T CreateInstance<T>(object obj)
{
    if (!(obj is T)) { throw new ArgumentException("..."); }
    return (T)obj;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Everything right except that it's better to use either is or as but not together. Double operation without sense. –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 14:01
    
True. I have updated my answer to reflect this. Thanks @abatishchev –  Daniel Dyson Aug 3 '10 at 14:10
    
MSDN recommends next: T result = obj as T; if (result != null ) { } else { }. Like @Orsol's answer. Or yours - if : class constraint isn't available –  abatishchev Aug 3 '10 at 14:20
    
Yes. All of these will work just fine. Looks like you might have answered your own question. –  Daniel Dyson Aug 3 '10 at 14:28

You're probably looking for the is keyword, with the syntax expression is type

Documentation describes it as performing the checks you want:

An is expression evaluates to true if both of the following conditions are met:

• expression is not null.

• expression can be cast to type. That is, a cast expression of the form (type)(expression) will complete without throwing an exception.

Edit However, if instead of just working out whether you can cast something before you try, the as keyword is probably your best solution as you describe in your post.

The following code would perform the same function though...

try
{
    T result = (T)obj;
    return result;
}
catch (InvalidCastException ex)
{
     // throw your own exception or deal with it in some other way.
}

Which method you prefer is up to you...

share|improve this answer

IsAssignableFrom used by this scene:

foreach (PropertyInfo property in GetType().GetProperties())
{
    if (typeof(SubPresenter).IsAssignableFrom(property.PropertyType))
    {//Do Sth.}
}
share|improve this answer

Just for the developers who like to play the numbers game (who doesn't!).

Below you'll find a performance comparison test for IsAssignableFrom vs. As. Of course this will only count if you have an instance.

The result of the test (one million attempts):

IsAssignableFrom: 146 ms elapsed

AsOperator: 7 ms elapsed

[TestMethod]
public void IsAssignableFromVsAsPerformanceTest()
{
    Stopwatch stopwatch = new Stopwatch();
    stopwatch.Start();

    int attempts = 1000000;
    string value = "This is a test";

    for (int attempt = 0; attempt < attempts; attempt++) {
        bool isConvertible = typeof(IConvertible).IsAssignableFrom(value.GetType());
    }

    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("IsAssignableFrom: {0} ms elapsed", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);

    stopwatch.Restart();

    for (int attempt = 0; attempt < attempts; attempt++) {
        bool isConvertible = value as string != null;
    }

    stopwatch.Stop();
    Console.WriteLine("AsOperator: {0} ms elapsed", stopwatch.ElapsedMilliseconds);
}
share|improve this answer

It may have been intended to handle cases where a conversion constructor would allow the operation, but apparently IsAssignableFrom doesn't handle that either. Don't see anything that can handle that. So I don't see how to check for cases like this:

class Program
{
  static void Main(string[] args)
  {
     B bValue = new B(123);
     Console.WriteLine(typeof(A).IsAssignableFrom(bValue.GetType()));
     //Console.WriteLine(bValue is A);
     //Console.WriteLine(bValue as A == null);
     A aValue = bValue;
     Console.WriteLine(aValue.ToString());
  }
}

class A
{
  string value;
  public A(string value)
  {
     this.value = value;
  }
  public override string ToString()
  {
     return value;
  }
}

class B
{
  int value;

  public B(int value)
  {
     this.value = value;
  }

  public static implicit operator A(B value)
  {
     return new A(value.value.ToString());
  }
}

In the end, I don't see any reason why you wouldn't want to use your version of the code, unless you want the code to throw an exception when obj is null. That's the only difference I can see. obj.GetType() will throw an null reference exception when obj is null instead of throwing the specified exception.

Edit: I see now your version of the code will not compile if T can be a value type, but the other suggested solution like "if (obj is T) return (T)obj;" will compile. So I see why your suggested alternative will not work, but I don't see why you couldn't use "is".

share|improve this answer
    
I don't understand why people vote answers down without explaining the problem. What's the point? We don't learn anything from a down vote if nobody explains the problem. –  BlueMonkMN Jul 28 '11 at 11:03

Or even better because its easer to read true conditionals.

 if(obj is T){
    //Create instance. 
 }
 else{
    throw new InvalidArgumentException("Try Again");
 }
share|improve this answer
3  
When you place "is" and then "as" is cause performance issues... stackoverflow.com/questions/686412/c-is-operator-performance/… –  garik Aug 3 '10 at 13:28
    
Really? Performance is not in question here? He is not asking what is the fastest way to do it. –  Nix Aug 3 '10 at 14:23

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.