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For example, I have 4800 and I would like to see all the factors of this number.

 # num = the number you want factors of

 def factors_of(num)
    (1..num).collect { |n| [n, num/n] if ((num/n) * n) == num}.compact
 end

divisors_of(4800) => [[1, 4800], [2, 2400], [3, 1600], [4, 1200], [5, 960], [6, 800], [8, 600], [10, 480], [12, 400], [15, 320], [16, 300], [20, 240], [24, 200], [25, 192], [30, 160], [32, 150], [40, 120], [48, 100], [50, 96], [60, 80], [64, 75], [75, 64], [80, 60], [96, 50], [100, 48], [120, 40], [150, 32], [160, 30], [192, 25], [200, 24], [240, 20], [300, 16], [320, 15], [400, 12], [480, 10], [600, 8], [800, 6], [960, 5], [1200, 4], [1600, 3], [2400, 2], [4800, 1]]

How would you do this in ruby or any language?

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3  
Wrong terminology. What you are looking for are factors –  Michael Borgwardt Aug 3 '10 at 15:41
    
ok, yeah it's factors not integers. –  s84 Aug 3 '10 at 15:59
3  
@Michael Borgwardt: No, he's looking specifically for divisors. Although it is probably true that the best way to solve this problem is to find the factors (first), and the generate divisors from factors (second). –  AnT Aug 3 '10 at 18:56
6  
@Beta, @AndreyT, @Vatine: I've never heard of the convention that "factors" means "prime factors"; it's always synonymous with "divisors". Can you give a citation for this convention? (If it were so, why would we need the adjective "prime"?) –  ShreevatsaR Aug 5 '10 at 6:14
5  
For context, I'm an American who studied math at an American college. In my experience, I would expect someone to say "prime factors" if that is what they meant. Factors are not necessarily prime, regardless of British/American English. –  Greg May 29 '13 at 21:04

10 Answers 10

up vote 27 down vote accepted

In Ruby, the prime library gives you the factorization:

require 'prime'
4800.prime_division #=> [[2, 6], [3, 1], [5, 2]]

To get that list of yours, you take the cartesian product of the possible powers:

require 'prime'
def factors_of(number)
  primes, powers = number.prime_division.transpose
  exponents = powers.map{|i| (0..i).to_a}
  divisors = exponents.shift.product(*exponents).map do |powers|
    primes.zip(powers).map{|prime, power| prime ** power}.inject(:*)
  end
  divisors.sort.map{|div| [div, number / div]}
end

p factors_of(4800) # => [[1, 4800], [2, 2400], ..., [4800, 1]]

Note: In Ruby 1.8.7, you must require 'mathn' instead of require 'prime'. In Ruby 1.8.6, require 'backports/1.8.7/enumerable/inject' or modify the inject above...

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Great. This sort of solution — e.g. for number=12, doing (2^0, 2^1, 2^2) x (3^0, 3^1) — is much faster for large (esp. composite) numbers than the code in the question. Ruby looks cool! –  ShreevatsaR Aug 3 '10 at 16:42
3  
Can someone explain the factors_of in a math way? –  oppih May 26 '13 at 15:44

I think this solution is nicer, especially because it doesn't perform so many loops, it doesn't require the Prime library and most importantly it runs til Math.sqrt(n). Here's the code:

class Integer
  def factors
    1.upto(Math.sqrt(self)).select {|i| (self % i).zero?}.inject([]) do |f, i| 
      f << i
      f << self / i unless i == self / i
      f
  end.sort
end

# Usage
4800.factors

If you want to pair them up, just like in your example, you can use the following piece of code (which pairs up first with last and in case there's an odd number of factors, then the middle one is the square root):

class Integer
  def paired_up_factors
    a = self.factors
    l = a.length
    if l % 2 == 0
      a[0, l / 2].zip(a[- l / 2, l / 2].reverse)
    else
      a[0, l / 2].zip(a[- l / 2 + 1, l / 2].reverse) + [a[l / 2], a[l / 2]]
    end
  end
end

# Usage
4800.paired_up_factors
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You have a bug. irb(main):026:0> 64.paired_up_factors => [[1, 64], [2, 32], [4, 16], 8, 8] last set should be [8,8] –  EnabrenTane Mar 13 '14 at 22:59
 def divisors_of(num)
   (1..num).select { |n|num % n == 0}
 end
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You could also do an O(sqrt(n)) algorithm that does not need prime factorization. If you see at your list, for every pair [a, b] in your list such that a <= b, the pair [b, a] also appears. This allows you to iterate only up to sqrt(n), because a <= sqrt(n).

To prove that for every pair [a, b] such that a <= b it holds that a <= sqrt(n) you can use a proof by contradiction. Let's assume that a > sqrt(n). If a > sqrt(n), then b > sqrt(n) too, because b >= a. Therefore:

a * b > sqrt(n) * sqrt(n) = n

which contradicts the fact that a * b == n. So the following the algorithm will generate all pairs (the following code is in C++):

void GeneratePairs(int n) {
  for (int a = 1; a <= n / a; ++a)
    if (n % a == 0) {
      const int b = n / a;
      printf("[%d, %d] ", a, b);
      if (a != b)  // be careful with square numbers
        printf("[%d, %d] ", b, a);
    }
  printf("\n");
}

The only issue is that this code does not generate the pairs in order. One solution is to store them in a vector, sort them and then print them, or doing two passes, one forward and one backwards:

void GeneratePairsTwoPasses(int n) {
  const int sq = static_cast<int>(sqrt(n));
  for (int a = 1; a <= sq; ++a)
    if (n % a == 0)
      printf("[%d, %d] ", a, n / a);
  for (int a = sq - 1; a >= 1; --a)
    if (n % a == 0)
      printf("[%d, %d] ", n / a, a);
  printf("\n");
}
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The question doesn't really ask about the results of the divisions, and you can call product by converting array of arrays to array parameters.

n= 4800
pd= n.prime_division.map{ |pd| (0..pd[1]).map{ |i| pd[0]** i } }
p (pd.length== 1 ? pd[0] : pd[0].product(*pd.drop(1)).map{ |a, b| a* b })[0..-2].uniq
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In Haskell, any of these two:

import Control.Monad

factorsOf :: (Integral a) => a -> [(a,a)]
factorsOf n = [(x,n `div` x) | x <- [1..n], n `mod` x == 0]

factorsOf_ :: (Integral a) => a -> [(a,a)]
factorsOf_ n = do
    x <- [1..n]
    guard (n `mod` x == 0)
    return (x, n `div` x)
share|improve this answer
    
This does trial division by every integer up to n, which is extremely inefficient for large n. –  ShreevatsaR Aug 5 '10 at 19:55
    
Yep. You should definetely not use this code if performance is an issue. :) –  keiter Aug 6 '10 at 23:31
    
The OP is asking for Ruby. How does Haskell help him? –  Mohamad Dec 23 '14 at 17:04

Python doesn't come with batteries to do the factorisation, but starting with

>>> p=[[2, 6], [3, 1], [5, 2]]

>>> from itertools import product
>>> print sorted(reduce(lambda x,y:x*y,j) for j in product(*[[x**i for i in range(0,y+1)] for x,y in p]))
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 8, 10, 12, 15, 16, 20, 24, 25, 30, 32, 40, 48, 50, 60, 64, 75, 80, 96, 100, 120, 150, 160, 192, 200, 240, 300, 320, 400, 480, 600, 800, 960, 1200, 1600, 2400, 4800]
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The question is about Ruby. Not python. –  Mohamad Dec 23 '14 at 17:04
    
@Mohamad, What does "or any language" mean to you then? –  John La Rooy Dec 24 '14 at 9:32
    
Fair enough, but the question should be tagged language agnostic, not Ruby. –  Mohamad Dec 24 '14 at 11:54

In F#:

let factors n = [for i in 1..n do if n%i=0 then yield i]

Other language implementations can be found here at Rosetta Code.

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2  
Not sure why this answer was given when the question asked for Ruby. –  Ben Lakey May 19 '14 at 1:44
def divisors(n)
  divisors = [] => Initialize an empty array where we store our divisors
  for i in 1..n
    divisors.push([i,n-i]) if n % i == 0 => Only pushes if i is a divisor of n
  end
  divisors => returns our array
end
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Using brute force, you can skip half of the numbers, since for n, numbers greater than n / 2 obviously can't be divisors, so to speed up calculation, you can go from n to n / 2 and then just add n itself. I've also added .uniq for n = 1 case:

((1..(n / 2.0).ceil).select { |i| n % i == 0 } + [n]).uniq
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