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I have the following string in a file and want to truncate the string to no more than 6 char. how to do that using regular expression in perl?
the original file is:

cat shortstring.in:

<value>1234@google.com</value>
<value>1235@google.com</value>

I want to get file as:
cat shortstring.out

<value>1234@g</value>
<value>1235@g</value>

I have a code as follows, is there any more efficient way than using
s/<value>(\w\w\w\w\w\w)(.*)/$1/;?

Here is a part of my code:

    while (<$input_handle>) {                        # take one input line at a time
            chomp;
            if (/(\d+@google.com)/) {
                    s/(<value>\w\w\w\w\w\w)(.*)</value>/$1/;
                    print $output_handle "$_\n";
              } else {
              print $output_handle "$_\n";
            }
    }
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1  
@ is not a word character so isn't matched by \w. Also, I think you don't mean to remove the <value> part? –  ysth Aug 3 '10 at 19:28

5 Answers 5

Use this instead (regex is not the only feature of Perl and it's overkill for this: :-)

$str = substr($str, 0, 6);

http://perldoc.perl.org/functions/substr.html

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1  
+1 for reminding me that regex is not the only feature of Perl .-) –  Alois Mahdal Mar 6 '12 at 22:17
$ perl -pe 's/(<value>[^<]{1,6})[^<]*/$1/' shortstring.in
<value>1234@g</value>
<value>1235@g</value>

In the context of the snippet from your question, use

while (<$input_handle>) {
  s!(<value>)(.*?)(</value>)!$1 . substr($2,0,6) . $3!e
    if /(\d+\@google\.com)/;
  print $output_handle $_;
}

or to do it with a single pattern

while (<$input_handle>) {
   s!(<value>)(\d+\@google\.com)(</value>)!$1 . substr($2,0,6) . $3!e;
  print $output_handle $_;
}

Using bangs as the delimiters on the substitution operator prevents Leaning Toothpick Syndrome in </value>.

NOTE: The usual warnings about “parsing” XML with regular expressions apply.

Demo program:

#! /usr/bin/perl

use warnings;
use strict;

my $input_handle = \*DATA;
open my $output_handle, ">&=", \*STDOUT or die "$0: open: $!";

while (<$input_handle>) {
   s!(<value>)(\d+\@google\.com)(</value>)!$1 . substr($2,0,6) . $3!e;
  print $output_handle $_;
}

__DATA__
<value>1234@google.com</value>
<value>1235@google.com</value>
<value>12@google.com</value>

Output:

$ ./prog.pl 
<value>1234@g</value>
<value>1235@g</value>
<value>12@goo</value>
share|improve this answer
    
I think my code is not correct, I only want to truncate the data between <value></value> –  user399517 Aug 3 '10 at 19:30
2  
Why do you think it's not correct? –  Paul Tomblin Aug 3 '10 at 19:31
    
your does not work. finally I use this: s/(<value>.{1,$truncate_num}).*(<.*)/$1$2/; –  user399517 Aug 4 '10 at 0:07
    
@gbacon thanks for the updated s!!!e sytnax. Someone else had posted then deleted that, but it didn't include the "<value>" tags. Had never used s!!!e before and was curious on how that would have looked if done correctly. –  David Blevins Aug 4 '10 at 0:10
    
@David Perl is flexible about the delimiters on the s/// operator. Using bangs meant I didn't have to escape the slash in </value>. –  Greg Bacon Aug 4 '10 at 1:47

Try this:

s|(?<=<value>)(.*?)(?=</value>)|substr $1,0,6|e;
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Looks like you want to truncate the text inside the tag which could be shorter than 6 characters already, in which case:

s/(<value>[^<]{1,6})[^<]*/$1/
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s/<value>(.{1,6}).*/<value>$1</value>/;
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With the . in (.{1,6}) you could get stuff like '123</v' –  David Blevins Aug 3 '10 at 19:49
    
@David, no, because he's already tested to make sure the tag has @google.com, so it can't be smaller than that. If you want to more careful, you could test for the closing tag, but since parsing xml or html in a regex is a REALLY REALLY BAD IDEA anyway, I don't want to give him any ideas. –  Paul Tomblin Aug 3 '10 at 20:37

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