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I learned how to access by reference in another answer on stackoverflow, but cannot find it again. Anyways, is the following method unsafe or at all unreliable?

protected function checkVar($requestType, $varname, $checkIfNumber = false)
{
    switch($requestType)
    {
        case 'GET':
            $sg = &$_GET;
            break;
        case 'POST':
            $sg = &$_POST;
            break;
        default:
            throw new Exception('Variable `$requestType` is not `GET` or `POST` in AController::checkVar().');
    }

    if(!isset($sg[$varname])) {
        throw new Exception("$requestType variable [$varname] is not set in AController::checkVar().");
    } else if(empty($sg[$varname])) {
        throw new Exception("$requestType variable [$varname] is empty in AController::checkVar().");
    } else  if($checkIfNumber) {
        if(!ctype_digit($sg[$varname])) {
            throw new Exception("$requestType variable [$varname] is not a number in AController::checkVar().");
        }
    }   

    return $sg[$varname];
}
share|improve this question
    
Im not understanding the point of this function but as is I do not see much of a problem aside from the mixing of POST and GET in the same function. You will want to be careful that a user cannot just toss some=extra&data=onto&your=function without you knowing it. :-) –  Chris Aug 4 '10 at 1:43
    
@Chris - Thanks for responding. My reason for creating this function is to limit the amount of code being repeated when checking variables that are sent via GET and POST. Your warning about the extra data is great, I'll look over the function again with this in mind. –  Mike Moore Aug 4 '10 at 1:46

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

This is not how you should use references. A 'copy' operation is actually cheaper as long as the values don't change, and there is no reference needed here (especially as you're not returning by reference, but actually making a copy). The only thing references in this point of the code can do is cause obscure errors later on which can be quite hard to track down.

share|improve this answer
    
Interesting that it is cheaper! –  Mike Moore Aug 4 '10 at 1:54
    
It's a reference counting thing, which is a whole action not needed when there is none. –  Wrikken Aug 4 '10 at 2:05

That's why we have the $_REQUEST superglobal.

protected function checkVar($varname, $checkIfNumber = false)
{
    if(!isset($_REQUEST[$varname])) {
        throw new Exception("variable [$varname] is not set in AController::checkVar().");
    } else if(empty($_REQUEST[$varname])) {
        throw new Exception("variable [$varname] is empty in AController::checkVar().");
    } else  if($checkIfNumber) {
        if(!ctype_digit($_REQUEST[$varname])) {
            throw new Exception("variable [$varname] is not a number in AController::checkVar().");
        }
    }   

    return $_REQUEST[$varname];
}

I know it's not strictly the same thing, but IMHO it's good enough.

share|improve this answer
    
I didn't know about $_REQUEST! So, if I understand correctly, as long as I check which request method has been used before calling your example, then this will work for GET, POST, and COOKIE?? –  Mike Moore Aug 4 '10 at 1:49
    
Thank-you for your excellent answer. I chose @Wrikken's answer since it was about the main point, which was using reference. –  Mike Moore Aug 4 '10 at 14:59
    
@lets No sweat :) –  NullUserException Aug 4 '10 at 17:13

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