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I am trying to read a simple text file into a String. Of course there is the usual way of getting the input stream and iterating with readLine() and reading contents into String.

Having done this hundreds of times in past, I just wondered how can I do this in minimum lines of code? Isn't there something in java like String fileContents = XXX.readFile(myFile/*File*/) .. rather anything that looks as simple as this?

I know there are libraries like Apache Commons IO which provide such simplifications or even I can write a simple Util class to do this. But all that I wonder is - this is a so frequent operation that everyone needs then why doesn't Java provide such simple function? Isn't there really a single method somewhere to read a file into string with some default or specified encoding?

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If you use java, this is not a problem question. You should make a Util method for this. –  Paarth Aug 4 '10 at 5:23
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@Paarth. that I already mentioned in my question. The question is why java does not provide a simple method as I mentioned. –  Gopi Aug 4 '10 at 5:28
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Negative voters please state the the reasons ... –  Gopi Sep 8 '10 at 12:01
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6 Answers

up vote 78 down vote accepted

Yes, you can do this in one line (though for robust IOException handling you wouldn't want to).

String content = new Scanner(new File("filename")).useDelimiter("\\Z").next();
System.out.println(content);

This uses a java.util.Scanner, telling it to delimit the input with \Z, which is the end of the string anchor. This ultimately makes the input have one actual token, which is the entire file, so it can be read with one call to next().

There is a constructor that takes a File and a String charSetName (among many other overloads). These two constructor may throw FileNotFoundException, but like all Scanner methods, no IOException can be thrown beyond these constructors.

You can query the Scanner itself through the ioException() method if an IOException occurred or not. You may also want to explicitly close() the Scanner after you read the content, so perhaps storing the Scanner reference in a local variable is best.

See also

Related questions


Third-party library options

For completeness, these are some really good options if you have these very reputable and highly useful third party libraries:

Guava

com.google.common.io.Files contains many useful methods. The pertinent ones here are:

Apache Commons/IO

org.apache.commons.io.IOUtils also offer similar functionality:

  • String toString(InputStream, String encoding)
    • Using the specified character encoding, gets the contents of an InputStream as a String
  • List readLines(InputStream, String encoding)
    • ... as a (raw) List of String, one entry per line

Related questions

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Alright! Though may not be robust as you mentioned, no doubt this does it in minimum lines of code ! –  Gopi Aug 5 '10 at 4:38
    
Please also see solution below for Java 7 mechanism that's essentially one line with the default API, as with many things Java has moved on slightly since this question. –  Jim Jun 13 '13 at 13:45
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From Java 7 (API Description) onwards you can do:

new String(Files.readAllBytes(Paths.get(filePath)));

Where filePath is a String representing the file you want to load.

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I believe this will only work if the file was in the platform's default char set. –  Paul Jun 24 '13 at 10:01
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@Paul that would be okay as a default I think. You can always specify a charset when constructing the new String –  Mike Braun Jun 30 '13 at 19:20
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You can use apache commons IO..

FileInputStream fisTargetFile = new FileInputStream(new File("test.txt"));

String targetFileStr = IOUtils.toString(fisTargetFile, "UTF-8");
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What is it with Java programmers and always trying to use third party libraries when Java has built in facilities that work just fine. –  Jacob Feb 15 at 0:57
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Don't write your own util class to do this - I would recommend using Guava, which is full of all kinds of goodness. In this case you'd want either the Files class (if you're really just reading a file) or CharStreams for more general purpose reading. It has methods to read the data into a list of strings (readLines) or totally (toString).

It has similar useful methods for binary data too. And then there's the rest of the library...

I agree it's annoying that there's nothing similar in the standard libraries. Heck, just being able to supply a CharSet to a FileReader would make life a little simpler...

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Sadly, no.

I agree that such frequent operation should have easier implementation than copying of input line by line in loop, but you'll have to either write helper method or use external library.

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Another alternative approach is:

http://stackoverflow.com/questions/326390/how-to-create-a-java-string-from-the-contents-of-a-file/326440#326440

Other option is to use utilities provided open source libraries http://commons.apache.org/io/api-1.4/index.html?org/apache/commons/io/IOUtils.html

Why java doesn't provide such a common util API ? a) to keep the APIs generic so that encoding, buffering etc is handled by the programmer. b) make programmers do some work and write/share opensource util libraries :D ;-)

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+1 for the first link. Some really good material there. –  polygenelubricants Aug 5 '10 at 7:24
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