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How can i achieve this?

public class GenericClass<T>
{
    public Type getMyType()
    {
        //How do I return the type of T?
    }
}

Everything I have tried so far always returns type Object rather than the specific type used.

Thanks a lot.

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13 Answers

As others mentioned, it's impossible only doable with reflection.

If you really need the type, this is the usual (type-safe) workaround pattern:

public class GenericClass<T> {

     private final Class<T> type;

     public GenericClass(Class<T> type) {
          this.type = type;
     }

     public Class<T> getMyType() {
         return this.type;
     }
}
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2  
I like this answer but it's a little cumbersome to instantiate: GenericClass<AnotherClass> g = new GenericClass<AnotherClass>(AnotherClass.class); –  Eliseo Ocampos Aug 16 '13 at 16:21
1  
@Eliseo, excessive verbosity, that's Java. It got slightly better with Java 7's diamond operator, though. –  Henning Aug 17 '13 at 17:20
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Generics are not reified at run-time. This means the information is not present at run-time.

Adding generics to Java while mantaining backward compatibility was a tour-de-force (you can see the seminal paper about it: Making the future safe for the past: adding genericity to the Java programming language).

There is a rich literature on the subject, and some people are dissatisfied with the current state, some says that actually it's a lure and there is no real need for it. You can read both links, I found them quite interesting.

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+1: Some very interesting links there that cover the background pretty well. –  Donal Fellows Aug 4 '10 at 8:54
24  
Of course we are dissatisfied, .NET has much better generic handling mechanism –  Pacerier Mar 6 '12 at 12:35
1  
@Pacerier: but reified generics alone would not bring Java to the level of .NET. Value types an specialized code for those is at least equally important for why .NET is better in the generics area. –  Joachim Sauer Jul 19 '12 at 14:34
    
@JoachimSauer, yes value types. I'd always wanted those in java. Btw what do you mean by specialized code? –  Pacerier Jul 19 '12 at 17:31
    
@Pacerier: well, in Java an array of non-primitives is always "one-reference-per-element" large. With specialized code for value types that could be "x-bytes-per-element" where x is the size of the value type. I.e. you could use real packed arrays as used in C/C++. –  Joachim Sauer Jul 19 '12 at 18:45
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I have seen something like this

private Class<T> persistentClass;

public Constructor() {
    this.persistentClass = (Class<T>) ((ParameterizedType) getClass()
                            .getGenericSuperclass()).getActualTypeArguments()[0];
 }

in the hibernate GenericDataAccessObjects Example

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24  
This technique works where the type parameter is defined on the immediate superclass, but it fails if the type parameter is defined elsewhere in the type hierarchy. For handling more complex cases something like TypeTools can be used. The docs include an example of a more sophisticated Generic DAO. –  Jonathan Aug 19 '11 at 4:34
    
worked for me, thanks –  Pilgrim Dec 6 '12 at 9:44
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Sure, you can.

Java does not use the information at compile time, for backwards compatibility reasons. But the information is actually present as metadata and can be accessed via reflection (but it is still not used for type-checking).

From the official API:

http://download.oracle.com/javase/6/docs/api/java/lang/reflect/ParameterizedType.html#getActualTypeArguments%28%29

However, for your scenario I would not use reflection. I'm personally more inclined to use that for framework code. In your case I would just add the type as a constructor param.

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1  
Ah, wow! That's very interresting. –  Henning Aug 4 '10 at 9:50
    
Seems related: artima.com/weblogs/viewpost.jsp?thread=208860 –  ewernli Aug 4 '10 at 10:13
5  
getActualTypeArguments only returns the type arguments for the immediate class. If you have a complex type hierarchy where T could be parameterized anywhere in the hierarchy, you'll need to do a bit of work to figure out what it is. This is more or less what TypeTools does. –  Jonathan Aug 19 '11 at 4:38
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Java generics are mostly compile time, this means that the type information is lost at runtime.

class GenericCls<T>
{
    T t;
}

will be compiled to something like

class GenericCls
{
   Object o;
}

To get the type information at runtime you have to add it as an argument of the ctor.

class GenericCls<T>
{
     private Class<T> type;
     public GenericCls(Class<T> cls)
     {
        type= cls;
     }
     Class<T> getType(){return type;}
}

Example:

GenericCls<?> instance = new GenericCls<String>(String.class);
assert instance.getType() == String.class;
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Technique described in this article by Ian Robertson works for me.

In short quick and dirty example:

 public abstract class AbstractDAO<T extends EntityInterface, U extends QueryCriteria, V>
 {
    /**
     * Method returns class implementing EntityInterface which was used in class
     * extending AbstractDAO
     *
     * @return Class<T extends EntityInterface>
     */
    public Class<T> returnedClass()
    {
        return (Class<T>) getTypeArguments(AbstractDAO.class, getClass()).get(0);
    }

    /**
     * Get the underlying class for a type, or null if the type is a variable
     * type.
     *
     * @param type the type
     * @return the underlying class
     */
    public static Class<?> getClass(Type type)
    {
        if (type instanceof Class) {
            return (Class) type;
        } else if (type instanceof ParameterizedType) {
            return getClass(((ParameterizedType) type).getRawType());
        } else if (type instanceof GenericArrayType) {
            Type componentType = ((GenericArrayType) type).getGenericComponentType();
            Class<?> componentClass = getClass(componentType);
            if (componentClass != null) {
                return Array.newInstance(componentClass, 0).getClass();
            } else {
                return null;
            }
        } else {
            return null;
        }
    }

    /**
     * Get the actual type arguments a child class has used to extend a generic
     * base class.
     *
     * @param baseClass the base class
     * @param childClass the child class
     * @return a list of the raw classes for the actual type arguments.
     */
    public static <T> List<Class<?>> getTypeArguments(
            Class<T> baseClass, Class<? extends T> childClass)
    {
        Map<Type, Type> resolvedTypes = new HashMap<Type, Type>();
        Type type = childClass;
        // start walking up the inheritance hierarchy until we hit baseClass
        while (!getClass(type).equals(baseClass)) {
            if (type instanceof Class) {
                // there is no useful information for us in raw types, so just keep going.
                type = ((Class) type).getGenericSuperclass();
            } else {
                ParameterizedType parameterizedType = (ParameterizedType) type;
                Class<?> rawType = (Class) parameterizedType.getRawType();

                Type[] actualTypeArguments = parameterizedType.getActualTypeArguments();
                TypeVariable<?>[] typeParameters = rawType.getTypeParameters();
                for (int i = 0; i < actualTypeArguments.length; i++) {
                    resolvedTypes.put(typeParameters[i], actualTypeArguments[i]);
                }

                if (!rawType.equals(baseClass)) {
                    type = rawType.getGenericSuperclass();
                }
            }
        }

        // finally, for each actual type argument provided to baseClass, determine (if possible)
        // the raw class for that type argument.
        Type[] actualTypeArguments;
        if (type instanceof Class) {
            actualTypeArguments = ((Class) type).getTypeParameters();
        } else {
            actualTypeArguments = ((ParameterizedType) type).getActualTypeArguments();
        }
        List<Class<?>> typeArgumentsAsClasses = new ArrayList<Class<?>>();
        // resolve types by chasing down type variables.
        for (Type baseType : actualTypeArguments) {
            while (resolvedTypes.containsKey(baseType)) {
                baseType = resolvedTypes.get(baseType);
            }
            typeArgumentsAsClasses.add(getClass(baseType));
        }
        return typeArgumentsAsClasses;
    }
  }
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I dont think you can, Java uses type erasure when compiling so your code is compatible with applications and libraries that were created pre-generics.

http://docs.oracle.com/javase/tutorial/java/generics/erasure.html

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Jup, it's impossible. Java would need reified generics for that to work. –  Henning Aug 4 '10 at 8:51
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This is my solution:

import java.lang.reflect.Type;
import java.lang.reflect.TypeVariable;

public class GenericClass<T extends String> {

  public static void main(String[] args) {
     for (TypeVariable typeParam : GenericClass.class.getTypeParameters()) {
      System.out.println(typeParam.getName());
      for (Type bound : typeParam.getBounds()) {
         System.out.println(bound);
      }
    }
  }
}
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1  
This is not an answer for this question. –  Adam Arold Sep 4 '13 at 14:04
    
This one worked like beauty –  Vishnudev K Jan 21 at 12:08
1  
My code is not the exact solution for the question. It returns the generic type parameters of the class, but not the actual type of T. But it may be helpful for others who stumple upon the question and are looking for my solution. –  Matthias Jan 24 at 8:30
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Use Guava.

public abstract class GenericClass<T> {
  private final TypeToken typeToken = new TypeToken(getClass()) { };
  private final Type type = typeToken.getType(); // or getRawType() to return Class<? super T>

  public Type getType() {
    return type;
  }
}

GenericClass<String> example = new Generic Class<String>();
example.getType() # => String

A while back, I posted some full-fledge examples including abstract classes and subclasses here.

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The constructor TypeToken(Type) is not visible –  Zefnus Feb 3 at 8:27
    
Notice that I create an empty anonymous subclass (see the two curly braces at the end). This uses reflection to battle Java's runtime type erasure. You can learn more here: code.google.com/p/guava-libraries/wiki/ReflectionExplained –  Cody A. Ray Feb 4 at 0:15
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You can't. If you add a member variable of type T to the class (you don't even have to initialise it), you could use that to recover the type.

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Oops, ok. You do have to initialise it from a constructor. –  andrewmu Aug 4 '10 at 13:53
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Here is my trick:

public class Main {

    public static void main(String[] args) throws Exception {

        System.out.println(Main.<String> getClazz());

    }

    static <T> Class getClazz(T... param) {

        return param.getClass().getComponentType();
    }

}
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If it is your case this answer I posted could be useful for you.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/22675121/1560067

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Here's one way, which I've had to use once or twice:

public abstract class GenericClass<T>{
    public abstract Class<T> getMyType();
}

Along with

public class SpecificClass extends GenericClass<String>{

    @Override
    public Class<String> getMyType(){
        return String.class;
    }
}
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This technically works, however it doesn't solve the general case, and I think that is what the original poster is after. –  GGB667 Nov 5 '13 at 15:02
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