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I have a very large numpy array (containing up to a million elements) like the one below:

[ 0  1  6  5  1  2  7  6  2  3  8  7  3  4  9  8  5  6 11 10  6  7 12 11  7
  8 13 12  8  9 14 13 10 11 16 15 11 12 17 16 12 13 18 17 13 14 19 18 15 16
 21 20 16 17 22 21 17 18 23 22 18 19 24 23]

and a small dictionary map for replacing some of the elements in the above array

{4: 0, 9: 5, 14: 10, 19: 15, 20: 0, 21: 1, 22: 2, 23: 3, 24: 0}

I would like to replace some of the elements according to the map above. The numpy array is really large, and only a small subset of the elements (occurring as keys in the dictionary) will be replaced with the corresponding values. What is the fastest way to do this?

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up vote 19 down vote accepted

I believe there's even more efficient method, but for now, try

from numpy import copy

newArray = copy(theArray)
for k, v in d.iteritems(): newArray[theArray==k] = v

Microbenchmark and test for correctness:

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7

from numpy import copy, random, arange

random.seed(0)
data = random.randint(30, size=10**5)

d = {4: 0, 9: 5, 14: 10, 19: 15, 20: 0, 21: 1, 22: 2, 23: 3, 24: 0}
dk = d.keys()
dv = d.values()

def f1(a, d):
    b = copy(a)
    for k, v in d.iteritems():
        b[a==k] = v
    return b

def f2(a, d):
    for i in xrange(len(a)):
        a[i] = d.get(a[i], a[i])
    return a

def f3(a, dk, dv):
    mp = arange(0, max(a)+1)
    mp[dk] = dv
    return mp[a]


a = copy(data)
res = f2(a, d)

assert (f1(data, d) == res).all()
assert (f3(data, dk, dv) == res).all()

Result:

$ python2.7 -m timeit -s 'from w import f1,f3,data,d,dk,dv' 'f1(data,d)'
100 loops, best of 3: 6.15 msec per loop

$ python2.7 -m timeit -s 'from w import f1,f3,data,d,dk,dv' 'f3(data,dk,dv)'
100 loops, best of 3: 19.6 msec per loop
share|improve this answer
3  
numpy.place I think... – katrielalex Aug 4 '10 at 9:30
    
Iterating like for k in d would make this as fast as possible` – jamylak Jun 7 '13 at 21:17

Assuming the values are between 0 and some maximum integer, one could implement a fast replace by using the numpy-array as int->int dict, like below

mp = numpy.arange(0,max(data)+1)
mp[replace.keys()] = replace.values()
data = mp[data]

where first

data = [ 0  1  6  5  1  2  7  6  2  3  8  7  3  4  9  8  5  6 11 10  6  7 12 11  7
  8 13 12  8  9 14 13 10 11 16 15 11 12 17 16 12 13 18 17 13 14 19 18 15 16
 21 20 16 17 22 21 17 18 23 22 18 19 24 23]

and replacing with

replace = {4: 0, 9: 5, 14: 10, 19: 15, 20: 0, 21: 1, 22: 2, 23: 3, 24: 0}

we obtain

data = [ 0  1  6  5  1  2  7  6  2  3  8  7  3  0  5  8  5  6 11 10  6  7 12 11  7
  8 13 12  8  5 10 13 10 11 16 15 11 12 17 16 12 13 18 17 13 10 15 18 15 16
  1  0 16 17  2  1 17 18  3  2 18 15  0  3]
share|improve this answer
    
Also note the digitize function, shown in the accepted answer to this question: stackoverflow.com/questions/13572448/… – Stefan van der Walt Jan 16 '15 at 17:20

Another more general way to achieve this is function vectorization:

import numpy as np

data = np.array([0, 1, 6, 5, 1, 2, 7, 6, 2, 3, 8, 7, 3, 4, 9, 8, 5, 6, 11, 10, 6, 7, 12, 11, 7, 8, 13, 12, 8, 9, 14, 13, 10, 11, 16, 15, 11, 12, 17, 16, 12, 13, 18, 17, 13, 14, 19, 18, 15, 16, 21, 20, 16, 17, 22, 21, 17, 18, 23, 22, 18, 19, 24, 23])
mapper_dict = {4: 0, 9: 5, 14: 10, 19: 15, 20: 0, 21: 1, 22: 2, 23: 3, 24: 0}

def mp(entry):
    return mapper_dict[entry] if entry in mapper_dict else entry
mp = np.vectorize(mp)

print mp(data)
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No solution was posted still without a python loop on the array (except Celil's one, which however assume numbers are "small"), so here is an alternative:

def replace(arr, rep_dict):
    """Assumes all elements of "arr" are keys of rep_dict"""

    # Removing the explicit "list" breaks python3
    rep_keys, rep_vals = array(list(zip(*sorted(rep_dict.items()))))

    idces = digitize(arr, rep_keys, right=True)
    # Notice rep_keys[digitize(arr, rep_keys, right=True)] == arr

    return rep_vals[idces]

the way "idces" is created comes from here.

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for i in xrange(len(the_array)):
    the_array[i] = the_dict.get(the_array[i], the_array[i])
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Well, you need to make one pass through theArray, and for each element replace it if it is in the dictionary.

for i in xrange( len( theArray ) ):
    if foo[ i ] in dict:
        foo[ i ] = dict[ foo[ i ] ]
share|improve this answer
    
It would be better to put len(theArray) into variable, and use xrange. – fuwaneko Aug 4 '10 at 9:12
    
@fuw: Yes xrange, but putting len(theArray) into a variable won't help because the iterator is evaluated once only. – kennytm Aug 4 '10 at 9:13
    
Py3k's range is a generator. – katrielalex Aug 4 '10 at 9:24
2  
There's no NumPy for Python 3.x yet. – kennytm Aug 4 '10 at 9:32
    
Oopsie. Thanks. – katrielalex Aug 4 '10 at 10:18

I benchmarked some solutions, and the result is without appeal :

import timeit
import numpy as np

array = 2 * np.round(np.random.uniform(0,10000,300000)).astype(int)
from_values = np.unique(array) # pair values from 0 to 2000
to_values = np.arange(from_values.size) # all values from 0 to 1000
d = dict(zip(from_values, to_values))

def method_for_loop():
    out = array.copy()
    for from_value, to_value in zip(from_values, to_values) :
        out[out == from_value] = to_value
    print('Check method_for_loop :', np.all(out == array/2)) # Just checking
print('Time method_for_loop :', timeit.timeit(method_for_loop, number = 1))

def method_list_comprehension():
    out = [d[i] for i in array]
    print('Check method_list_comprehension :', np.all(out == array/2)) # Just checking
print('Time method_list_comprehension :', timeit.timeit(method_list_comprehension, number = 1))

def method_bruteforce():
    idx = np.nonzero(from_values == array[:,None])[1]
    out = to_values[idx]
    print('Check method_bruteforce :', np.all(out == array/2)) # Just checking
print('Time method_bruteforce :', timeit.timeit(method_bruteforce, number = 1))

def method_searchsort():
    sort_idx = np.argsort(from_values)
    idx = np.searchsorted(from_values,array,sorter = sort_idx)
    out = to_values[sort_idx][idx]
    print('Check method_searchsort :', np.all(out == array/2)) # Just checking
print('Time method_searchsort :', timeit.timeit(method_searchsort, number = 1))

And I got the following results :

Check method_for_loop : True
Time method_for_loop : 2.6411612760275602

Check method_list_comprehension : True
Time method_list_comprehension : 0.07994363596662879

Check method_bruteforce : True
Time method_bruteforce : 11.960559037979692

Check method_searchsort : True
Time method_searchsort : 0.03770717792212963

The "searchsort" method is almost a thousand time faster than the "for" loop, and about 3600 times faster than the numpy bruteforce method. The list comprehension method is also a very good trade-off between code simplicity and speed.

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