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I tried the following code...

string pass = "";
Console.Write("Enter your password: ");
ConsoleKeyInfo key;

do
{
    key = Console.ReadKey(true);

    // Backspace Should Not Work
    if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace)
    {
        pass += key.KeyChar;
        Console.Write("*");
    }
    else
    {
        Console.Write("\b");
    }
}
// Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);

Console.WriteLine();
Console.WriteLine("The Password You entered is : " + pass);

But this way the backspace functionality doesn't work while typing the password. Any suggestion?

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3  
I suggest you do not echo anything back to the console because that'll expose the length of the password. –  Ray Cheng Aug 15 '12 at 20:41
    
@RayCheng - fair enough, but very few user interfaces (other than on some Unix systems) echo nothing at all. For consistent user experience with other apps and websites, showing the * characters is probably best. –  Stephen Holt Feb 19 at 14:02
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9 Answers

up vote 56 down vote accepted

Console.Write("\b \b"); will delete the asterisk character from the screen, but you do not have any code within your else block that removes the previously entered character from your pass string variable.

Here's the relevant code portion (the if..else section) that should do what you require:

// Backspace Should Not Work
if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace && key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter)
{
   pass += key.KeyChar;
   Console.Write("*");
}
else
{
   if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && pass.Length > 0)
   {
      pass = pass.Substring(0, (pass.Length - 1));
      Console.Write("\b \b");
   }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Oh I thought \b \b will take me two places back. Nevertheless this seems to be working prfecttly. –  Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:16
2  
@Nadeem: Note the space character (' ') between the backspace characters ('\b'). "\b \b" takes you one place back, then prints a space (which takes you one place forward) and then takes you back again, so you end up where the deleted '*' character was. –  dtb Aug 4 '10 at 10:23
2  
@Nadeem - The first \b moves the cursor back one position (now underneath the last * char. The [space] character "prints over" the asterisk, but also moves the cursor one character forward again, so the last \b moves the cursor back to where the last * used to be! (Phew - Hope that makes sense!) –  CraigTP Aug 4 '10 at 10:27
1  
if (pass.Length > 0) should be if (key.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && pass.Length > 0) otherwise you will not get the last character of the password.. –  MemphiZ Sep 13 '12 at 19:15
    
@MemphiZ - Good catch! Edited to reflect the fix. –  CraigTP Sep 14 '12 at 7:33
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For this you should use the SecureString

  public SecureString getPassword()
        {
            SecureString pwd = new SecureString();
            while (true)
            {
                ConsoleKeyInfo i = Console.ReadKey(true);
                if (i.Key == ConsoleKey.Enter)
                {
                    break;
                }
                else if (i.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace)
                {
                    if (pwd.Length > 0)
                    {
                        pwd.RemoveAt(pwd.Length - 1);
                        Console.Write("\b \b");
                    }
                }
                else
                {
                    pwd.AppendChar(i.KeyChar);
                    Console.Write("*");
                }
            }
            return pwd;
        }
share|improve this answer
    
This will only take me two places back. But what I need is that when I press Backspace the last character should be deleted. Just like the original functinality of backspace. –  Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:08
    
I needed to nest if( pwd.Length > 0) into the first else statement to stop people deleting the question :) –  Dead.Rabit Jun 25 '12 at 10:18
    
Perfect for use with System.Net.NetworkCredential(). –  mbrownnyc Nov 7 '13 at 18:20
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Complete solution, vanilla C# .net 3.5+

Cut & Paste :)

    using System;
    using System.Collections.Generic;
    using System.Linq;
    using System.Text;

    namespace ConsoleReadPasswords
    {
        class Program
        {
            static void Main(string[] args)
            {
                Console.Write("Password:");

                string password = Orb.App.Console.ReadPassword();

                Console.WriteLine("Sorry - I just can't keep a secret!");
                Console.WriteLine("Your password was:\n<Password>{0}</Password>", password);

                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }
    }

    namespace Orb.App
    {
        /// <summary>
        /// Adds some nice help to the console. Static extension methods don't exist (probably for a good reason) so the next best thing is congruent naming.
        /// </summary>
        static public class Console
        {
            /// <summary>
            /// Like System.Console.ReadLine(), only with a mask.
            /// </summary>
            /// <param name="mask">a <c>char</c> representing your choice of console mask</param>
            /// <returns>the string the user typed in </returns>
            public static string ReadPassword(char mask)
            {
                const int ENTER = 13, BACKSP = 8, CTRLBACKSP = 127;
                int[] FILTERED = { 0, 27, 9, 10 /*, 32 space, if you care */ }; // const

                var pass = new Stack<char>();
                char chr = (char)0;

                while ((chr = System.Console.ReadKey(true).KeyChar) != ENTER)
                {
                    if (chr == BACKSP)
                    {
                        if (pass.Count > 0)
                        {
                            System.Console.Write("\b \b");
                            pass.Pop();
                        }
                    }
                    else if (chr == CTRLBACKSP)
                    {
                        while (pass.Count > 0)
                        {
                            System.Console.Write("\b \b");
                            pass.Pop();
                        }
                    }
                    else if (FILTERED.Count(x => chr == x) > 0) { }
                    else
                    {
                        pass.Push((char)chr);
                        System.Console.Write(mask);
                    }
                }

                System.Console.WriteLine();

                return new string(pass.Reverse().ToArray());
            }

            /// <summary>
            /// Like System.Console.ReadLine(), only with a mask.
            /// </summary>
            /// <returns>the string the user typed in </returns>
            public static string ReadPassword()
            {
                return Orb.App.Console.ReadPassword('*');
            }
        }
    }
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You could append your keys to an accumulating linked list.

When a backspace key is received, remove the last key from the list.

When you receive the enter key, collapse your list into a string and do the rest of your work.

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Sounds achievable but how will I remove the last character from the display. –  Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:09
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I made some changes for backspace

        string pass = "";
        Console.Write("Enter your password: ");
        ConsoleKeyInfo key;

        do
        {
            key = Console.ReadKey(true);

            // Backspace Should Not Work
            if (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Backspace)
            {
                pass += key.KeyChar;
                Console.Write("*");
            }
            else
            {
                pass = pass.Remove(pass.Length - 1);
                Console.Write("\b \b");
            }
        }
        // Stops Receving Keys Once Enter is Pressed
        while (key.Key != ConsoleKey.Enter);

        Console.WriteLine();
        Console.WriteLine("The Password You entered is : " + pass);
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Mine ignores control characters and handles line wrapping:

public static string ReadLineMasked(char mask = '*')
{
    var sb = new StringBuilder();
    ConsoleKeyInfo keyInfo;
    while ((keyInfo = Console.ReadKey(true)).Key != ConsoleKey.Enter)
    {
        if (!char.IsControl(keyInfo.KeyChar))
        {
            sb.Append(keyInfo.KeyChar);
            Console.Write(mask);
        }
        else if (keyInfo.Key == ConsoleKey.Backspace && sb.Length > 0)
        {
            sb.Remove(sb.Length - 1, 1);

            if (Console.CursorLeft == 0)
            {
                Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
                Console.Write(' ');
                Console.SetCursorPosition(Console.BufferWidth - 1, Console.CursorTop - 1);
            }
            else Console.Write("\b \b");
        }
    }
    Console.WriteLine();
    return sb.ToString();
}
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If I understand this correctly, you're trying to make backspace delete both the visible * character on screen and the cached character in your pass variable?

If so, then just change your else block to this:

            else
            {
                Console.Write("\b");
                pass = pass.Remove(pass.Length -1);
            }
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This will work fine except that the deletion of the character by backspace will not be displayed. –  Nadeem Aug 4 '10 at 10:11
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you have to pay attention to handle left arrow key press followed by delete or backspace or even insertion. There are also other possibilities of using right arrow key after left arrow key etc..

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It may be too late for the original poster of this article, but it may be interesting for others with the same problem.

I have an article on how to require passwords from a console application the secure way. Also how to transform the securestring to a salted hash.

http://pingtheinternet.com/?p=46

Basically you read chars until an enter is encountered. You append the chars to a SecureString. Later your can use the SecureString to create a password hash or pass it to other classes that require it.

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@Vash posted that two years before you. And the link brings to a page which asks for authentication. I don't have time and patience to crack it though, looks like some lame BASIC authentication. –  Csaba Toth Sep 18 '13 at 18:45
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