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text-overflow

I've tried some jquery plugins out here and there, but cannot find the one i'm looking for. Any recommendation? ideas?

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and stackoverflow.com/questions/3922739/… for css-only solution –  Eugene Xa Mar 22 '13 at 0:36
    
related article css-tricks.com/line-clampin –  Adrien Be Aug 11 at 8:27

12 Answers 12

Just a quick basic idea.

I was testing with the following markup:

<div id="fos">
<p>Lorem ipsum dolor sit amet, consectetur adipiscing elit. Proin nisi ligula, dapibus a volutpat sit amet, mattis et dui. Nunc porttitor accumsan orci id luctus. Phasellus ipsum metus, tincidunt non rhoncus id, dictum a lectus. Nam sed ipsum a lacus sodales eleifend. Vestibulum lorem felis, rhoncus elementum vestibulum eget, dictum ut velit. Nullam venenatis, elit in suscipit imperdiet, orci purus posuere mauris, quis adipiscing ipsum urna ac quam.</p>  
</div>

And CSS:

#fos { width: 300px; height: 190px; overflow: hidden; }
#fos p { padding: 10px; margin: 0; }

Applying this jQuery will accomplish the desired result:

var $p = $('#fos p');
var divh = $('#fos').height();
while ($p.outerHeight() > divh) {
    $p.text(function (index, text) {
        return text.replace(/\W*\s(\S)*$/, '...');
    });
}

It repeatedly tries to remove the last word of the text until it reaches the desired size. Because of the overflow: hidden; the process remains invisible and even with JS turned off the result remains 'visually correct' (without the "..." of course).

If you combine this with a sensible truncation on the server-side (that leaves only a small overhead) then it will run quicker :).

Again, this is not a complete solution, just an idea.

UPDATE: Added a jsFiddle Demo.

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1  
great solution @bazmegakapa... but I have some issues trying to adapt it to my case. I have various li and inside on of each one there is a .block and a .block h2 and I need to apply this to the h2 inside .block but I couldn't get it to work. Is it any diferent if there are more than one .block h2? –  w0rldart Jan 31 '12 at 22:42
    
@w0rldart Could you create a jsFiddle showing the way you are trying to do it? –  kapa Jan 31 '12 at 23:17
    
    
Doesn't work in WebKit when we tested, but dotdotdot (see Matt's answer) seems to work fine. –  Benjamin Oakes Mar 5 '12 at 14:57
    
@BenjaminOakes Never said it is a ready to use solution. It works fine in the jsFiddle Demo. I never went any further with it, it was just an idea. –  kapa Mar 5 '12 at 15:49

Try the jQuery.dotdotdot plugin.

$(".ellipsis").dotdotdot();
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8  
Should be the accepted answer. Thanks! –  Arnaud Feb 3 '12 at 17:54
7  
How would you pronounce that? dot-dot-dot-dot? –  JackAce Nov 15 '12 at 23:20
14  
Really sucks to use > 600 lines of js to solve a problem that should be solved by css –  Jethro Larson Jun 14 '13 at 23:54
    
I have tried it, and it is working fine. Should be the accepted answer –  AbdelHady Oct 3 '13 at 11:05
    
@JethroLarson I agree (CSS should provide this feature). This js library is only 2.5Kb once minified & Gzipped though. So this looks fine to me as a work around for now. –  Adrien Be Aug 11 at 8:18

There is no such feature in HTML, and this is very frustrating.

I have developed a library to deal with this.

  • Multiline text-overflow: ellipsis
  • Multiline text with technologies that does not support it: SVG, Canvas for example
  • Have exactly the same line breaks in your SVG text, in your HTML rendering, and in your PDF export for example

Check out my site for screenshot, tutorial, and dowload link.

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Updated link: samuelrossille.com/home/jstext.html –  Michael Maddox Dec 11 '13 at 19:39
    
"error establishing db connection"... you may want to do like everybody else & host your project on Github, it'd probably be nicer for you & for the community :) –  Adrien Be Aug 11 at 8:20
    
@AdrienBe it's on Github: github.com/rossille/jstext, and you're right, github being more stable than my website, I set the github page as the main link –  Samuel Rossille Aug 11 at 13:38
    
@SamuelRossille great news, thanks for the quick update! –  Adrien Be Aug 11 at 14:23

I have a solution which works well but instead an ellipsis it uses a gradient. The advantages are that you don't have to do any JavaScript calculations and it works for variable width containers including table cells. It uses a couple of extra divs, but it's very easy to implement.

http://salzerdesign.com/blog/?p=453

Edit: Sorry, I did't know that the link wasn't enough. The solution is to put a div around the text, and style the div to control the overflow. Inside the div put another div with a "fade" gradient which can be made by using CSS or an image (for old IE). The gradient goes from transparent to the background color of the table cell and is a bit wider than an ellipsis. If the text is long and overflows, it goes under the "fade" div and looks "faded out". If the text is short, the fade is invisible so there is no problem. The two containers can be adjusted to let one or multiple lines show by setting the height of the container as a multiple of the text line height. The "fade" div can be positioned to only cover the last line.

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Please share the important parts of your solution, on SO link-only answers are not allowed. –  kapa May 26 '13 at 15:44
    
the brilliant aspect of this is the text itself is not truncated, so if the user copy-pastes the table the entire content appears. –  user645715 Jan 29 at 17:37
    
A very nice concept. It is also mentioned in this article ("fade out" way) I believe css-tricks.com/line-clampin –  Adrien Be Aug 11 at 8:22

Pure JS solution based on bažmegakapa's solution, and some cleanup to account for people who try to give a height/max-height that is less than the element's lineHeight:

  var truncationEl = document.getElementById('truncation-test');
  function calculateTruncation(el) {
    var text;
    while(el.clientHeight < el.scrollHeight) {
      text = el.innerHTML.trim();
      if(text.split(' ').length <= 1) {
        break;
      }
      el.innerHTML = text.replace(/\W*\s(\S)*$/, '...');
    }
  }

  calculateTruncation(truncationEl);
share|improve this answer

Here is a pure CSS way to accomplish this: http://www.mobify.com/blog/multiline-ellipsis-in-pure-css/

Here is a summary:

enter image description here

<html>
<head>
<style>
    html, body, p { margin: 0; padding: 0; font-family: sans-serif;}

    .ellipsis {
        overflow: hidden;
        height: 200px;
        line-height: 25px;
        margin: 20px;
        border: 5px solid #AAA; }

    .ellipsis:before {
        content:"";
        float: left;
        width: 5px; height: 200px; }

    .ellipsis > *:first-child {
        float: right;
        width: 100%;
        margin-left: -5px; }        

    .ellipsis:after {
        content: "\02026";  

        box-sizing: content-box;
        -webkit-box-sizing: content-box;
        -moz-box-sizing: content-box;

        float: right; position: relative;
        top: -25px; left: 100%; 
        width: 3em; margin-left: -3em;
        padding-right: 5px;

        text-align: right;

        background: -webkit-gradient(linear, left top, right top,
            from(rgba(255, 255, 255, 0)), to(white), color-stop(50%, white));
        background: -moz-linear-gradient(to right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 50%, white);           
        background: -o-linear-gradient(to right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 50%, white);
        background: -ms-linear-gradient(to right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 50%, white);
        background: linear-gradient(to right, rgba(255, 255, 255, 0), white 50%, white); }
</style>
</head>
<body>
    <div class="ellipsis">
        <div>
            <p>Call me Ishmael.....</p> 
        </div>
    </div>
</body>
</html>
share|improve this answer

You probably can't do it (currently?) without a fixed-width font like Courier. With a fixed-width font every letter occupies the same horizontal space, so you could probably count the letters and multiply the result with the current font size in ems or exs. Then you would just have to test how many letters fit on one line, and then break it up.

Alternatively, for non-fixed-with fonts you might be able to create a mapping for all possible characters (like i = 2px, m = 5px) and then do the math. A lot of ugly work though.

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To expand on @DanMan's solution: in the case where variable-width fonts are used, you could use an average font width. This has two problems: 1) a text with too many W's would overflow and 2) a text with too many I's would be truncated earlier.

Or you could take a worst-case approach and use the width of the letter "W" (which I believe is the widest). This removes problem 1 above but intensifies problem 2.

A different approach could be: leave overflow: clip in the div and add an ellipsis section (maybe another div or image) with float: right; position: relative; bottom: 0px; (untested). The trick is to make the image appear above the end of text.

You could also only display the image when you know it's going to overflow (say, after about 100 characters)

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What is overflow: clip? And what would you expect that CSS with float to do? –  kapa Jun 13 '12 at 6:18

With this code there is no need for an extra wrapper div if the element has it's height limited by a max-height style.

// Shorten texts in overflowed paragraphs to emulate Operas text-overflow: -o-ellipsis-lastline
$('.ellipsis-lastline').each(function(i, e) {
    var $e = $(e), original_content = $e.text();
    while (e.scrollHeight > e.clientHeight)
        $e.text($e.text().replace(/\W*\w+\W*$/, '…'));
    $e.attr('data-original-content', original_content);
});

Also it saves the original text in a data attribute that can be displayed using only styles, eg. on mouse over:

.ellipsis-lastline {
    max-height: 5em;
}
.ellipsis-lastline:before {
    content: attr(data-original-content);
    position: absolute;
    display: none;
}
.ellipsis-lastline:hover:before {
    display: block;
}
share|improve this answer
1  
That's often infinite loop. –  Atadj Jan 3 '13 at 18:34

not sure if this is what you're looking for, it uses min-height instead of height.

    <div id="content" style="min-height:10px;width:190px;background:lightblue;">
    <?php 
        function truncate($text,$numb) {
            // source: www.kigoobe.com, please keep this if you are using the function
            $text = html_entity_decode($text, ENT_QUOTES);
            if (strlen($text) > $numb) {
                $text = substr($text, 0, $numb);
                $etc = "..."; 
                $text = $text.$etc;
            } 
            $text = htmlentities($text, ENT_QUOTES);
            return $text;
        }
        echo truncate("this is a multi-lines text block, some lines inside the div, while some outside", 63);
    ?>
    </div>
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4  
The problem is the number 63 in your codes, if the number is known then everything become easy, just a truncate function does this job, as your codes. However, how to know the number? In other words, how to know where the text will be line-breaked? If this question can be answered, then the problem can be simply resolved in logic of "1, calculate the number; 2, truncate" –  Edward Aug 22 '10 at 7:27

Not an exact answer to the question, but I came across this page when trying to do very similar, but wanting to add a link to "view more" rather than just a straightforward ellipsis. This is a jQuery function that will add a "more" link to text that is overflowing a container. Personally I'm using this with Bootstrap, but of course it will work without.

Example more screenshot

To use, put your text in a container as follows:

<div class="more-less">
    <div class="more-block">
        <p>The long text goes in here</p>
    </div>
</div>

When the following jQuery function is added, any of the divs that are larger than the adjustheight value will be truncated and have a "More" link added.

$(function(){
    var adjustheight = 60;
    var moreText = '+ More';
    var lessText = '- Less';
    $(".more-less .more-block").each(function(){
        if ($(this).height() > adjustheight){
            $(this).css('height', adjustheight).css('overflow', 'hidden');
            $(this).parent(".more-less").append
                ('<a style="cursor:pointer" class="adjust">' + moreText + '</a>');
        }
    });
    $(".adjust").click(function() {
        if ($(this).prev().css('overflow') == 'hidden')
        {
            $(this).prev().css('height', 'auto').css('overflow', 'visible');
            $(this).text(lessText);
        }
        else {
            $(this).prev().css('height', adjustheight).css('overflow', 'hidden');
            $(this).text(moreText);
        }
    });
});

Based on this, but updated: http://shakenandstirredweb.com/240/jquery-moreless-text

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<sigh> I thought someone might downvote this, presumably because it's not an exact answer to the question. Nonetheless, I hope someone will find it useful, as I couldn't this information anywhere else and this is where I ended after a search. –  Andy Beverley Sep 7 at 23:41

Very simple func will do.

Directive:

  $scope.truncateAlbumName = function (name) {
    if (name.length > 36) {
      return name.slice(0, 34) + "..";
    } else {
      return name;
    }
  };

View:

<#p>{{truncateAlbumName(album.name)}}<#/p>

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2  
As we already discussed under other answers, the problem in your code is the number 36. Other than making your code specific to a certain container width, it is also not accurate: with not fixed-width fonts, there can be big differences between letters. See iiiiiiiiii vs MMMMMMMMMM (with the current font not that visible though :D). –  kapa Mar 25 '13 at 9:33

protected by kapa Mar 25 '13 at 9:35

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