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i want to loop over a period of time in tsql, and print the utc datetimes and our local variant. We live in UTC +1, so i could easily add 1 hour, but in the summertime we live in UTC +2.

In C# i can create a datetime and use a method to ask for the UTC variant and vice versa.

Till now i have this:

declare @counter int
declare @localdate datetime
declare @utcdate datetime
 set @counter = 0
 while @counter < 100
 begin
   set @counter = @counter + 1
   print 'The counter is ' + cast(@counter as char)
  set @utcdate  = DATEADD(day,@counter,GETUTCDATE())
  --set @localdate = ????

  print  @localdate  
  print @utcdate
 end
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5 Answers 5

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Assuming you are using SQL 2005 upwards, you can develop a SQL CLR function to take a UTC date and convert to the local date.

This link is an MSDN How-To explaining how you can create a scalar UDF in C#.

Create a SQL function along the lines of

[SqlFunction()]
public static SqlDateTime ConvertUtcToLocal(SqlDateTime utcDate) 
{
    // over to you to convert SqlDateTime to DateTime, specify Kind
    // as UTC, convert to local time, and convert back to SqlDateTime
}

Your sample above would then become

set @localdate = dbo.ConvertUtcToLocal(@utcdate)

SQL CLR has its overheads in terms of deployment, but I feel cases like this are where it fits in best.

share|improve this answer
    
thanks, gonna try that, i'll let you know –  Michel Aug 4 '10 at 19:49
    
figured out how to convert utc to other timezones, AND tried to implement a SqlCLR function. Combining them however did not work, because i'm using the TimeZoneInfo object to calculate the difference datetimes, and i can't reference the assembly that class is in from my SqlProject (as it seems you can only reference a subset of the .net framework) –  Michel Aug 6 '10 at 11:46
    
OK - curious as to why you need the TimeZoneInfo class given your requirement of converting UTC to Local. If your SQL server is configured as being in your local time zone (agreed - this is a constraint), then your c# function becomes something like 'return new SqlDateTime(utcDate.Value.toLocalTime());' . You don't need to specify a time zone. Have I mis-understood? –  Neil Moss Aug 6 '10 at 12:25
    
you're right, but it has to work for different users at different timezones –  Michel Aug 12 '10 at 9:27
    
At the end: didn't find a way to do it without hardcoding. Marked as answer for the effort Neil has done. –  Michel Aug 31 '10 at 9:34

I've been waiting for 5 years for a more elegant solution but since one has not emerged, I'll post what I've been using thus far...

CREATE FUNCTION [dbo].[UDTToLocalTime](@UDT AS DATETIME)  
RETURNS DATETIME
AS
BEGIN 
--====================================================
--Set the Timezone Offset (NOT During DST [Daylight Saving Time])
--====================================================
DECLARE @Offset AS SMALLINT
SET @Offset = -5

--====================================================
--Figure out the Offset Datetime
--====================================================
DECLARE @LocalDate AS DATETIME
SET @LocalDate = DATEADD(hh, @Offset, @UDT)

--====================================================
--Figure out the DST Offset for the UDT Datetime
--====================================================
DECLARE @DaylightSavingOffset AS SMALLINT
DECLARE @Year as SMALLINT
DECLARE @DSTStartDate AS DATETIME
DECLARE @DSTEndDate AS DATETIME
--Get Year
SET @Year = YEAR(@LocalDate)

--Get First Possible DST StartDay
IF (@Year > 2006) SET @DSTStartDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-03-08 02:00:00'
ELSE              SET @DSTStartDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-04-01 02:00:00'
--Get DST StartDate 
WHILE (DATENAME(dw, @DSTStartDate) <> 'sunday') SET @DSTStartDate = DATEADD(day, 1,@DSTStartDate)


--Get First Possible DST EndDate
IF (@Year > 2006) SET @DSTEndDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-11-01 02:00:00'
ELSE              SET @DSTEndDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-10-25 02:00:00'
--Get DST EndDate 
WHILE (DATENAME(dw, @DSTEndDate) <> 'sunday') SET @DSTEndDate = DATEADD(day,1,@DSTEndDate)

--Get DaylightSavingOffset
SET @DaylightSavingOffset = CASE WHEN @LocalDate BETWEEN @DSTStartDate AND @DSTEndDate THEN 1 ELSE 0 END

--====================================================
--Finally add the DST Offset 
--====================================================
RETURN DATEADD(hh, @DaylightSavingOffset, @LocalDate)
END



GO

Notes:

This is for North American servers that observer Daylight Saving Time. Please change the variable @Offest to the Timezone offset of the server running the SQL function (While NOT Observing the Daylight Savings time)...

--====================================================
--Set the Timezone Offset (NOT During DST [Daylight Saving Time])
--====================================================
DECLARE @Offset AS SMALLINT
SET @Offset = -5

As the DST rules change update them here...

--Get First Possible DST StartDay
IF (@Year > 2006) SET @DSTStartDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-03-08 02:00:00'
ELSE              SET @DSTStartDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-04-01 02:00:00'
--Get DST StartDate 
WHILE (DATENAME(dw, @DSTStartDate) <> 'sunday') SET @DSTStartDate = DATEADD(day, 1,@DSTStartDate)


--Get First Possible DST EndDate
IF (@Year > 2006) SET @DSTEndDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-11-01 02:00:00'
ELSE              SET @DSTEndDate = CAST(@Year AS CHAR(4)) + '-10-25 02:00:00'
--Get DST EndDate 
WHILE (DATENAME(dw, @DSTEndDate) <> 'sunday') SET @DSTEndDate = DATEADD(day,1,@DSTEndDate)

Cheers,

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1  
Thank you very much for sharing this! –  Rachel Nov 27 '12 at 19:03

This solution seems too obvious.

If you can get UTC Date with GETUTCDATE() and you can get your local date with GETDATE() you have an offset that you can apply for any datetime

SELECT DATEADD(hh, DATEPART(hh, GETDATE() - GETUTCDATE()) - 24, GETUTCDATE()) 

this should return the local time you executed the query,

SELECT DATEADD(hh, DATEPART(hh, GETDATE() - GETUTCDATE()) - 24, N'1/14/2011 7:00:00'  ) 

this will return 2011-01-14 02:00:00.000 because i'm in UTC +5

Unless I'm missing something?

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14  
I don't think that will handle summer-time offsets –  Tomas Jun 28 '11 at 12:12
1  
Not to pile on gratuitously, but not only does this not handle summer-time (or daylight saving time), but it doesn't handle historical changes in time zones or calendars either. –  Kenny Evitt Jul 24 at 15:09

GETUTCDATE() just gives you the current time in UTC, any DATEADD() you do to this value will not include any daylight savings time shifts.

Your best bet is build your own UTC conversion table or just use something like this:

http://www.codeproject.com/KB/database/ConvertUTCToLocal.aspx

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1  
wow. I hope someone comes up and tell me that this isn't true that sql server can't do this? –  Michel Aug 4 '10 at 12:36
1  
SQL Server can't do it out of the box, you'll need to build your own function or populate your own look up table –  KM. Aug 4 '10 at 15:50

I recently had to do the same thing. The trick is figuring out the offset from UTC, but it's not a hard trick. You simply use DateDiff to get the difference in hours between local and UTC. I wrote a function to take care of this.

Create Function ConvertUtcDateTimeToLocal(@utcDateTime DateTime)
Returns DateTime
Begin
    Declare @utcNow DateTime
    Declare @localNow DateTime
    Declare @timeOffSet Int

    -- Figure out the time difference between UTC and Local time
    Set @utcNow = GetUtcDate()
    Set @localNow = GetDate()
    Set @timeOffSet = DateDiff(hh, @utcNow, @localNow) 

    DECLARE @localTime datetime 

    Set @localTime = DateAdd(hh, @timeOffset, @utcDateTime) 

    -- Check Results
    return @localTime 

End
GO

This does have on crucial short coming: If a time zone uses a fractional offset, such as Nepal which is GMT+5:45, this will fail because this only deals with whole hours. However, it should fit your needs just fine.

share|improve this answer
10  
Unfortunately this doesn't deal with daylight savings. The difference between GetDate() and GetUtcDate() is not constant throughout the year. –  Nik Mar 29 '11 at 15:26

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