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I'm using AutoMapper and I'd like it to trace back a source property based on the name of the mapped (flattened) destination property.

This is because my MVC controller has the name of a mapped property that it needs to provide to a service call that for sorting purposes. The service needs to know the name of the property that the mapping originated from (and the controller is not supposed to know it) in order to perform a proper call to the repository that actually sorts the data.

For example:

[Source.Address.ZipCode] maps to [Destination.AddressZipCode]

Then

Trace "AddressZipCode" back to [Source.Address.ZipCode]

Is this something that AutoMapper can do for me or do I need to resort to digging into AutoMapper's mapping data?

UPDATE

Jimmy Bogard told me that this should be possible but not in an obvious manner. It requires loading the type map and going through it. I've looked into it briefly but it seems that I need access to internal types to get to the property mapping information that is required to do reverse mapping.

UPDATE 2

I've decided to provide some more details.

When I load up the type map, I find that there are two source value resolvers in it for the implicit ZipCode mapping:

  • a AutoMapper.Internal.PropertyGetter that gets the Address.
  • a AutoMapper.Internal.PropertyGetter that gets the ZipCode.

When I have an explicit mapping (that has a lambda expression specified), I find no source value resolver but a custom resolver:

  • a AutoMapper.DelegateBasedResolver<Company,string> that I think holds my explicit mapping lambda expression.

Unfortunately these resolvers are internal so I can only access them through reflection (which I really don't want to do) or by changing the AutoMapper source code.

If I could access them, I could solve the problem by either walking through the value resolvers or by inspecting the custom resolver although I doubt it that would lead me back to the mapping lambda expression which I need to build the unflattened property name (actually a series of property names separated by dots).

share|improve this question
    
are you talking about flatenning/unflattening ? –  Omu Aug 4 '10 at 12:17
    
@Omu: yes I am, in the sense that I want to unflatten the property name, not entire objects. I see you are affiliated with ValueInjecter but I want to stay within the AutoMapper realm in this case. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Aug 4 '10 at 12:54
    
well, Automapper can't do that, but I did that when doing unflattening for the ValueInjecter –  Omu Aug 4 '10 at 13:37
    
Any progress?? Did You managed to get this working? –  Tadeusz Wójcik Nov 1 '10 at 23:23
    
Please see my answer below: stackoverflow.com/questions/3405149/… –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Nov 2 '10 at 10:37

4 Answers 4

up vote 4 down vote accepted

For the time being, I wrote a helper class that can determine the originating property chain from a concatenated property chain. Ofcourse, this will become obsolete when AutoMapper gets a feature to do this kind of thing.

using System.Globalization;
using System.Reflection;

/// <summary>
///     Resolves concatenated property names back to their originating properties.
/// </summary>
/// <remarks>
///     An example of a concatenated property name is "ProductNameLength" where the originating
///     property would be "Product.Name.Length".
/// </remarks>
public static class ConcatenatedPropertyNameResolver
{
    private static readonly object mappingCacheLock = new object();
    private static readonly Dictionary<MappingCacheKey, string> mappingCache = new Dictionary<MappingCacheKey, string>();

    /// <summary>
    ///     Returns the nested name of the property the specified concatenated property
    ///     originates from.
    /// </summary>
    /// <param name="concatenatedPropertyName">The concatenated property name.</param>
    /// <typeparam name="TSource">The mapping source type.</typeparam>
    /// <typeparam name="TDestination">The mapping destination type.</typeparam>
    /// <returns>
    ///     The nested name of the originating property where each level is separated by a dot.
    /// </returns>
    public static string GetOriginatingPropertyName<TSource, TDestination>(string concatenatedPropertyName)
    {
        if (concatenatedPropertyName == null)
        {
            throw new ArgumentNullException("concatenatedPropertyName");
        }
        else if (concatenatedPropertyName.Length == 0)
        {
            throw new ArgumentException("Cannot be empty.", "concatenatedPropertyName");
        }

        lock (mappingCacheLock)
        {
            MappingCacheKey key = new MappingCacheKey(typeof(TSource), typeof(TDestination), concatenatedPropertyName);

            if (!mappingCache.ContainsKey(key))
            {
                BindingFlags bindingFlags = BindingFlags.Instance | BindingFlags.Public;

                List<string> result = new List<string>();
                Type type = typeof(TSource);

                while (concatenatedPropertyName.Length > 0)
                {
                    IEnumerable<PropertyInfo> properties = type.GetProperties(bindingFlags).Where(
                        n => concatenatedPropertyName.StartsWith(n.Name)).ToList();

                    if (properties.Count() == 1)
                    {
                        string match = properties.First().Name;
                        result.Add(match);
                        concatenatedPropertyName = concatenatedPropertyName.Substring(match.Length);
                        type = type.GetProperty(match, bindingFlags).PropertyType;
                    }
                    else if (properties.Any())
                    {
                        throw new InvalidOperationException(
                            string.Format(
                                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
                                "Ambiguous properties found for {0} on type {1}: {2}.",
                                concatenatedPropertyName,
                                typeof(TSource).FullName,
                                string.Join(", ", properties.Select(n => n.Name))));
                    }
                    else
                    {
                        throw new InvalidOperationException(
                            string.Format(
                                CultureInfo.InvariantCulture,
                                "No matching property found for {0} on type {1}.",
                                concatenatedPropertyName,
                                typeof(TSource).FullName));
                    }
                }

                mappingCache.Add(key, string.Join(".", result));
            }

            return mappingCache[key];
        }
    }

    /// <summary>
    ///     A mapping cache key.
    /// </summary>
    private struct MappingCacheKey
    {
        /// <summary>
        ///     The source type.
        /// </summary>
        public Type SourceType;

        /// <summary>
        ///     The destination type the source type maps to. 
        /// </summary>
        public Type DestinationType;

        /// <summary>
        ///     The name of the mapped property.
        /// </summary>
        public string MappedPropertyName;

        /// <summary>
        ///     Initializes a new instance of the <see cref="MappingCacheKey"/> class.
        /// </summary>
        /// <param name="sourceType">The source type.</param>
        /// <param name="destinationType">The destination type the source type maps to.</param>
        /// <param name="mappedPropertyName">The name of the mapped property.</param>
        public MappingCacheKey(Type sourceType, Type destinationType, string mappedPropertyName)
        {
            SourceType = sourceType;
            DestinationType = destinationType;
            MappedPropertyName = mappedPropertyName;
        }
    }
}

Here's a usage example:

class TestEntity
{
    public Node Root {get; set;}
}

class Node
{
    public string Leaf {get; set;}
}

class TestFlattenedEntity
{
    public string RootLeaf {get; set;}
}

string result = ConcatenatedPropertyNameResolver.GetOriginatingPropertyName<TestEntity, TestFlattenedEntity>("RootLeaf");

Assert.AreEqual("Root.Leaf", result);
share|improve this answer
    
but that is not using automapper? –  redsquare Nov 2 '10 at 11:24
    
That's right, it's something I use until AutoMapper provides a proper way of doing it (and according to Jimmy - the author of AutoMapper - it currently doesn't. I've updated the answer to reflect this. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Nov 2 '10 at 11:26
    
Dang, I really need this at the moment, I am willing to change the automapper source code - but it seems this is beyond me at the moment!! –  redsquare Nov 2 '10 at 11:29

I ran into a similar need with AutoMapper. Here is the solution that I can up with. I have only tested this against very simple mappings. Mainly one class to another with only properties being used (basically the default behavior of Mapper.CreateMap. I am assuming that there is only one mapping, so I use First instead of iterating over the collections.

    private MemberInfo getSource(Type destinationType, string destinationPropertyname)
    {
        TypeMap map = Mapper.GetAllTypeMaps().Where(m => m.DestinationType.Equals(destinationType)).First();

        IEnumerable<PropertyMap> properties = map.GetPropertyMaps().Where(p => p.DestinationProperty.Name.Equals(destinationPropertyname, StringComparison.CurrentCultureIgnoreCase));

        PropertyMap sourceProperty = properties.First();

        IMemberGetter mg = sourceProperty.GetSourceValueResolvers().Cast<IMemberGetter>().First();

        return mg.MemberInfo;
    }
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks sgriffinusa. You know, the thing is that the core of my problem is that I need to resolve back a property that has been flattened. In my case, the value of destinationPropertyname is Address.ZipCode so that will never match any of the source properties directly. I've updated my question to provide more details. –  Sandor Drieënhuizen Aug 7 '10 at 9:40

I've been looking into the same problem, and came up with the following code snippet. It comes up with the unflattened property chain from AutoMapper. I got some inspiration from sgriffinusa's solution.

using System.Linq;
using System.Reflection;
using AutoMapper;

public static class TypeMapExtensions
{
    public static MemberInfo[] TryGetSourceProperties(this TypeMap @this, string propertyName)
    {
        if (@this != null)
        {
            var propertyMap = @this.GetPropertyMaps()
                .Where(p => p.DestinationProperty.Name == propertyName).FirstOrDefault();

            if (propertyMap != null)
            {
                var sourceProperties = propertyMap.GetSourceValueResolvers().OfType<IMemberGetter>();
                if (sourceProperties.Any())
                    return sourceProperties.Select(x => x.MemberInfo).ToArray();
            }
        }
        return null;
    }

    /// <summary>
    /// Trys to retrieve a source property name, given a destination property name. Only handles simple property mappings, and flattened properties.
    /// </summary>
    public static string TryGetSourcePropertyName(this TypeMap @this, string propertyName)
    {
        var members = TryGetSourceProperties(@this, propertyName);
        return (members == null) ? null : string.Join(".", members.Select(x => x.Name).ToArray());
    }
}

And you get the desired TypeMap using:

Mapper.FindTypeMapFor<TSource, TDestination>();
share|improve this answer

with ValueInjecter you could do:

var trails = TrailFinder.GetTrails(flatPropertyName, target.GetType().GetInfos(), t => true);

target is the unflat object (we need to pass the collection of PropertyInfo)

trails will be a list of strings so

var result = string.join(".",trails.ToArray());
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