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I would like to divide a large byte array into smaller chunks (say 64 bytes). Please help me with this.

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1  
Sounds similar to stackoverflow.com/questions/3395547/… – Markus Kull Aug 4 '10 at 12:44

You can use the method Arrays.copyOfRange(original, from, to)

 public static byte[][] divideArray(byte[] source, int chunksize) {


        byte[][] ret = new byte[(int)Math.ceil(source.length / (double)chunksize)][chunksize];

        int start = 0;

        for(int i = 0; i < ret.length; i++) {
            ret[i] = Arrays.copyOfRange(source,start, start + chunksize);
            start += chunksize ;
        }

        return ret;
    }

Or You can use as Max suggested the System.arraycopy

public static byte[][] divideArray(byte[] source, int chunksize) {


        byte[][] ret = new byte[(int)Math.ceil(source.length / (double)chunksize)][chunksize];

        int start = 0;

        for(int i = 0; i < ret.length; i++) {
            if(start + chunksize > source.length) {
                System.arraycopy(source, start, ret[i], 0, source.length - start);
            } else {
                System.arraycopy(source, start, ret[i], 0, chunksize);
            }
            start += chunksize ;
        }


        return ret;
    }
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it really helpful to me. thanks – Hiren Dabhi Jul 21 '12 at 7:32
    
Beware that the second of these appears to allocate a "too large" of last chunk if source.length is not an even multiple of the chunksize... – rogerdpack May 6 '15 at 23:45

Damian Vash's first method (the one using Arrays.copyOfRange()) adds zeros to the end of the last chunk if the input is not exactly a multiple of chunksize.

You might want to use this instead:

public static List<byte[]> divideArray(byte[] source, int chunksize) {

    List<byte[]> result = new ArrayList<byte[]>();
    int start = 0;
    while (start < source.length) {
        int end = Math.min(source.length, start + chunksize);
        result.add(Arrays.copyOfRange(source, start, end));
        start += chunksize;
    }

    return result;
}

and in case it's useful, the same thing using ArrayList's:

  public static List<List<String>> divideList(List<String> source, int chunksize) {
    List<List<String>> result = new ArrayList<List<String>>();
    int start = 0;
    while (start < source.size()) {
      int end = Math.min(source.size(), start + chunksize);
      result.add(source.subList(start, end));
      start += chunksize;
    }
    return result;
  }
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Well, System.arraycopy(src, fromPos, dest, toPos, length) is generally considered faster than Arrays.copyOfRange.

byte[] source = ...read it from somewhere...;
byte[] newArray = new byte[64];
System.arraycopy(source, 0, newArray, 0, 64);
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4  
This is incorrect: it's not a matter of being faster, Arrays.copyOfRange also allocates a new array while System.arraycopy just copy elements in another array passed as parameter. So with second one you save the allocation.. that's why it is faster. If you check the definition of Array.copyOfRange you will see that it invokes System.arraycopy.. – Jack Aug 4 '10 at 12:41
    
Yup, just checked, you are right. – bezmax Aug 4 '10 at 12:54

If you are looking save some memory, a slight modification to Damian Vash's answer would help (in this case any remaining chunk is not allocated a complete 64 byte block size, as well...)

private byte[][] splitChunks(byte[] source)
{
    byte[][] ret = new byte[(int)Math.ceil(source.length / (double)CHUNK_SIZE)][];
    int start = 0;
    for(int i = 0; i < ret.length; i++) {
        if(start + CHUNK_SIZE > source.length) {
            ret[i] = new byte[source.length-start];
            System.arraycopy(source, start, ret[i], 0, source.length - start);
        } 
        else {
            ret[i] = new byte[CHUNK_SIZE];
            System.arraycopy(source, start, ret[i], 0, CHUNK_SIZE);
        }
        start += CHUNK_SIZE ;
    }
    return ret;
}
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You have two choices:

  • System.arraycopy(...)
  • Array.copyOfRange(...)

both of them work the same way but while first one only manages copy, second one is meant to be used to allocate the new chunk at the same time.

I benchmarked them with a result that System.arraycopy is faster if you manage to allocate chunks all together before splitting your array but slightly slower if you allocate them whle you copy: in this case you should use Array.copyOfRange.

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Very interesting benchmark given that Array.copyOfRange() calls System.arraycopy: pastebin.com/SpSyx8Cd – bezmax Aug 4 '10 at 12:56

See Arrays.copyOfRange for help. You could use this in a loop to split your array into several smaller chunks.

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This will do...

    byte[] source = new byte[2048];
    byte[] target = new byte[1024];  

// fill source with some data...

    Array.Copy(source, buffer, 1024);
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