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How do you define a field, eg email as having an index using JPA annotations. We need a non-unique key on email because there are literally millions of queries on this field per day, and its a bit slow without the key.

@Entity
@Table(name="person", 
       uniqueConstraints=@UniqueConstraint(columnNames={"code", "uid"}))
public class Person {
    // Unique on code and uid
    public String code;
    public String uid;

    public String username;
    public String name;
    public String email;
}

I have seen a hibernate specific annotation but I am trying to avoid vendor specific solutions as we are still deciding between hibernate and datanucleus.

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9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

As far as I know, there isn't a cross-JPA-Provider way to specify indexes. However, you can always create them by hand directly in the database, most databases will pick them up automatically during query planning.

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1  
lol, thats assuming you have DBA's that do the job of a DBA (: –  Jacob Aug 4 '10 at 12:11
3  
I find it slightly odd that there is a way to do "unique" but not a way to do an index. –  Jacob Aug 4 '10 at 12:11
5  
@Jacob - Well it is important to know at the application level whether some field will be unique or not. Indexes, on the other hand, are for the purposes of optimizing the db access. There is no need (as far as I see) to know whether a column is an index or not at the java layer. Like you said, the DBA can set up an index if it seems that a particular column would benefit from it. –  Java Drinker Aug 4 '10 at 12:21
    
@Jacob, there's no Index suport because that is simply an optimization (usually an important one, but still an optimization). OTOH if a field (or set of fields) is unique or not depends on the model, and will affect correctness. Also, no need for a fully-fledged 200USD/Hr DBA, some simple index creation statements usually suffice. –  Tassos Bassoukos Aug 4 '10 at 13:45

JPA 2.1 (finally) adds support for indexes and foreign keys! See this blog for details. Since JPA 2.1 is a part of Java EE 7, which is in theory due out this month (ha ha), I imagine it will be released shortly.

If you like living on the edge, you can get the latest snapshot for eclipselink from their maven repository (groupId:org.eclipse.persistence, artifactId:eclipselink, version:2.5.0-SNAPSHOT). For just the JPA annotations (which should work with any provider once they support 2.1) use artifactID:javax.persistence, version:2.1.0-SNAPSHOT.

I'm using it for a project which won't be finished until after its release, and I haven't noticed any horrible problems (although I'm not doing anything too complex with it).

UPDATE (26 Sep 2013): Nowadays release and release candidate versions of eclipselink are available in the central (main) repository, so you no longer have to add the eclipselink repository in Maven projects. The latest release version is 2.5.0 but 2.5.1-RC3 is also present. I'd switch over to 2.5.1 ASAP because of issues with the 2.5.0 release (the modelgen stuff doesn't work).

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With JPA 2.1 you should be able to do it.

import javax.persistence.Column;
import javax.persistence.Entity;
import javax.persistence.Index;
import javax.persistence.Table;

@Entity
@Table(name = "region",
       indexes = {@Index(name = "my_index_name",  columnList="iso_code", unique = true),
                  @Index(name = "my_index_name2", columnList="name",     unique = false)})
public class Region{

    @Column(name = "iso_code", nullable = false)
    private String isoCode;

    @Column(name = "name", nullable = false)
    private String name;

} 
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Thanks to Alvin for his answer. (+1 vote). But I had to look for a few things a I hope this example may make your life easier –  borjab Mar 26 at 11:04

I'd really like to be able to specify database indexes in a standardized way but, sadly, this is not part of the JPA specification (maybe because DDL generation support is not required by the JPA specification, which is a kind of road block for such a feature).

So you'll have to rely on a provider specific extension for that. Hibernate, OpenJPA and EclipseLink clearly do offer such an extension. I can't confirm for DataNucleus but since indexes definition is part of JDO, I guess it does.

I really hope index support will get standardized in next versions of the specification and thus somehow disagree with other answers, I don't see any good reason to not include such a thing in JPA (especially since the database is not always under your control) for optimal DDL generation support.

By the way, I suggest downloading the JPA 2.0 spec.

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OpenJPA allows you to specify non-standard annotation to define index on property.

Details are here.

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To sum up the other answers:

  • Hibernate: org.hibernate.annotations.Index
  • OpenJPA: org.apache.openjpa.persistence.jdbc.Index
  • EclipseLink: org.eclipse.persistence.annotations.Index

I would just go for one of them. It will come with JPA 2.1 anyway and should not be too hard to change in the case that you really want to switch your JPA provider.

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EclipseLink provided an annotation (e.g. @Index) to define an index on columns. There is an example of its use. Part of the example is included...

The firstName and lastName fields are indexed, together and individually.

@Entity
@Index(name="EMP_NAME_INDEX", columnNames={"F_NAME","L_NAME"})  // Columns indexed together
public class Employee{
    @Id
    private long id;

    @Index                      // F_NAME column indexed
    @Column(name="F_NAME")
    private String firstName;

    @Index                      // F_NAME column indexed
    @Column(name="L_NAME")
    private String lastName;
    ...
}
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It's not possible to do that using JPA annotation. And this make sense: where a UniqueConstraint clearly define a business rules, an index is just a way to make search faster. So this should really be done by a DBA.

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This solution is for EclipseLink 2.5, and it works (tested):

@Table(indexes = {@Index(columnList="mycol1"), @Index(columnList="mycol2")})
@Entity
public class myclass implements Serializable{
      private String mycol1;
      private String mycol2;
}

This assumes ascendant order.

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