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I'm using Spring to inject the path to a directory into my unit tests. Inside this directory are a number of files that should be used to generate test data for parameterized test cases using the Parameterized test runner. Unfortunately, the test runner requires that the method that provides the parameters be static. This doesn't work for my situation because the directory can only be injected into a non-static field. Any ideas how I can get around this?

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2  
Can you change to another mechanism to inject a string into a test-fixture ? I mean the bottleneck here seems to be that Spring can't set non-static fields/ – Gishu Aug 4 '10 at 12:27
    
Gishu: <util:constant> sets static fields, no? Maybe not in JUnit because the order or execution would have the @Parameters method called before Spring. But in general? – Jeanne Boyarsky Aug 5 '10 at 1:38
up vote 6 down vote accepted

I assume you are using JUnit 4.X since you mentioned the Parameterized test runner. This implies you aren't using @RunWith(SpringJUnit4ClassRunner). Not a problem, just listing my assumptions.

The following uses Spring to get the test files directory from the XML file. It doesn't inject it, but the data is still available to your test. And in a static method no less.

The only disadvantage I see is that it may mean your Spring config is getting parsed/configured multiple times. You could load just a smaller file with test specific info if need be.

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class MyTest {
    @Parameters
    public static Collection<Object[]> data() {
        ApplicationContext ctx = new ClassPathXmlApplicationContext("/jeanne/jeanne.xml");
        String dir = ctx.getBean("testFilesDirectory", String.class);

            // write java code to link files in test directory to the array
        return Arrays.asList(new Object[][] { { 1 } });
    }
// rest of test class
}
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Good idea. I forget completely about just getting the ApplicationContext manually. It makes the code a bit uglier, but it makes the test output infinitely better to be able to used Parameterized. – scompt.com Aug 6 '10 at 9:42

You can use a TestContextManager from Spring. In this example, I'm using Theories instead of Parameterized.

@RunWith(Theories.class)
@ContextConfiguration(locations = "classpath:/spring-context.xml")
public class SeleniumCase {
  @DataPoints
  public static WebDriver[] drivers() {
    return new WebDriver[] { firefoxDriver, internetExplorerDriver };
  }

  private TestContextManager testContextManager;

  @Autowired
  SomethingDao dao;

  private static FirefoxDriver firefoxDriver = new FirefoxDriver();
  private static InternetExplorerDriver internetExplorerDriver = new InternetExplorerDriver();

  @AfterClass
  public static void tearDown() {
    firefoxDriver.close();
    internetExplorerDriver.close();
  }

  @Before
  public void setUpStringContext() throws Exception {
    testContextManager = new TestContextManager(getClass());
    testContextManager.prepareTestInstance(this);
  }

  @Theory
  public void testWork(WebDriver driver) {
    assertNotNull(driver);
    assertNotNull(dao);
  }
}

I found this solution here : How to do Parameterized/Theories tests with Spring

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I use the following solution with the Parameterized.class without any problem: http://bmocanu.ro/coding/320/combining-junit-theoriesparameterized-tests-with-spring/

@ContextConfiguration(value = "classpath:test-context.xml")
public abstract class AbstractJunitTest extends AbstractJUnit4SpringContextTests {
    private static TestContextManager testContextManager = null;
    private static DAOFactory daoFactory = null;

    @Before
    public void initApplicationContext() throws Exception {
        if (testContextManager == null) {
            testContextManager = new TestContextManager(getClass());
            testContextManager.prepareTestInstance(this);
            daoFactory = (DAOFactory)applicationContext.getBean("daoFactory");
        }
    }

    protected DAOFactory getDaoFactory() throws Exception {
        return daoFactory;
    }
}



@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class SomeTestClass extends AbstractJunitTest {
     ...
}
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It's enough to annotate test class with @RunWith(Parameterized.class) and @ContextConfiguration, use @Autowired for dependency injection and use TestContextManager in constructor for initialization, e.g.:

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
@ContextConfiguration(classes = TestConfig.class)
public class MyTest {

    @Autowired
    private DataSource dataSource;

    private final int param;

    @Parameterized.Parameters
    public static List<Object[]> params() {
        return Arrays.asList(new Object[][]{
            {1},
            {2},
        });
    }

    public MyTest(int p) {
        this.param = p;
        new TestContextManager(getClass()).prepareTestInstance(this);
    }

    @Test
    public void testSomething() {
       …
    }
}
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As a heads up, remember you can't use injected beans (dataSource in this example) as a parameter source. @Parameterized.Parameters method needs to be static. – Michał Minicki Apr 21 '15 at 20:38

For someone reading this late 2015 or later, Spring 4.2 has, in addition to SpringJUnit4ClassRunner added SpringClassRule and SpringMethodRule which leverage the support for Spring TestContext Framework.

This means first class support for any Runner like MockitoJUnitRunner or Parameterized:

@RunWith(Parameterized.class)
public class FibonacciTest {
    @ClassRule public static final SpringClassRule SCR = new SpringClassRule();
    @Rule public final SpringMethodRule springMethodRule = new SpringMethodRule();

    long input;
    long output;

    public FibonacciTest(long input, long output) { this.input = input; ...} 

    @Test
    public void testFibonacci() {
        Assert.assertEquals(output, fibonacci(input));
    }

    public List<Long[]> params() {
        return Arrays.asList(new Long[][] { {0, 0}, {1, 1} });
    }
}
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Remember that Spring inject using @Autowired, but also with setter. So instead of using @Autowired, use the setter:

private static String directory;

public void setDirectory(String directory) {
    this.directory = directory;
}

public static String getDirectory() {
     return directory;
}
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