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Please refer the code below:

typedef void (*TimerCallback)(int RequestID_in, void* AdditionalParameter_in);
class  MyTimer
{
    public:
        MyTimer(){}
        bool schedule( int Interval_in, TimerCallback TimerCallback_in, void* AdditionalParameter_in)
        {
            //some logic
            return true;
        }
};

namespace
{
    template <class T>
    void myTimerFunc(int RequestID_in, void* AdditionalParameter_in)
    {
        MyLogic<T>* pLogic = static_cast<MyLogic<T>*>(AdditionalParameter_in);
        if(pLogic)
        {
            //do something
        }
    }
}

template <class T>
class MyLogic
{
public:
    MyLogic(){}

    void testMe()
    {
        MyTimer aTimer;
        aTimer.schedule(10, myTimerFunc<T>, this);
    }
};

int main()
{
    MyLogic<int> myLogic;
    myLogic.testMe();
}

I am using VC6 compiler and the compiler throws following error:

error C2664: 'schedule' : cannot convert parameter 2 from 'void (int,void *)' to 'void (__cdecl *)(int,void *)' None of the functions with this name in scope match the target type E:\test\BTest\BTest.cpp(46) : while compiling class-template member function 'void __thiscall MyLogic::testMe(void)'

I tested this code in Visual Studio 2008 and it works fine without any issues.

I know VC6 is an outdated compiler but my project source code(legacy) is still compiled with VC6.

Hence, any work around possible to make this code compile?

share|improve this question
    
with tag "6" you mean VC6? –  codymanix Aug 4 '10 at 13:02
    
yes. I will change. –  aJ. Aug 4 '10 at 13:06
    
with &myTimerFunc<T>, does it work ? –  Scharron Aug 4 '10 at 13:13
    
@Scharron, no. it didn't help –  aJ. Aug 4 '10 at 13:20
2  
aJ: You should update your compiler. VC6 is notorious for bugs and poor Standard support. –  Puppy Aug 4 '10 at 13:38

2 Answers 2

All version of Visual Studio I've encountered get seizures when they have to resolve/convert template functions into function pointers. The workaround I use, is to use a id() function which returns its argument unchanged:

template<class T>
T id(T t) 
{
    return t;
}

template <class T>
class MyLogic
{
public:
    MyLogic(){}

    void testMe()
    {
        MyTimer aTimer;
        aTimer.schedule(10, id(myTimerFunc<T>), this);
        //------------------^^(              )
    }
};

This compiles under Visual Studio 6. Please note, that the type of myTimerFunc does not change here, it merely helps the compiler to resolve things.

share|improve this answer
    
Not all versions. This code compiles fine on VS2010 and I expect that it would do on VS2008 too. –  Puppy Aug 4 '10 at 13:38
    
VS2010 is terrific, so they've sorted this out probably. For 2008, look here: stackoverflow.com/questions/3395468/… A similar problem (conversion of template function to function pointer). OP choosed my workaround for answer. Also, I'm not saying that every version falls for the same code. It's just my experience, that these kind of conversion tend to be problematic with VS. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 4 '10 at 13:43
    
Also, an explanation for the downvote would be nice. My statement was subjective ("All I've encountered") and made no assertions about all versions of VS. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 4 '10 at 13:48

I believe you're missing an __stdcall in there:

typedef void (__stdcall *TimerCallback)(int RequestID_in, void* AdditionalParameter_in);

I'm not sure why, but that's what the error message is suggesting. Perhaps you've got a compiler parameter that's telling it to assume __stdcall instead of __cdecl, or vice versa.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, even with default calling convention __cdecl this happend. The compiler just doesn't get anymore that void (__cdecl *)(int,void*) is the same type as void (*)(int,void*) –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 4 '10 at 13:27
    
Did you try setting __cdecl on that function manually? –  Puppy Aug 4 '10 at 13:36
    
That doesn't work either. I fired up VS6 with OP's code to check this too. It's a compiler bug - See my answer. –  Nordic Mainframe Aug 4 '10 at 13:39
    
That'll do it. :-( I don't have VS6 anymore (thank God, we moved our last VS6 project to VS2005 a few years ago), so I could only go by the error message. –  Head Geek Aug 4 '10 at 15:05

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