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It is not possible to fire an event in C# that has no handlers attached to it. So before each call it is necessary to check if the event is null.

if ( MyEvent != null ) {
  MyEvent( param1, param2 );
}

I would like to keep my code as clean as possible and get rid of those null checks. I don't think it will affect performance very much, at least not in my case.

MyEvent( param1, param2 );

Right now I solve this by adding an empty inline handler to each event manually. This is error prone, since I need to remember to do that etc.

void Initialize() {
  MyEvent += new MyEvent( (p1,p2) => { } );
}

Is there a way to generate empty handlers for all events of a given class automatically using reflection and some CLR magic?

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the trick in the accepted answer will avoid having to check for null but will not ensure thread safty. see here: stackoverflow.com/questions/1131184/… –  user316976 Apr 14 '10 at 21:41

7 Answers 7

up vote 97 down vote accepted

I saw this on another post and have shamelessly stolen it and used it in much of my code ever since:

public delegate void MyClickHandler(object sender, string myValue);
public event MyClickHandler Click = delegate {}; // add empty delegate!

//Let you do this:
public void DoSomething() {
    Click(this, "foo");
}

//Instead of this:
public void DoSomething() {
    if (Click != null) // Unnecessary!
        Click(this, "foo");
}

* If anyone knows the origin of this technique, please post it in the comments. I really do believe in the source getting due credit.

(Edit: I got it from this post Hidden Features of C#?)

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24 seconds faster! –  leppie Dec 4 '08 at 13:46
2  
Add empty delegate, right there! That's even better than I was hoping for. Thanks! I'm going to read the "hidden features" post right now. –  TomA Dec 4 '08 at 14:02
    
Yes -- That post is priceless! Be sure to vote often there. They've done us all a great service. –  Dinah Dec 4 '08 at 14:04
2  
lol. I think i just cut about 300 lines from my codebase! –  Stimul8d Dec 11 '09 at 10:35
2  
-1 for two reasons: 1) this technique incurs both runtime performance and memory overhead and 2) this technique is error prone, especially compared to the extension method described below. Looking at the invocation site alone is not enough to determine the correctness of this method, but the extension method works for all events whether or not the event was initialized with an empty delegate. –  Sam Harwell May 5 '13 at 19:17

The notation:

if ( MyEvent != null ) {
  MyEvent( param1, param2 );
}

is not thread safe. You should do it this way:

EventHandler handler = this.MyEvent;
if ( null != handler ) { handler( param1, param2 ); }

I understand, that this is a bother, so you can do helper method:

static void RaiseEvent( EventHandler handler, object sender, EventArgs e ) {
    if ( null != handler ) { handler( sender, e ); }
}

and then call:

RaiseEvent( MyEvent, param1, param2 );

If you are using C# 3.0, you can declare helper method as extension method:

static void Raise( this EventHandler handler, object sender, EventArgs e ) {
    if ( null != handler ) { handler( sender, e ); }
}

and then call:

MyEvent.Raise( param1, param2 );

Also you can create next extension/helper methods for other event handlers. For example:

static void Raise<TEventArgs>( this EventHandler<TEventArgs> handler,
    object sender, TEventArgs e ) where TEventArgs : EventArgs
{
    if ( null != handler ) { handler( sender, e ); }
}
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4  
Using an extension method is a beautiful solution. I cringe when the notion of initializing an empty delegate is put forth. –  Greg Apr 15 '10 at 14:54
    
Wow, I thought the = delegate {} was handy when I saw it for the first time. This is +1 awesome, though. And so obvious with hindsight, dammit :) –  shambulator Jun 25 '10 at 20:38
    
+1 for the Extension methods –  Wahid Bitar Jan 29 '13 at 19:42

You can write is as:

MyEvent += delegate { };

I am not sure what you want to do is correct.

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I realy believe, that adding empty delegate to EVERY event is right way, how to develop applications. But I believe, there can be situation, where is the quick & easy solution how to handle something. –  TcKs Dec 4 '08 at 13:55

You don't need several extension methods for different event handlers, you just need one:

public static class EventHandlerExtensions {
  public static void Raise<T>(this EventHandler<T> handler, object sender, T args) where T : EventArgs {
    if (handler != null) handler(sender, args);
  }
}
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Thank you Sandro! –  vkelman Mar 8 '11 at 18:49

This is a bad idea in that the code which is consuming the event now has an expectation that the object with the event has been coded with an action by default. If your code is never going to be used anywhere else by anyone else then I guess you can get away with it.

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I agree, as I commented on leppie's answer. +1 –  TcKs Dec 4 '08 at 13:57

C# event declarations unfortunately include a number of well-known safety problems and inefficiencies. I designed a number of extension methods on delegates to invoke them safely, and to register/unregister delegates in a thread-safe manner.

Your old event-raising code:

if (someDelegate != null) someDelegate(x, y, z);

Your new code:

someDelegate.Raise(x, y, z);

Your old event registration code:

event Action fooEvent;
...
lock (someDummyObject) fooEvent += newHandler;

Your new code:

Action fooEvent;
...
Events.Add(ref fooEvent, newHandler);

No locking needed, no compiler-inserted dummy objects used to lock the events.

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You can use PostSharp to on build time add this magic. It is the best way.

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