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I was just setting up the validation for a form in which I decided to try using the filter_var function to check the validity of my email address. I can not find out what filter_var actually allows anywhere though (since the documentation is very simple), and I found out that it is allowing an email address like test@test. Doesn't there have to be a .com, .net etc... in the domain?

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7  
Technically, test could be a valid host name in a local network so I assume it's correct. –  Pekka 웃 Aug 4 '10 at 14:26
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Can you please post your code ? var_dump(filter_var('test@test.', FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL)); returns false for me ! –  Youssef Aug 4 '10 at 14:31
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test@test without the dot returns false too –  Youssef Aug 4 '10 at 14:33
    
You can see the implementation here: svn.php.net/viewvc/php/php-src/trunk/ext/filter/… –  Artefacto Aug 4 '10 at 14:34
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filter_var('test@test.de', FILTER_VALIDATE_EMAIL) is not valid. The behavior must have changed. –  reggie Jun 19 '13 at 7:48
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4 Answers

up vote 16 down vote accepted

The behavior has changed somewhere around April. See bug #49576 and revision 297350.

That e-mail is indeed invalid, or at least that's what the PHP developers understood. The source carries this notice:

/*
 * The regex below is based on a regex by Michael Rushton.
 * However, it is not identical.  I changed it to only consider routeable
 * addresses as valid.  Michael's regex considers a@b a valid address
 * which conflicts with section 2.3.5 of RFC 5321 which states that:
 *
 *   Only resolvable, fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs) are permitted
 *   when domain names are used in SMTP.  In other words, names that can
 *   be resolved to MX RRs or address (i.e., A or AAAA) RRs (as discussed
 *   in Section 5) are permitted, as are CNAME RRs whose targets can be
 *   resolved, in turn, to MX or address RRs.  Local nicknames or
 *   unqualified names MUST NOT be used.

The changelog mentions this bug fix for PHP 5.3.3 and PHP 5.2.14.

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The ticket for this bug is marked fixed as of PHP5.3.3 and PHP5.2.14 –  Gordon Aug 4 '10 at 14:48
    
Great catch Artefacto. So I assume the rules have changed? Why has this changed? I wish they would explain what they are checking in the filter_var documentation. So will this return true before 5.3.3 and false after 5.3.3? The system I am using this on is 5.2.12 –  Metropolis Aug 4 '10 at 14:49
    
@Metro It checks the e-mail for compliance with Internet standards. The fact test@test was allowed before was a bug. –  Artefacto Aug 4 '10 at 14:52
    
@artefacto So what is the most full proof way to check for this in versions before 5.3.3 and 5.2.14? –  Metropolis Aug 4 '10 at 14:59
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@Metropolis you can take the RegEx pattern from rev 297350 and make it into a custom validator function or use it directly with FILTER_VALIDATE_REGEXP then. –  Gordon Aug 4 '10 at 15:04
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It is a valid email address. It isn't going to work on the Internet (at least, not today), but it is fine for a local address.

I would assume that the developers are taking the sensible approach to checking email addresses and not building themselves a system that is guaranteed to go out of date as soon as a new TLD is introduced. We have enough email address syntax checkers that reject foo@example.museum as it is.

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Do you think section 2.3.5 of RFC 5321 doesn't apply? –  Artefacto Aug 4 '10 at 14:43
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test@test is syntactically valid.

From RFC 5321:

In the case of a top-level domain used by itself in an email address, a single string is used without any dots.

Only after this does it say:

Only resolvable, fully-qualified domain names (FQDNs) are permitted when domain names are used in SMTP. In other words, names that can be resolved to MX RRs or address (i.e., A or AAAA) RRs (as discussed in Section 5) are permitted, as are CNAME RRs whose targets can be resolved, in turn, to MX or address RRs. Local nicknames or unqualified names MUST NOT be used.

This does not necessarily preclude TLD-only domain names. In fact, run the following code:

checkdnsrr('ua', 'MX') // Returns true

getmxrr('ua', $array) // Returns true

TLD-only domain names (can) have MX records and are in use: http://www.to/ is an example. And here's some valid TLD-only domain name email addresses:

vince@ai

paul@io

root@km

joost@tk

admin@tt

hostmaster@ua

Source of example email addresses: Tony Finch – TLDs with MXs

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No, test can be a local / internal network domain, so that would work. I like it that it correctly validates wrikken@localhost when developing for instance.

A normal nonexistentdomain.foo would have the same problem. If you want to test whether something is delivarable to a host, use getmxrr (and it that fails fall back to gethostbyname()).

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So is it best to allow local addresses? Or should I use getmxrr along with it if I dont want to allow something like test@test? –  Metropolis Aug 4 '10 at 14:41
    
Wouldnt it be better to check using checkdnsrr? Because if their server is down, or something else, then getmxrr will return false. Right? –  Metropolis Aug 4 '10 at 14:44
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You would allow local addresses (mostly in known ip-ranges) if you want / expect to handle those. You could indeed use checkdnsrr('hostname','ANY'), didn't occur to me (although checking for either MX or A record (which should be the fallback if no MX was defined) would be more reliable: a registered domain may have no A & MX records, making them undeliverable). checkdnsrr / gethostbyname / getmxrr all use the same mechanism afaik, so if a DNS server is down or slow, it would fail / be slow for all options. –  Wrikken Aug 4 '10 at 15:03
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