Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

Update : For anyone wondering what I went with at the end - I divided the result-set into 4 and ran 4 instances of the same program with one argument each indicating what set to process. It did the trick for me. I also consider PP module. Though it worked, it prefer the same program. Please pitch in if this is a horrible implementation! Thanks..

Following is what my program does. Nothing memory intensive. It is serial processing and boring. Could you help me convert this to more efficient and exciting process? Say, I process 1000 records this way and with 4 threads, I can get it to run in 25% time!

I read articles on how python threading can be inefficient if done wrong. Even python creator says the same. So I am scared and while I am reading more about them, want to see if bright folks on here can steer me in the right direction. Muchos gracias!

def startProcessing(sernum, name):
    '''
    Bunch of statements depending on result,
    will write to database (one update statement)

    Try Catch blocks which upon failing,
    will call this function until the request succeeds.    
    '''

for record in result:
    startProc = startProcessing(str(record[0]), str(record[1]))
share|improve this question
6  
Python threads can't run at the same time due to the Global Interpreter Lock; you want new processes instead. Look at the multiprocessing module. – katrielalex Aug 4 '10 at 14:46
    
Oops, I thought thread module is all I needed, will research multiprocessing module. Thanks much! – ThinkCode Aug 4 '10 at 14:48
    
You can also look at Stackless Python implementation, Jython or IronPython, as they don't have GIL problem. – fuwaneko Aug 4 '10 at 14:53
    
I am not even sure if we have Jython/IronPython access. Just started with Python and don't want to complicate it. I will look at stackless Python though, thanks! – ThinkCode Aug 4 '10 at 14:55
    
@katrielalex - you should probably post that as an answer so it can be accepted. – Wayne Werner Aug 4 '10 at 16:14
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Python threads can't run at the same time due to the Global Interpreter Lock; you want new processes instead. Look at the multiprocessing module.

(I was instructed to post this as an answer =p.)

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.