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OK - I'm almost embarrassed posting this here (and I will delete if anyone votes to close) as it seems like a basic question.

Is this the correct way to round up to a multiple of a number in C++?

I know there are other questions related to this but I am specficially interested to know what is the best way to do this in C++:

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)
{
 if(multiple == 0)
 {
  return numToRound;
 }

 int roundDown = ( (int) (numToRound) / multiple) * multiple;
 int roundUp = roundDown + multiple; 
 int roundCalc = roundUp;
 return (roundCalc);
}

Update: Sorry I probably didn't make intention clear. Here are some examples:

roundUp(7, 100)
//return 100

roundUp(117, 100)
//return 200

roundUp(477, 100)
//return 500

roundUp(1077, 100)
//return 1100

roundUp(52, 20)
//return 60

roundUp(74, 30)
//return 90

EDIT: Thanks for all the replies. Here is what I went for:

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)  
{  
 if(multiple == 0)  
 {  
  return numToRound;  
 }  

 int remainder = numToRound % multiple; 
 if (remainder == 0)
  {
    return numToRound; 
  }

 return numToRound + multiple - remainder; 
}  
share|improve this question
1  
You have an error in your logic - let's say I want to round 4 up to the nearest multiple of 2. roundDown = (4/2) * 2 = 4; roundUp = 4 + 2; so roundCalc = 6. I'm assuming that you would want to return 4 in that case. –  Niki Yoshiuchi Aug 4 '10 at 15:24
6  
@David Relihan No reason to be embarrassed. We all learn. Thats what the site is here for :) –  Eric Dec 23 '12 at 16:17
    
this does not work for roundUp(30,30). It gives 60 as answer, it should still give 30 as answer.. –  bsobaid Mar 7 at 20:30
    
@bsobaid: Check out my answer at the bottom. It's slightly simpler than other solutions here, although those should work too –  Niklas B. Mar 7 at 22:04
    
@NiklasB. it's not at the bottom anymore, +1 from me - although it's identical to plinth's answer. I've used that formula 100 times before, don't know why I didn't think of it the day I left my answer. –  Mark Ransom Mar 7 at 22:30

24 Answers 24

up vote 70 down vote accepted

This works for positive numbers, not sure about negative. It only uses integer math.

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) 
{ 
 if(multiple == 0) 
 { 
  return numToRound; 
 } 

 int remainder = numToRound % multiple;
 if (remainder == 0)
  return numToRound;
 return numToRound + multiple - remainder;
}

Edit: Here's a version that works with negative numbers, if by "up" you mean a result that's always >= the input.

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) 
{ 
    if (multiple == 0) 
        return numToRound; 

    int remainder = abs(numToRound) % multiple;
    if (remainder == 0)
        return numToRound;
    if (numToRound < 0)
        return -(abs(numToRound) - remainder);
    return numToRound + multiple - remainder;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 In my opinion, definately the nicest and most readable solution. –  David Relihan Aug 4 '10 at 17:28
1  
Add if(number<0){ multiple = multiple*(-1); } at the start to round negative numbers in the right direction –  Josh Feb 3 '13 at 13:54
2  
@Josh: Why using multiplication? if(number<0) multiple = -multiple is easier. –  md5 Jun 27 '13 at 17:53
    
this does not work for roundUp(30,30). It gives 60 as answer, it should still give 30 as answer. –  bsobaid Mar 7 at 20:52
    
@bsobaid impossible. The if (remainder == 0) test should take care of that case. It works for me: ideone.com/Waol7B –  Mark Ransom Mar 7 at 21:04

This works when factor will always be positive:

int round_up(int num, int factor)
{
    return num + factor - 1 - (num - 1) % factor;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Looks to be the shortest case that handles the 'already-a-multiple' case. –  harningt Aug 20 '12 at 12:56
    
Best solution in terms of number of costly operations. It only uses a single divison and no multiplication –  Niklas B. Mar 9 at 6:41
    
You need to prevent a division by zero; if factor==0 you'll get an exception. I believe this one also fails when factor is negative. –  kingtorus Mar 10 at 23:58
    
Handling a factor of zero in a function like this seems like a basic layering error. It should be handled at a higher level, either an input sanitizer or exception handler. (Being positive-only is important to know though.) –  SilverbackNet Jun 14 at 21:05
    
round_up(0, 100) == 100 instead of 0 as in the accepted answer –  Gregory Sep 12 at 0:11

Without conditions:

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) 
{
   return ((numToRound + multiple - 1) / multiple) * multiple;
}

If multiple is a power of 2

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) 
{
   return (numToRound + multiple - 1) & ~(multiple - 1);
}

This works for negative numbers like rounding away from zero

share|improve this answer
2  
+1 for the power of 2 version. Very useful as it totally avoids the cost of multiplications, divisions or modulo. –  Nikos C. Nov 12 '13 at 13:46

This is a generalization of the problem of "how do I find out how many bytes n bits will take? (A: (n bits + 7) / 8).

int RoundUp(int n, int roundTo)
{
    // fails on negative?  What does that mean?
    if (roundTo == 0) return 0;
    return ((n + roundTo - 1) / roundTo) * roundTo; // edit - fixed error
}
share|improve this answer
1  
This doesn't round up to the next multiple of a number. –  aaaa bbbb Aug 4 '10 at 16:07
1  
Fixed that - thanks. –  plinth Aug 4 '10 at 16:25
5  
I like this solution because if roundTo will be a power of 2, you can eliminate the / and * and end up with nothing but cheap operations (x = roundTo - 1; return (n+x)&~x;) –  Trejkaz Feb 6 '13 at 3:55
int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)
{
 if(multiple == 0)
 {
  return 0;
 }
 return ((numToRound - 1) / multiple + 1) * multiple;  
}

And no need to mess around with conditions

share|improve this answer

First off, your error condition (multiple == 0) should probably have a return value. What? I don't know. Maybe you want to throw an exception, that's up to you. But, returning nothing is dangerous.

Second, you should check that numToRound isn't already a multiple. Otherwise, when you add multiple to roundDown, you'll get the wrong answer.

Thirdly, your casts are wrong. You cast numToRound to an integer, but it's already an integer. You need to cast to to double before the division, and back to int after the multiplication.

Lastly, what do you want for negative numbers? Rounding "up" can mean rounding to zero (rounding in the same direction as positive numbers), or away from zero (a "larger" negative number). Or, maybe you don't care.

Here's a version with the first three fixes, but I don't deal with the negative issue:

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)
{
 if(multiple == 0)
 {
  return 0;
 }
 else if(numToRound % multiple == 0)
 {
  return numToRound
 }

 int roundDown = (int) (( (double) numToRound / multiple ) * multiple);
 int roundUp = roundDown + multiple; 
 int roundCalc = roundUp;
 return (roundCalc);
}
share|improve this answer
1  
-1: Conversion to double is bizarre and unnecessary. –  Peter Ruderman Aug 4 '10 at 16:06
    
+1 For numToRound % multiple == 0. Good catch –  David Relihan Aug 4 '10 at 16:07
    
@Peter Is it? I assumed that int / int would return an int, which is not what we wanted. –  Mike Caron Aug 4 '10 at 17:33
    
int / int does indeed return an int, but that's precisely what you want. For example, numToRound = 7, multiple = 3. 7 / 3 = 2. –  Peter Ruderman Aug 4 '10 at 18:16
  float roundUp( float number, float fixedBase ) {
     if (fixedBase != 0 && number != 0) {
        float sign = number>0?1:-1;
        number*=sign;
        number/=fixedBase;
        int fixedPoint = (int)ceil(number);
        number = fixedPoint*fixedBase;
        number*=sign;
     }
     return number;
  }

This works for any float number or base (e.g. you can round -4 to the nearest 6.75). In essence it is converting to fixed point, rounding there, then converting back. It handles negatives by rounding AWAY from 0. It also handles a negative round to value by essentially turning the function into roundDown.

An int specific version looks like:

  int roundUp( int number, int fixedBase ) {
     if (fixedBase != 0 && number != 0) {
        int sign = number>0?1:-1;
        int baseSign=fixedBase>0?1:0;
        number*=sign;
        int fixedPoint = (number+baseSign*(fixedBase-1))/fixedBase;
        number = fixedPoint*fixedBase;
        number*=sign;
     }
     return number;
  }

Which is more or less plinth's answer, with the added negative input support.

share|improve this answer
    
I have tested float roundUp code with double, it works for me. Really solves my issue. –  Ashif Aug 25 at 11:15

This is the modern c++ approach using a template function which is working for float, double, long, int and short (but not for long long, and long double because of the used double values).

#include <cmath>
#include <iostream>

template<typename T>
T roundMultiple( T value, T multiple )
{
    if (multiple == 0) return value;
    return static_cast<T>(std::round(static_cast<double>(value)/static_cast<double>(multiple))*static_cast<double>(multiple));
}

int main()
{
    std::cout << roundMultiple(39298.0, 100.0) << std::endl;
    std::cout << roundMultiple(20930.0f, 1000.0f) << std::endl;
    std::cout << roundMultiple(287399, 10) << std::endl;
}

But you can easily add support for long long and long double with template specialisation as shown below:

template<>
long double roundMultiple<long double>( long double value, long double multiple)
{
    if (multiple == 0.0l) return value;
    return std::round(value/multiple)*multiple;
}

template<>
long long roundMultiple<long long>( long long value, long long multiple)
{
    if (multiple == 0.0l) return value;
    return static_cast<long long>(std::round(static_cast<long double>(value)/static_cast<long double>(multiple))*static_cast<long double>(multiple));
}

To create functions to round up, use std::ceil and to always round down use std::floor. My example from above is rounding using std::round.

Create the "round up" or better known as "round ceiling" template function as shown below:

template<typename T>
T roundCeilMultiple( T value, T multiple )
{
    if (multiple == 0) return value;
    return static_cast<T>(std::ceil(static_cast<double>(value)/static_cast<double>(multiple))*static_cast<double>(multiple));
}

Create the "round down" or better known as "round floor" template function as shown below:

template<typename T>
T roundFloorMultiple( T value, T multiple )
{
    if (multiple == 0) return value;
    return static_cast<T>(std::floor(static_cast<double>(value)/static_cast<double>(multiple))*static_cast<double>(multiple));
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for posting something untyped. –  Manuel Arwed Schmidt Apr 14 at 19:11

Probably safer to cast to floats and use ceil() - unless you know that the int division is going to produce the correct result.

share|improve this answer
int noOfMultiples = int((numToRound / multiple)+0.5);
return noOfMultiples*multiple

C++ rounds each number down,so if you add 0.5 (if its 1.5 it will be 2) but 1.49 will be 1.99 therefore 1.

EDIT - Sorry didn't see you wanted to round up, i would suggest using a ceil() method instead of the +0.5

share|improve this answer

well for one thing, since i dont really understand what you want to do, the lines

int roundUp = roundDown + multiple;
int roundCalc = roundUp;
return (roundCalc); 

could definitely be shortened to

int roundUp = roundDown + multiple;
return roundUp;
share|improve this answer

I found an algorithm which is somewhat similar to one posted above:

int[(|x|+n-1)/n]*[(nx)/|x|], where x is a user-input value and n is the multiple being used.

It works for all values x, where x is an integer (positive or negative, including zero). I wrote it specifically for a C++ program, but this can basically be implemented in any language.

share|improve this answer

may be this can help:

int RoundUpToNearestMultOfNumber(int val, int num)
{
  assert(0 != num);
  return (floor((val + num) / num) * num);
}
share|improve this answer

This is what I would do:

#include <cmath>

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)
{
    // if our number is zero, return immediately
   if (numToRound == 0)
        return multiple;

    // if multiplier is zero, return immediately
    if (multiple == 0)
        return numToRound;

    // how many times are number greater than multiple
    float rounds = static_cast<float>(numToRound) / static_cast<float>(multiple);

    // determine, whether if number is multiplier of multiple
    int floorRounds = static_cast<int>(floor(rounds));

    if (rounds - floorRounds > 0)
        // multiple is not multiplier of number -> advance to the next multiplier
        return (floorRounds+1) * multiple;
    else
        // multiple is multiplier of number -> return actual multiplier
        return (floorRounds) * multiple;
}

The code might not be optimal, but I prefer clean code than dry performance.

share|improve this answer

Round to Power of Two:

Just in case anyone needs a solution for positive numbers rounded to the nearest multiple of a power of two (because that's how I ended up here):

// number: the number to be rounded (ex: 5, 123, 98345, etc.)
// pow2:   the power to be rounded to (ex: to round to 16, use '4')
int roundPow2 (int number, int pow2) {
    pow2--;                     // because (2 exp x) == (1 << (x -1))
    pow2 = 0x01 << pow2;

    pow2--;                     // because for any
                                //
                                // (x = 2 exp x)
                                //
                                // subtracting one will
                                // yield a field of ones
                                // which we can use in a
                                // bitwise OR

    number--;                   // yield a similar field for
                                // bitwise OR
    number = number | pow2;
    number++;                   // restore value by adding one back

    return number;
}

The input number will stay the same if it is already a multiple.

Here is the x86_64 output that GCC gives with -O2 or -Os (9Sep2013 Build - godbolt GCC online):

roundPow2(int, int):
    lea ecx, [rsi-1]
    mov eax, 1
    sub edi, 1
    sal eax, cl
    sub eax, 1
    or  eax, edi
    add eax, 1
    ret

Each C line of code corresponds perfectly with its line in the assembly: http://goo.gl/DZigfX

Each of those instructions are extremely fast, so the function is extremely fast too. Since the code is so small and quick, it might be useful to inline the function when using it.


Credit:

share|improve this answer
1  
Exactly what I was looking for. Thanks! –  kiyo Jun 26 at 17:32

For negative numToRound:

It should be really easy to do this but the standard modulo % operator doesn't handle negative numbers like one might expect. For instance -14 % 12 = -2 and not 10. First thing to do is to get modulo operator that never returns negative numbers. Then roundUp is really simple.

public static int mod(int x, int n) 
{
    return ((x % n) + n) % n;
}

public static int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) 
{
    return numRound + mod(-numToRound, multiple);
}
share|improve this answer

For anyone looking for a short and sweet answer. This is what I used. No accounting for negatives.

n - (n % r)

That will return the previous factor.

(n + r) - (n % r)

Will return the next. Hope this helps someone. :)

share|improve this answer

To always round up

int alwaysRoundUp(int n, int multiple)
{
    if (n % multiple != 0) {
        n = ((n + multiple) / multiple) * multiple;

        // Another way
        //n = n - n % multiple + multiple;
    }

    return n;
}

alwaysRoundUp(1, 10) -> 10

alwaysRoundUp(5, 10) -> 10

alwaysRoundUp(10, 10) -> 10


To always round down

int alwaysRoundDown(int n, int multiple)
{
    n = (n / multiple) * multiple;

    return n;
}

alwaysRoundDown(1, 10) -> 0

alwaysRoundDown(5, 10) -> 0

alwaysRoundDown(10, 10) -> 10


To round the normal way

int normalRound(int n, int multiple)
{
    n = ((n + multiple/2)/multiple) * multiple;

    return n;
}

normalRound(1, 10) -> 0

normalRound(5, 10) -> 10

normalRound(10, 10) -> 10

share|improve this answer
/// Rounding up 'n' to the nearest multiple of number 'b'.
/// - Not tested for negative numbers.
/// \see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/3407012/
#define roundUp(n,b) ( (b)==0 ? (n) : ( ((n)+(b)-1) - (((n)-1)%(b)) ) )

/// \c test->roundUp().
void test_roundUp() {   
    // yes_roundUp(n,b) ( (b)==0 ? (n) : ( (n)%(b)==0 ? n : (n)+(b)-(n)%(b) ) )
    // yes_roundUp(n,b) ( (b)==0 ? (n) : ( ((n + b - 1) / b) * b ) )

    // no_roundUp(n,b) ( (n)%(b)==0 ? n : (b)*( (n)/(b) )+(b) )
    // no_roundUp(n,b) ( (n)+(b) - (n)%(b) )

if (true) // couldn't make it work without (?:)
{{  // test::roundUp()
    unsigned m;
                { m = roundUp(17,8); } ++m;
    assertTrue( 24 == roundUp(17,8) );
                { m = roundUp(24,8); }
    assertTrue( 24 == roundUp(24,8) );

    assertTrue( 24 == roundUp(24,4) );
    assertTrue( 24 == roundUp(23,4) );
                { m = roundUp(23,4); }
    assertTrue( 24 == roundUp(21,4) );

    assertTrue( 20 == roundUp(20,4) );
    assertTrue( 20 == roundUp(19,4) );
    assertTrue( 20 == roundUp(18,4) );
    assertTrue( 20 == roundUp(17,4) );

    assertTrue( 17 == roundUp(17,0) );
    assertTrue( 20 == roundUp(20,0) );
}}
}
share|improve this answer

This is getting the results you are seeking for positive integers:

#include <iostream>
using namespace std;

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple);

int main() {
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(7, 100) << endl;
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(117, 100) << endl;
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(477, 100) << endl;
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(1077, 100) << endl;
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(52,20) << endl;
    cout << "answer is: " << roundUp(74,30) << endl;
    return 0;
}

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) {
    if (multiple == 0) {
        return 0;
    }
    int result = (int) (numToRound / multiple) * multiple;
    if (numToRound % multiple) {
        result += multiple;
    } 
    return result;
}

And here are the outputs:

answer is: 100
answer is: 200
answer is: 500
answer is: 1100
answer is: 60
answer is: 90
share|improve this answer
int roundUp (int numToRound, int multiple)
{
  return multiple * ((numToRound + multiple - 1) / multiple);
}

although:

  • won't work for negative numbers
  • won't work if numRound + multiple overflows

would suggest using unsigned integers instead, which has defined overflow behaviour.

You'll get an exception is multiple == 0, but it isn't a well-defined problem in that case anyway.

share|improve this answer

c:

int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple)
{
  return (multiple ? (((numToRound+multiple-1) / multiple) * multiple) : numToRound);
}

and for your ~/.bashrc:

roundup()
{
  echo $(( ${2} ? ((${1}+${2}-1)/${2})*${2} : ${1} ))
}
share|improve this answer

I'm using:

template <class _Ty>
inline _Ty n_Align_Up(_Ty n_x, _Ty n_alignment)
{
    n_x += n_alignment - 1;
    return n_x - n_x % n_alignment;
}

and for powers of two:

template <class _Ty>
inline _Ty n_Align_Up_POT(_Ty n_x, _Ty n_pot_alignment)
{
    _ASSERTE(b_Is_POT(n_pot_alignment)); // alignment must be power of two
    -- n_pot_alignment;
    return (n_x + n_pot_alignment) & ~n_pot_alignment;
}
share|improve this answer

This works for me but did not try to handle negatives

public static int roundUp(int numToRound, int multiple) {
    if (multiple == 0) {
        return 0;
    } else if (numToRound % multiple == 0) {
    return numToRound;
    }

    int mod = numToRound % multiple;
    int diff = multiple - mod;
    return numToRound + diff;
}
share|improve this answer

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