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I am thinking about something that would allow to develop applications independent of the GUI library, but allow Qt and GTK being plugged in as needed.

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So, if QT and GTK are "meta" frameworks that allow cross platform development, you want a meta-meta framework - one that allows cross (cross platform) development? wtf? –  Chris Becke Aug 4 '10 at 15:25
    
Well. there are quite a lot of application for which it does not make sense to have two versions for ubuntu and kubuntu. I know you can run apps from one on the other, but the penalty is then, that both libraries need to be used simultaneously. –  txwikinger Aug 4 '10 at 15:37
    
java/swt? :) I doubt that the "penalty" using both libs outweights the pain and overengineering when writing the app. a) You'd need to release and maintain two "editions" of the app b) it won't feel fully "native" on any of the desktops (UI concepts, menu structures etc etc). So I don't see any real advantage using something like that over just using a Qt app in gnome or a Gtk one in KDE. –  Frank Osterfeld Aug 4 '10 at 21:42

5 Answers 5

up vote 7 down vote accepted

I'd just use Qt. It includes a Gtk-like style, mimics Gtk standard dialogs and even uses Gtk file dialogs if run under Gnome, so basically it integrates itself into Gtk as good as anything (except Gtk of course), or at least it integrates itself better into Gtk than Gtk does into Qt.

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You can try to use wxWidgets but you tend to get "lowest common denominator" if you go that route. Your better bet is to design your software such that you can plug in an implementation of the necessary "views" in the desired toolkit, and keep your core UI toolkit independant.

Obviously this is more work, but if there is a strong business need, then so be it.

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wxWidgets doesn't use Qt, it only uses Gtk. –  lunaryorn Aug 4 '10 at 15:49

I don't know of any framework doing something like that (I don't know how it could possibly be done without suffering from a heavy "lowest-common-denominator" syndrome), but I do "cross toolkit" development (applications that use more than one GUI toolkit) and I wrote an article about why and how to do it:

http://www.hardcoded.net/articles/cross-toolkit-software.htm

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Sometimes "lowest common denominator" isn't so bad. It really depends on the task at hand, but many, many GUIs don't need much more than notebooks, trees, menubars, toolbars and buttons. –  Bryan Oakley Aug 4 '10 at 15:53
    
If lowest-common-denominator isn't a problem, then any framework can be used, no need for a meta-framework. I think nearly all GUI framework can emulate the look of all others. –  Virgil Dupras Aug 4 '10 at 15:57

You can try Tk, which supports themes. There is a tile-qt and tile-gtk theme. There is a 2010 Google Summer of Code project to improve these themes. And, of course, when you use Tk you also get support for Windows and OSX out of the box.

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Qt is a framework, it uses GTK underneath (at least on Unix).

There was a mobile toolkit that let you write everything in JS but compiled to the native code on each platform. I forget the name but it was a victim of the iPhone lockdown.

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No, Qt doesn't use GTK underneath, at most it integrates with the GLib main loop. –  Matias Valdenegro Aug 4 '10 at 15:30
    
You're thinking of Titanium, and no, it doesn't violate the iPhone SDK terms. –  derekerdmann Aug 4 '10 at 15:53
    
@derekerdmann Titanium was what I was thinking of. I thought it had fallen under the 'no code generators' rule –  Martin Beckett Aug 4 '10 at 17:56
    
I don't know too much about the specifics, but I believe that since it compiles to native code that is then compiled by the native tools, it was ok. Check out their website to be sure. –  derekerdmann Aug 4 '10 at 18:14

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