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I've written a remote Python debugger and one of the features I need is to execute arbitrary code while stopped at a breakpoint. My debugger uses the following to execute code received from the remote debugger:

exec (compile(code, '<string>', 'single') , frame.f_globals, frame.f_locals)

This works fine for the most part, but I've noticed a couple issues.

  1. Assignment statements aren't actually applied to the original locals dictionary. This is probably due to the fact that f_locals is supposed to be read-only.

  2. If stopped within a class method, accessing protected attributes (names beginning with double underscore) does not work. I'm assuming this is due to the name mangling that Python performs on protected attributes.

So my question is, is there a way around these limitations? Can I trick Python into thinking that the code is being executed in the actual local scope of that frame?

I'm using CPython 2.7, and I'm willing to accept a solution/hack specific to this version.

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up vote 2 down vote accepted

Assignment statements aren't actually applied to the original locals dictionary. This is probably due to the fact that f_locals is supposed to be read-only.

Not exactly, but the bytecode for the function will not look at locals, using rather a simple but crucial optimization whereby local variables are in a simple array, avoiding runtime lookups. The only way to avoid this (and make the function much, much slower) is compiling different code, e.g. code starting with an exec '' to force the compiler to avoid the optimization (in Python 2; no way, in Python 3). If you need to work with existing bytecode, you're out of luck: there is no way to accomplish what you desire.

If stopped within a class method, accessing protected attributes (names beginning with double underscore) does not work. I'm assuming this is due to the name mangling that Python performs on protected attributes.

Yep, so this issue does allow a workaround: prepend _Classname to the name to mimic what the compiler does. Note that double-underscore prefixes means private: protected would be a single underscore (and would give you no trouble). Private names are specifically meant to avoid accidental classes with names bound in subclasses (and work decently for that one purpose, though not perfectly, and not for anything else;-).

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Not the answer I was hoping for, but thanks for the clarification Alex. – flashk Aug 4 '10 at 18:35

I'm not sure I've understood you correctly, but exec does populate the locals parameter with assignments inside the code:

>>> loc = {}
>>> exec(compile('a=3', '<string>', 'single'), {}, loc)
>>> loc
{'a': 3}

Perhaps f_locals doesn't allow writes.

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In my experience, f_locals is writable, but it seems to be a copy of the original locals() dictionary. So any changes made to it, won't affect the original scope. – flashk Aug 4 '10 at 16:56

to execute arbitrary code while stopped at a breakpoint ... Can I trick Python into thinking that the code is being executed in the actual local scope of that frame?

The Python debugger, pdb, allows this. For example, let's say you are debugging the file tests/scopeTest.py, and you have the following line in your program, where the variable hasn't been declared in the program itself :

print (NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM)

so that running the code python tests/scopeTest.py would result in :

NameError: name 'NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM' is not defined

Now you would like to define that variable when stopped at that line in the debugger, and have the program continue executing, using that variable as if it had been defined in the program all along. In other words, you would like to effect the change within that scope, so that you can continue execution with that change permanent. It is actually possible :

$ python -m pdb tests/scopeTest.py
> /home/user/tests/scopeTest.py(1)<module>()
-> print (NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM)
(Pdb) 'NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM' in locals()
False
(Pdb) NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM = 5
(Pdb) 'NOT_DEFINED_IN_PROGRAM' in locals()
True
(Pdb) step
5

Pdb does this through a compile and exec in its default function, which does the equivalent of :

code = compile(line + '\n', <stdin>, 'single')
exec(code, self.curframe.f_globals, self.curframe_locals)

where self.curframe is a specific frame. Now, self.curframe_locals is not self.curframe.f_locals, because, as the setup function says :

# The f_locals dictionary is updated from the actual frame
# locals whenever the .f_locals accessor is called, so we
# cache it here to ensure that modifications are not overwritten.
self.curframe_locals = self.curframe.f_locals

Hope that helps, and is what you meant!

Take note that, even then, should you want to, for example, replace a function in the context of the program being debugged with a monkey-patched version, such as:

newGlobals['abs'] = myCustomAbsFunction
exec(code, newGlobals, locals)

the scope of the myCustomAbsFunction is not going to be the user program, but is going to be the context of where that function was defined, which is the debugger! There is a way around that too, but as it wasn't specifically asked, it is left as an exercise for the reader, for now. ^__^

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