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I had always used something similar to the following to achieve it:

INSERT INTO TheTable
SELECT
    @primaryKey,
    @value1,
    @value2
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS
    (SELECT
        NULL
    FROM
        TheTable
    WHERE
        PrimaryKey = @primaryKey)

...but once under load, a primary key violation occurred. This is the only statement which inserts into this table at all. So does this mean that the above statement is not atomic?

The problem is that this is almost impossible to recreate at will.

Perhaps I could change it to the something like the following:

INSERT INTO TheTable
WITH
    (HOLDLOCK,
    UPDLOCK,
    ROWLOCK)
SELECT
    @primaryKey,
    @value1,
    @value2
WHERE
    NOT EXISTS
    (SELECT
        NULL
    FROM
        TheTable
    WITH
        (HOLDLOCK,
        UPDLOCK,
        ROWLOCK)
    WHERE
        PrimaryKey = @primaryKey)

Although, maybe I'm using the wrong locks or using too much locking or something.

I have seen other questions on stackoverflow.com where answers are suggesting a "IF (SELECT COUNT(*) ... INSERT" etc., but I was always under the (perhaps incorrect) assumption that a single SQL statement would be atomic.

Does anyone have any ideas?

Thanks.

Adam

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2  
Have you tried using a merge without a WHEN MATCHED clause? –  a'r Aug 4 '10 at 16:59
2  
What version of SQL Server are you on? –  Martin Smith Aug 4 '10 at 16:59
    
It varies depending on the client. Anything between and including 2000 and 2008 R2. Although we may have been on 7 when the statement was originally written! –  Adam Aug 4 '10 at 17:20
    
I must have a look at this new (to me) MERGE statement. Does it perform any better in this case? –  Adam Aug 4 '10 at 17:23
1  
I do not see the point ! Just insert your data, and if the PK already exists, the insert will fail, and that will be fine. Or am I missing something ? –  iDevlop Aug 4 '10 at 20:45
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6 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

What about the "JFDI" pattern?

BEGIN TRY
   INSERT etc
END TRY
BEGIN CATCH
    IF ERROR_NUMBER() <> 2627
      RAISERROR etc
END CATCH

Seriously, this is quickest and the most concurrent without locks, especially at high volumes. What if the UPDLOCK is escalated and the whole table is locked?

Read lesson 4

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Thanks - okay, I agree that this is probably what I will end up using, and is the answer to the actual question. –  Adam Aug 4 '10 at 19:58
1  
I know it's bad to rely on errors like this, but I wonder if doing this with just a straight INSERT (without the EXISTS) would perform better (i.e. try insert no matter what and just ignore error 2627). –  Adam Aug 4 '10 at 20:02
    
That depends on whether you mostly insert values that don't exist or mostly values that do exist. In the latter case, I'd argue the performance will be poorer due to tons of exceptions being raised and ignored. –  GSerg Aug 4 '10 at 21:11
    
@Gserg: correct. But then OP would have posted an INSERT/UPDATE question, not test for inert arguably. We use this to filter out a few thousand duplicates in dozen million new rows per day –  gbn Aug 5 '10 at 4:19
1  
"Lesson 4" was an interesting read –  Peter G. Dec 19 '12 at 8:12
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I added HOLDLOCK which wasn't present originally. Please disregard the version without this hint.

As far as I'm concerned, this should be enough:

INSERT INTO TheTable 
SELECT 
    @primaryKey, 
    @value1, 
    @value2 
WHERE 
    NOT EXISTS 
    (SELECT 0
     FROM TheTable WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK)
     WHERE PrimaryKey = @primaryKey) 

Also, if you actually want to update a row if it exists and insert if it doesn't, you might find this question useful.

share|improve this answer
    
What are you locking when the row doesn't exist? –  Martin Smith Aug 4 '10 at 17:04
2  
A relevant range in the index (the primary key in this case). –  GSerg Aug 4 '10 at 17:05
    
@GSerg Agreed. The pessimistic/optimistic locking of the select statement needs a directive. –  DaveWilliamson Aug 4 '10 at 17:06
2  
The testing shows that two select 'Done.' where exists(select 0 from foo_testing with(updlock) where id = 4);, provided id=4 does not exist, don't conflict with each other, which means my original answer was actually wrong. The solution is to add the HOLDLOCK hint. See the edited answer. Thanks for keeping me bugged :) –  GSerg Aug 5 '10 at 12:01
1  
There's a great explanation of why this locking is required in Daniel's answer to my (very similar) question: stackoverflow.com/questions/3789287/… –  Iain Sep 25 '10 at 8:35
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You could use MERGE:

MERGE INTO Target
USING (VALUES (@primaryKey, @value1, @value2)) Source (key, value1, value2)
ON Target.key = Source.key
WHEN MATCHED THEN
    UPDATE SET value1 = Source.value1, value2 = Source.value2
WHEN NOT MATCHED BY TARGET THEN
    INSERT (Name, ReasonType) VALUES (@primaryKey, @value1, @value2)
share|improve this answer
    
In this case you can remove the 'WHEN MATCHED THEN' as Adam only needs to insert if missing, not upsert. –  Iain Apr 21 '11 at 16:22
    
Sorry, but without adding hold lock hints to your merge statement, you will have the exact problem that the OP is concerned about. –  EBarr Jun 11 '11 at 21:53
3  
See this article for more on @EBarr's point –  Martin Smith Dec 29 '11 at 16:03
1  
@MartinSmith - that is the exact article I read when I ran across the issue! Thanks for the reference. –  EBarr Dec 30 '11 at 2:04
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I don't know if this is the "official" way, but you could try the INSERT, and fall back to UPDATE if it fails.

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Can you wrap the statement in a transaction? That should block any other statements from trying to insert until the first transaction is committed.

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It doesn't. At default read committed isolation level. –  Martin Smith Nov 23 '13 at 0:26
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I've done a similar operation in past using a different method. First, I declare a variable to hold the primary key. Then I populate that variable with the output of a select statement which looks for a record with those values. Then I do and IF statement. If primary key is null, then do insert, else, return some error code.

     DECLARE @existing varchar(10)
    SET @existing = (SELECT primaryKey FROM TABLE WHERE param1field = @param1 AND param2field = @param2)

    IF @existing is not null
    BEGIN
    INSERT INTO Table(param1Field, param2Field) VALUES(param1, param2)
    END
    ELSE
    Return 0
END
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Why not just do: IF NOT EXISTS (SELECT * FROM TABLE WHERE param1field = @param1 AND param2field = @param2) BEGIN INSERT INTO Table(param1Field, param2Field) VALUES(param1, param2) END –  Vidar Nordnes Aug 4 '10 at 17:29
    
Yeah, but that looks like it's open to concurrency issues (i.e. what if something happens on another connection between your select and your insert?) –  Adam Aug 4 '10 at 17:31
2  
@Adam Marc's code above isn't any better for avoiding locking issues. The only two ways to handle concurrency issues are to lock using WITH (UPDLOCK, HOLDLOCK) or to handle the insert error and convert it to an update. –  ErikE Oct 2 '10 at 1:06
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