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I'm developing an application where a user clicks/presses enter on a certain button in a window, the application does some checks and determines whether to send out a couple of emails or not, then show another window with a message.

My issue is, sending out the 2 emails slows the process noticeably, and for some (~8) seconds the first window looks frozen while it's doing the sending.

Is there any way I can have these emails sent on the background and display the next window right away?

Please don't limit your answer with "use X class" or "just use X method" as I am not all too familiarized with the language yet and some more information would be highly appreciated.

Thanks.

share|improve this question
    
Does your application ever need to do anything with the result (success, failure, other) of sending the email? This can impact whether you ever need to wait for or look for the result of sending the mail (and thus how you do so), or if it's more of a "fire-and-forget" kind of thing. –  JaredReisinger Aug 4 '10 at 18:16
    
Not really, it's more of a fire-and-forget thing as you call it. It's something pretty simple I think but obviously not so much for me. I'm looking at the different answers at the moment and testing results. –  Eton B. Aug 4 '10 at 18:24
    
If you look at my answer I have given you a small (but should be working - not tested though!) example with how to send out the emails not only asynchronously, but how to handle the results and display feedback to the UI. –  James Aug 4 '10 at 18:27
    
Times change and Boris Lipschitz's answer is absolutely the most preferred method in today's async/await world. I'd even urge the OP to switch the accepted answer to that one (or at least for others to +1 it out of the cellar). –  Todd Menier Jun 6 at 17:21

10 Answers 10

up vote 9 down vote accepted

As of .NET 4.5 SmtpClient implements async awaitable method SendMailAsync. As a result, to send email asynchronously is as following:

public async Task SendEmail(string toEmailAddress, string emailSubject, string emailMessage)
{
    var message = new MailMessage();
    message.To.Add(toEmailAddress);

    message.Subject = emailSubject;
    message.Body = emailMessage;

    using (var smtpClient = new SmtpClient())
    {
        await smtpClient.SendMailAsync(message);
    }
} 
share|improve this answer
    
This is the best answer by today's standards as it is the only one supporting async/await. –  Todd Menier Jun 6 at 17:16

As it's a small unit of work you should use ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem for the threading aspect of it. If you use the SmtpClient class to send your mail you could handle the SendCompleted event to give feedback to the user.

ThreadPool.QueueUserWorkItem(t =>
{
    SmtpClient client = new SmtpClient("MyMailServer");
    MailAddress from = new MailAddress("me@mydomain.com", "My Name", System.Text.Encoding.UTF8);
    MailAddress to = new MailAddress("someone@theirdomain.com");
    MailMessage message = new MailMessage(from, to);
    message.Body = "The message I want to send.";
    message.BodyEncoding =  System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
    message.Subject = "The subject of the email";
    message.SubjectEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
    // Set the method that is called back when the send operation ends.
    client.SendCompleted += new SendCompletedEventHandler(SendCompletedCallback);
    // The userState can be any object that allows your callback 
    // method to identify this send operation.
    // For this example, I am passing the message itself
    client.SendAsync(message, message);
});

private static void SendCompletedCallback(object sender, AsyncCompletedEventArgs e)
{
        // Get the message we sent
        MailMessage msg = (MailMessage)e.UserState;

        if (e.Cancelled)
        {
            // prompt user with "send cancelled" message 
        }
        if (e.Error != null)
        {
            // prompt user with error message 
        }
        else
        {
            // prompt user with message sent!
            // as we have the message object we can also display who the message
            // was sent to etc 
        }

        // finally dispose of the message
        if (msg != null)
            msg.Dispose();
}

By creating a fresh SMTP client each time this will allow you to send out emails simultaneously.

share|improve this answer
1  
So I'm trying to work on this answer, as it seems the most viable (simplicity/similar to what I'm using) for me. What exactly is used as "userState", though? Do I HAVE to use a thread? I simply changed my Send method for this: string someString = "Message"; smtp.SendAsync(message,someString); to no avail. I'll implement all your solution and see what I'm doing wrong. –  Eton B. Aug 4 '10 at 18:38
1  
@Eton if you look at the example I have indicated what the userState variable does. It is an object that is passed to the Callback method when the event is raised. In the example I am using it as a unique identifier but basically you can pass whatever you want into it. No it is not a necessity, if you don't need to use it in the callback method then simply pass in null. –  James Aug 4 '10 at 19:11
1  
@Eton - No you don't have to use a thread at all. If you take the email sending code out of the QueueUserWorkItem call and put it directly behind the click event of the button it should work all the same as you are creating a separate SmtpClient each time and the email is being sent using SendAsync (which won't block the UI). –  James Aug 4 '10 at 19:13
1  
This will not work since the message is disposed before it is sent. Either use Send or dispose the message in the callback. (note that the msdn example only disposes the message if send is cancelled. Can't find anything in the documentation supporting it) –  adrianm Aug 4 '10 at 19:16
2  
@Sruly - It is best practise to always dispose objects that implement IDisposable (usually you would want to wrap it in a using statement, but in this case we can't). Also if your mail message had attachments then you would not be able to touch them, even on disk, until the message was destroyed as it locks them down. As for using SendAsync inside the thread. The benefit of using this is you get the callback and from there you can determine the result of the send. If we wanted to use the Send method instead we would need to wrap this in a try...catch block incase it failed. –  James Aug 4 '10 at 20:07

It's not too complicated to simply send the message on a separate thread:

using System.Net.Mail;

Smtp.SendAsync(message);

Or, if you want to construct the whole message on the separate thread instead of rather just send it Asynchronously:

using System.Threading;
using System.Net.Mail;

var sendMailThread = new Thread(() => {
    var message=new MailMessage();
    message.From="from e-mail";
    message.To="to e-mail";
    message.Subject="Message Subject";
    message.Body="Message Body";

    SmtpMail.SmtpServer="SMTP Server Address";
    SmtpMail.Send(message);
});

sendMailThread.Start();
share|improve this answer
4  
[ObsoleteAttribute("The recommended alternative is System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient. go.microsoft.com/fwlink/?linkid=14202")] –  Andrey Aug 4 '10 at 18:09
4  
also thread creation is recommended for long running processes, not for async tasks –  Andrey Aug 4 '10 at 18:10

SmtpClient.SendAsync Method

Sample

using System;
using System.Net;
using System.Net.Mail;
using System.Net.Mime;
using System.Threading;
using System.ComponentModel;
namespace Examples.SmptExamples.Async
{
    public class SimpleAsynchronousExample
    {
        static bool mailSent = false;
        private static void SendCompletedCallback(object sender, AsyncCompletedEventArgs e)
        {
            // Get the unique identifier for this asynchronous operation.
             String token = (string) e.UserState;

            if (e.Cancelled)
            {
                 Console.WriteLine("[{0}] Send canceled.", token);
            }
            if (e.Error != null)
            {
                 Console.WriteLine("[{0}] {1}", token, e.Error.ToString());
            } else
            {
                Console.WriteLine("Message sent.");
            }
            mailSent = true;
        }
        public static void Main(string[] args)
        {
            // Command line argument must the the SMTP host.
            SmtpClient client = new SmtpClient(args[0]);
            // Specify the e-mail sender. 
            // Create a mailing address that includes a UTF8 character 
            // in the display name.
            MailAddress from = new MailAddress("jane@contoso.com", 
               "Jane " + (char)0xD8+ " Clayton", 
            System.Text.Encoding.UTF8);
            // Set destinations for the e-mail message.
            MailAddress to = new MailAddress("ben@contoso.com");
            // Specify the message content.
            MailMessage message = new MailMessage(from, to);
            message.Body = "This is a test e-mail message sent by an application. ";
            // Include some non-ASCII characters in body and subject. 
            string someArrows = new string(new char[] {'\u2190', '\u2191', '\u2192', '\u2193'});
            message.Body += Environment.NewLine + someArrows;
            message.BodyEncoding =  System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
            message.Subject = "test message 1" + someArrows;
            message.SubjectEncoding = System.Text.Encoding.UTF8;
            // Set the method that is called back when the send operation ends.
            client.SendCompleted += new 
            SendCompletedEventHandler(SendCompletedCallback);
            // The userState can be any object that allows your callback  
            // method to identify this send operation. 
            // For this example, the userToken is a string constant. 
            string userState = "test message1";
            client.SendAsync(message, userState);
            Console.WriteLine("Sending message... press c to cancel mail. Press any other key to exit.");
            string answer = Console.ReadLine();
            // If the user canceled the send, and mail hasn't been sent yet, 
            // then cancel the pending operation. 
            if (answer.StartsWith("c") && mailSent == false)
            {
                client.SendAsyncCancel();
            }
            // Clean up.
            message.Dispose();
            Console.WriteLine("Goodbye.");
        }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
2  
-1 OP specifically asked if you would not just specify what methods they needed to use, they wanted an example. –  James Aug 4 '10 at 18:24
4  
@James go to link, there is example there. " Examples [+] The following code example demonstrates calling this method." –  Andrey Aug 4 '10 at 18:27

Just because this is a little vague...I will be brief...

There are a lot of ways to do asynchronous or parallel work in c#/.net etc.

The fastest way to do what you want is to use a background worker thread which will avoid locking up your UI.

A tip with background worker threads : you cannot directly update the UI from them (thread affinity and Marshalling is just something you learn to deal with...)

Another thing to consider...if you use the standard System.Net.Mail type stuff to send the emails...be careful how you craft your logic. If you isolate it all in some method and call it over and over, it will likely have to tear down and rebuild the connection to the mail server each time and the latency involved in authentication etc will still slow the whole thing down unnecessarily. Send multiple e-mails through a single open connection to the mail server when possible.

share|improve this answer

Try this:

var client = new System.Net.Mail.SmtpClient("smtp.server");
var message = new System.Net.Mail.MailMessage() { /* provide its properties */ };
client.SendAsync(message, null);
share|improve this answer
2  
I tried this solution, however SendAsync takes at least 2 parameters. I used a correct overload but the emails are not being sent, I've tried debugging and in the SendAsync line the recipient address, subject, body, etc. are correct. I've no idea why it's not sending them when Send does. –  Eton B. Aug 4 '10 at 18:56
1  
$eton-b: Sorry about the syntax error. I fixed it. –  kbrimington Aug 4 '10 at 20:15

Use the SmtpClient class and use the method SendAsync in the System.Net.Mail namespace.

share|improve this answer

What you want to do is run the e-mail task on a separate thread so the main code can continue processing while the other thread does the e-mail work.

Here is a tutorial on how to do that: Threading Tutorial C#

share|improve this answer

The easiest Solution is to create a BackgroundWorker and push the mails into a queue. Then just let the BackgroundWorker go through the queue and send each mail.

See also How to: Run an Operation in the Background

share|improve this answer
1  
any full source code sample about it? –  Kiquenet Sep 13 '13 at 8:03

Using the Task Parallel Library in .NET 4.0, you can do:

Parllel.Invoke(() => { YourSendMailMethod(); });

Also, see cristina manu's blog post about Parallel.Invoke() vs. explicit task management.

share|improve this answer
1  
That's not going to work. The Invoke function doesn't return until all actions inside are complete. –  Gabe Aug 4 '10 at 20:25
1  
Crud... you're right, of course. I was thinking of Task.Factory.StartNew(). –  JaredReisinger Aug 4 '10 at 22:12

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