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How to check if $_GET is empty?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 56 down vote accepted

You said it yourself, check that it's empty:

if (empty($_GET)) {
    // no data passed by get
}

See, PHP is so straightforward. You may simply write, what you think ;)

This method is quite secure. !$_GET could give you an undefined variable E_NOTICE if $_GET was unset (not probable, but possible).

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1  
@Frank It is true... when everything is going well. But isn't a notice is what do you expect if $_GET happen to be not set? Isn't it the only purpose of such a notice? –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 18:55
3  
No, you never want to have your code throw you a notice. Source code throwing errors of any type is always considered bad. –  NikiC Aug 4 '10 at 18:57
2  
well what's the purpose of all these errors then? any suggestions? –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 19:01
2  
To tell you, that you made a mistake whilst coding. If I get a parse error, I can correct the mistake. If I get a undefined var / index notice, I can correct it. That's the purpose. But production code oughtn't throw errors. (And if it does they ought be suppressed and logged.) –  NikiC Aug 4 '10 at 19:03
1  
Yes, getting a notice is always bad, because it tells you that you did something wrong. –  NikiC Aug 4 '10 at 19:14

i guess the simplest way which doesn't require any operators is

if($_GET){
//do something if $_GET is set 
} 
if(!$_GET){
//do something if $_GET is NOT set 
} 
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-1 given that it could throw a notice error. Using empty to test is a better alternative. –  Brad F Jacobs Aug 4 '10 at 19:34
3  
+1 given for there is no need to use empty(). @premiso got any real-life example to prove why it's better? –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 20:03
    
Col, no I actually do not. But I could ask the same of you why yours is "better" and if you can provide me with real-life examples of why your solution is better, the real answer is both are valid (after my vague tests). So yea, I was in the wrong for the downvote and if the user modifies this I will switch it. What it comes down to is preference, I prefer to use the empty. The only reason I can give on this is that empty checks if an item is empty. Given that $_GET not being set returns array(0) from a var_dump, empty seems to be a better choice to use, in my opinion. –  Brad F Jacobs Aug 4 '10 at 20:16

Just to provide some variation here: You could check for

if ($_SERVER["QUERY_STRING"] == null)

it is completely identical to testing $_GET.

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+1 I thought of the same thing but wasn't sure against what you need to check. Against !isset, null or ''. Does null work here, have you tested? –  NikiC Aug 4 '10 at 19:00
    
@nikic yup, tested and works. Because it comes from Apache, it will always be set - even if it's empty - so no array_key_exists() check is necessary. –  Pekka 웃 Aug 4 '10 at 19:02
    
anything will work, niki –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 19:03
<?php
if (!isset($_GET) || empty($_GET))
{
    // do stuff here
}
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6  
!isset($_GET) is not necessary here, if (empty($_GET)) would be enough –  Alexander Konstantinov Aug 4 '10 at 18:35
    
Oops, my bad... –  john010117 Aug 4 '10 at 18:38
2  
Just FYI: $_GET can be unset, it is however very rare to configure PHP that way (see variables_order) –  Wrikken Aug 4 '10 at 18:42
2  
@Wrikken: I think Alexander wasn't addressing this issue. empty simple checks itself that the variable is set, so checking with isset is redundant. –  NikiC Aug 4 '10 at 18:44
1  
Ah, yes, forgot empty was a language construct indeed. –  Wrikken Aug 4 '10 at 18:51

Easy.

if (empty($_GET)) {
    // $_GET is empty
}
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if (!$_GET) echo "empty";

why do you need such a checking?

lol
you guys too direct-minded.
don't take as offense but sometimes not-minded at all
$_GET is very special variable, not like others.
it is supposed to be always set. no need to treat it as other variables. when $_GET is not set and it's expected - it is emergency case and that's what "Undefined variable" notice invented for

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1  
@mario got any example to demonstrate? –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 19:09
1  
@nikic well with notice you will be informed of that terrible sabotage act! What can be better? That is what error messages for - to tell you of such malicious programmers! I have told you it three times! Users will bullet you with complaint's, you come to check logs - voila! there is a problem - $_GET is not set! –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 20:26
1  
Off topic, I nowadays use object-style wrappers around $_GET, $_REQUEST and $_POST (which enforce input filtering). But that's a ultra specific case, where the _NOTICE-minded empty() folks would also fail. –  mario Aug 4 '10 at 20:32
1  
@niki I am not talking of your experience. I m talking of this very example from this very question. And I insist that there is no sensible scenario where you would need to use empty or isset. –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 21:05
1  
+1 because I feel this is a case when a notice should be triggered. for a script that expects to run in a web environment, this would be an exceptional condition worthy of an error because all of the possible causes are exceptionally rare. –  goat Jan 19 '13 at 8:25

I would use the following if statement because it is easier to read (and modify in the future)


if(!isset($_GET) || !is_array($_GET) || count($_GET)==0) {
   // empty, let's make sure it's an empty array for further reference
   $_GET=array();
   // or unset it 
   // or set it to null
   // etc...
}
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1  
if (!empty($_GET)) { } is even easier to read. empty() returns TRUE if an array doesn't contain items. –  kiamlaluno Aug 4 '10 at 18:52
    
what if $_GET is a string ? or an object? I've stumbled across scripts that messed up $_GET and i usually check if the variable is the type i "know" it should be... –  vlad b. Aug 4 '10 at 18:56
    
that's easy. just avoid such scripts :) Honestly, your code is overkill –  Your Common Sense Aug 4 '10 at 18:57
    
I guess you never had to integrate a few php scripts/systems without modifying them but trying to stop them from wreaking havoc when they are used in the same cron job or web page. It might be overkill but i sleep well at night. I usually sanitize, validate and check all variables before i use them if they can be modified by anybody else (via url, ini_set, or anything else). And i log ANY unexpected input (like $_GET not being an array) with all the possible info so i can recreate it at a later date to fix any bugs or special cases... –  vlad b. Aug 4 '10 at 19:58
    
Might be of interest... stackoverflow.com/questions/3388983/php-safe-get-or-not/… –  vlad b. Aug 4 '10 at 20:01

Here are 3 different methods to check this

<?php
//Method 1
if(!empty($_GET))
echo "exist";
else
echo "do not exist";
//Method 2
echo "<br>";
if($_GET)
echo "exist";
else
echo "do not exist";
//Method 3
if(count($_GET))
echo "exist";
else
echo "do not exist";
?>
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