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I'm trying to read a config file, and then place the "section" of configs into an array in a bash script, and then run a command off that, and then reitterate through the configs again, and continue to do this until the end of the config file.

Here's a sample config file:

PORT="5000"
USER="nobody"
PATH="1"
OPTIONS=""

PORT="5001"
USER="nobody"
PATH="1"
OPTIONS=""

PORT="5002"
USER="nobody"
PATH="1"
OPTIONS=""

I want the bash script to read in the first "section", bring it into the script, and run the following:
scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS

HOWEVER, I want it to, based on how many "sections" there are in the config file, to take each iteration of a "section", and run the command with its corresponding configuration settings and apply it to the final command. So if it were to read in the config file from above, the output would be:

scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS
scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS
scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS

Which in turn would look like:

scriptname -p 5000 -u nobody -P 1 -o ""
scriptname -p 5001 -u nobody -P 1 -o ""
scriptname -p 5002 -u nobody -P 1 -o ""

Thanks in advance.

share|improve this question
2  
Since this looks like a mini-language of your own design, do yourself a favor and have something other than whitespace demarcate the logical blocks. – msw Aug 4 '10 at 22:40
    
Right now, the whitespace blocks will have to do. This is basically a fix for another application - it's temporary, but a quick fix needs to be in place. I'm having to implement this into an init script. The config file needs to be simple. – drewrockshard Aug 4 '10 at 23:16
#!/bin/bash

if [[ $# -ne 1 ]]; then
    echo "Usage: $0 script.cfg" >&2
    exit 1
fi

function runscript() {
    scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS
}

while read LINE; do
    if [[ -n $LINE ]]; then
        declare "$LINE"
    else
        runscript
    fi
done < "$1"

runscript

If you want to run the scripts in the background simultaneously, try this:

function runscript() {
    nohup scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o $OPTIONS &> /dev/null &
}

The & at the end makes them run in the background and nohup ensures they're not killed when the shell exits. The net effect is to turn the scripts into daemons so they'll run continuously in the background regardless of what happens to the parent script.

share|improve this answer
    
I'm actually trying to implement this into a startup script. It works, however, it only runs one instance of the scriptname stanza. I changed the while loop to read in from a config file. Like I said, my mods work, BUT it only starts one program, not the other ones. – drewrockshard Aug 4 '10 at 23:13
    
Do you mean it only invokes the script once and then quits, or it invokes the script and blocks because the script doesn't exit? If it's the latter I've edited my answer to accommodate. If it's the former I'll need more info on what's not working--the script worked when I tested it with your sample config file. – John Kugelman Aug 5 '10 at 1:28
1  
You should change eval to declare. There are security risks with eval that declare avoids (even though in this case the input file is presumably safe, it's a good habit to change). You'll need to change the logic a bit. Something like [[ -z $LINE ]] && runscript || declare "$LINE" – Dennis Williamson Aug 5 '10 at 6:04
    
You don't need nohup if you're using disown – Hasturkun Aug 5 '10 at 13:20
#!/bin/bash

awk 'BEGIN{ FS="\n";RS=""}
{
  for(i=1;i<=NF;i++){
   gsub(/.[^=]*=|\042/,"",$i)
  }
  print "scriptname -p "$1" -u "$2" -P "$3" -o "$4
}' file | bash
share|improve this answer
    
That's a nice solution. In fact, you could replace print by system and get rid of the | bash. – Gilles Aug 5 '10 at 20:32
    
yes.that's another way provided its not a lot. If its a lot, piping to xargs and bash would be better than calling system(). – ghostdog74 Aug 6 '10 at 0:11

Assuming there is only one empty line between sections:

cat <yourfile> | while read ; do
    if [ -z "$REPLY" ] ; then
        scriptname -p $PORT -u $USER -P $PATH -o "$OPTIONS" 
    else
        eval "$REPLY" # NOTE: eval is evil
    fi
done
share|improve this answer
    
That's why you should change eval to declare - it works and it's safer. Oh, and cat is unnecessary. Use done < filename. If nothing else, it saves a call to an external executable. – Dennis Williamson Aug 5 '10 at 6:02
    
Thanks for the note on declare, I'll have to remember that. RE: cat -- old habits die hard :). – Kaleb Pederson Aug 5 '10 at 21:10

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