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I have two structs:

template <typename T>
struct Odp
{
    T m_t;

    T operator=(const T rhs)
    {
        return m_t = rhs;
    }
};

struct Ftw : public Odp<int>
{
    bool operator==(const Ftw& rhs)
    {
        return m_t == rhs.m_t;
    } 
};

I would like the following to compile:

int main()
{
    Odp<int> odp;
    odp = 2;

    Ftw f;
    f = 2; // C2679: no operator could be found
}

Is there any way to make this work, or must I define the operator in Ftw as well?

share|improve this question
    
Usually operator = takes const reference parameter... It would be better to change T operator=(const T rhs) to T operator=(const T& rhs) – a1ex07 Aug 4 '10 at 23:47
up vote 22 down vote accepted

The problem is that the compiler usually creates an operator= for you (unless you provide one), and this operator= hides the inherited one. You can overrule this by using-declaration:

struct Ftw : public Odp<int>
{
    using Odp<int>::operator=;
    bool operator==(const Ftw& rhs)
    {
        return m_t == rhs.m_t;
    } 
};
share|improve this answer
    
Nice! I didn't know about that. – Nick Heiner Aug 5 '10 at 0:06

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