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In C++, volatile is treated the same way const is: passing a pointer to volatile data to a function that doesn't want the volatile modifier triggers a compile error.

int foo(int* bar) { /* snip */ }

int main()
{
    volatile int* baz;
    foo(baz); // error: invalid conversion from ‘volatile int*’ to ‘int*’
}

Why is it dangerous? It's obvious for the const modifier that removing it can break const correctness; but is there such a thing as "volatile correctness"? I can't figure out how passing a pointer to volatile data as a pointer to non-volatile data could cause problems.

EDIT Just so you guys know why I was using volatile in the first place: many of Mac OS X's OSAtomic family of functions (for atomic increments, decrements, additions, subtractions, compare and swap, etc.) takes volatile arguments.

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If you say that "volatile is treated the same way const is", why be surprised if they give you similar error messages when you get rid of them like that? – dan04 Aug 4 '10 at 23:56
    
@dan04: I am not surprised at all that the compiler gave me this error knowing volatile and const are treated in a similar way. I would like to know, however, why they are treated in a similar way. – zneak Aug 4 '10 at 23:59
up vote 5 down vote accepted

Not only can the compiler optimize away access to non-volatile variables, it can update them predictively/speculatively, as long as the sequential execution of the program is unaffected.

If spurious writes to your volatile variable don't break your design, it probably didn't need to be volatile in any context.

For example, it is perfectly legal for the C++03 compiler to transform

int result;
void sum_if_all_positive( std::array<N> ary )
{
    int sum = 0;
    result = -1;
    for( int i = 0; i < N; ++i ) {
        if (ary[i] < 0) return;
        sum += ary[i];
    }
    result = sum;
}

into

int result;
void sum_if_all_positive( std::array<N> ary )
{
    result = 0;
    for( int i = 0; i < N; ++i ) {
        if (ary[i] < 0) { result = -1; return; }
        result += ary[i];
    }
}

(Although such a change would provide better performance than enregistering sum only on a few architectures with cheap memory access and very few registers. The Microchip PIC architecture comes to mind.)

share|improve this answer
    
Congratulations! You got it through my thick skull. – zneak Aug 5 '10 at 2:07
    
"optimize away" in the sense of caching in registers, possibly even only using registers and not having any memory associated with the variable. But, to say "can update them predictively/speculatively" here is ambiguous... I've never heard of a compiler modifying a memory location predictively/speculatively, and while it's vaguely plausible I assume you mean to say that a register caching/implementing a non-volatile variable may be updated in such a way...? But "If spurious writes to your volatile variable..." makes it sound like memory content itself is "threatened".... – Tony D Dec 6 '13 at 9:04
    
@Tony: Operations on a non-volatile variable of size one byte, mingled with other non-volatile variables, might be expressed as memory accesses of larger (i.e. machine word) size, coupled with compile-time bitshifts on constants and runtime masking. I'll add an example of an optimization falling into the "speculative" category. – Ben Voigt Dec 6 '13 at 16:35

Because the volatile modifier means that the compiler must take care to actually perform each read/write of the volatile data item exactly as the C standard's 'abstract machine' specifies.

When the volatile modifier is stripped away, the data accesses can be optimized away as long as the program behaves 'as if' the access occurred as far as the single-threaded viewpoint of the program flow of control is concerned. In other words, the compiler can treat a non-volatile piece of data as if the compiler and only the compiler can see and can modify the data item (which is the case in the vast majority of cases).

The volatile keyword tells the compiler that something else (hardware or another thread of execution) can modify or see that data item, so the compiler isn't permitted to optimize away accesses.

If you could pass a pointer to a volatile piece of data to a function that took a non-volatile pointer without warning, the function might not see a change in the data that might occur. If you don't care about that, you might be able to code up a nice, portable workaround (depending on what foo() does with the data):

int foo(int* bar) { /* snip */ }

int main()
{
    volatile int* baz;

    int tmp = *baz;
    foo(&tmp);
    *baz = tmp;
}
share|improve this answer
    
So what kind of problem can it cause? – zneak Aug 4 '10 at 23:54
1  
@zneak - that really depends on what foo() does and on what the volatile data item does (or why it's volatile). In general, since volatile data is used for very specific things (hardware registers or communication between threads), it usually doesn't make sense for something that's not specifically written to deal with the exact volatile 'thing' to do anything with it. Note that it's often the case that for the volatile thing to really work correct, some other platform specific work must be done (like flushing memory barriers). – Michael Burr Aug 4 '10 at 23:59
4  
@zneak Suppose that baz pointed to a memory-mapped hardware register. Without the volatile qualifier on bar, within foo, the compiler would be within its rights to cache the value of *bar in a cpu register, which would miss asynchronous hardware-driven changes to the value of *bar, or optimize away writes to *bar, which would affect what signals are sent to the hardware. Concerns like this would be why baz is a volatile pointer in the first place, so stripping the volatile would re-introduce the potential problems that the volatile qualifier was supposed to avoid. – Tyler McHenry Aug 5 '10 at 0:01

Well, in foo() the compiler no longer knows that baz (or more strictly bar) is volatile and so may attempt to apply some inappropriate optimisations.

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2  
Your answer is extremely vague. Could you give a few examples of situations in which the compiler could apply an optimization that will make the code dangerous? – zneak Aug 4 '10 at 23:51
    
@zneak What do you imagine the purpose of volatile is? It is precisely to prevent optimisation of, for example, caching a variable in a register and not reading it from memory on every access in the program source. – anon Aug 4 '10 at 23:54
2  
@zneak It is not at all useful in threading. The classic use is in memory mapped I/O where the contents of a memory location may change outwith program control, and so must be read on every access. If the compiler optimised such accesses, changes could be missed. – anon Aug 5 '10 at 0:01
1  
@Klee1 Well, unless you expand on that, what can I say except you think wrong. – anon Aug 5 '10 at 0:35
1  
@KLee1 You think wrong. volatile is only "useful" for threading if you are doing synchronization wrong, so it's not useful at all. – Tyler McHenry Aug 5 '10 at 0:36

The volatile keyword means that the value should be loaded and stored from/to memory every time.

Consider the code:

int foo(int* bar) { 
    while(*bar){ 
        //Do something...
    }
}

int main()
{
    volatile int num = 1;
    volatile int* baz = &num;
    //Start a seperate thread to change *baz evenutally... 
    foo(baz);
}

When the compiler sees the while loop, and knows that what is pointed to by bar is always going to be 1. Why should it have to check every time? It would be extremely wasteful to check every time. volatile makes sure that the compiler does do this check every time, so when the other thread changes the value, the while loop exits.

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1  
Dude, your example is broken. Not using the volatile keyword when you need it has different consequences than when you don't use it when you don't need it. – zneak Aug 5 '10 at 0:03
1  
The compiler doesn't know when you don't need it. If you don't need it, then why are you using it? – KLee1 Aug 5 '10 at 0:10
    
It's not because foo doesn't need it the rest of my code doesn't need it either. (Please specify @zneak somewhere in your comments so I get notified.) – zneak Aug 5 '10 at 0:16
1  
@zneak If none of your code needs baz to be volatile, then why is it? – KLee1 Aug 5 '10 at 0:20
    
@KLee1: Some of my code needs it, and some doesn't. This is what I tried to say in my previous comment, sorry if it was unclear. – zneak Aug 5 '10 at 0:22

Yes, there is such a thing as "volatile correctness".

It is used to help ensure safety in multithreaded code.

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Almost all my sources indicate that volatile (in its standard form, not in its modified Visual C++ form) is next to useless when it comes to multithreading because it does not emit memory barriers. Even though the compiler emits the store instruction, the CPU may very well not commit that write immediately (keeping it to the cache) or not do it in the expected order, and as such it's not helping at all. – zneak Nov 10 '12 at 6:07
    
The real reason for volatile (again, in its standard form), as I understand it, is when it comes to memory-mappend IO. For instance, a device may need a specific sequence of write operations (say "write 0xdead" then write "0xbeef") to a memory location to work correctly, and in C code that would become *reg = 0xdead; *reg = 0xbeef;. Without volatile, the compiler may omit the first write, and because of that our device gets no chance to work correctly. And in that case, yes, volatile correctness is real and necessary. – zneak Nov 10 '12 at 6:10
    
I was confused about this two years ago because I did not realize that volatile, as you're saying, really behaves the same as const (and that's why some compilers refer to both as "cv-modifiers", and in C++ you need a const_cast to un-volatile something). This means that an API that accepts a pointer to volatile data is not trying to tell you that you should use volatile data; it's merely telling that it's acceptable for it to receive volatile data. And this is a world of difference. – zneak Nov 10 '12 at 6:13
    
@zneak: Are you sure you actually read the article I linked to? Given that you jumped to the topic of memory barriers and such, I think you're thinking of a different kind of safety (or lack thereof) than what the article is talking about. – Mehrdad Nov 10 '12 at 6:25
    
I, in fact, did not read the link. For my defence, I would like to say that the argumentation of "volatile is useful for multithreading" is a common one that I believe is incorrect. I have read it to answer your comment, and I am still not convinced. With that store operation the compiler is now forced to emit, we know the value won't reside in memory, but what if the CPU or core decides to keep it in cache instead of the (still slower) memory? We're back to the starting point. To ensure that the CPU cache is flushed too, we still need more than volatile. – zneak Nov 10 '12 at 7:13

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