Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

I need to round a float to be displayed in a UI. E.g, to one significant figure:

1234 -> 1000

0.12 -> 0.1

0.012 -> 0.01

0.062 -> 0.06

6253 -> 6000

1999 -> 2000

Is there a nice way to do this using the Python library, or do I have to write it myself?

share|improve this question
1  
Are you just formatting the output? Are you asking about this? docs.python.org/library/stdtypes.html#string-formatting or this? docs.python.org/library/string.html#string-formatting – S.Lott Aug 5 '10 at 0:53
    
what output do you expect for 0.062 and 6253? – lamirap Aug 5 '10 at 0:58
up vote 68 down vote accepted

You can use negative numbers to round integers:

>>> round(1234, -3)
1000.0

Thus if you need only most significant digit:

>>> from math import log10, floor
>>> def round_to_1(x):
...   return round(x, -int(floor(log10(abs(x)))))
... 
>>> round_to_1(0.0232)
0.02
>>> round_to_1(1234243)
1000000.0
>>> round_to_1(13)
10.0
>>> round_to_1(4)
4.0
>>> round_to_1(19)
20.0

You'll probably have to take care of turning float to integer if it's bigger than 1.

share|improve this answer
    
This is the correct solution. Using log10 is the only proper way to determine how to round it. – Wolph Aug 5 '10 at 3:23
    
How would you adapt this to allow the user to choose an arbitrary number of significant figures? This solution is only good for 1 sig fig. – Elliot Apr 23 '13 at 22:50
27  
round_to_n = lambda x, n: round(x, -int(floor(log10(x))) + (n - 1)) – Roy Hyunjin Han Apr 30 '13 at 19:30
10  
You should use log10(abs(x)), otherwise negative numbers will fail (And treat x == 0 separately of course) – Tobias Kienzler Jul 30 '13 at 8:06
1  
@RicardoCruz No worries :D I took the liberty of editing the answer, since Evgeny hasn't been around ever since before I left that comment... – Tobias Kienzler Jan 7 at 6:44

%g in string formatting will format a float rounded to some number of significant figures. It will sometimes use 'e' scientific notation, so convert the rounded string back to a float then through %s string formatting.

>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 1234)
'1000'
>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 0.12)
'0.1'
>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 0.012)
'0.01'
>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 0.062)
'0.06'
>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 6253)
'6000.0'
>>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 1999)
'2000.0'
share|improve this answer
    
For me it was: >>> '%s' % float('%.1g' % 1234) '1000.0' – Evgeny Aug 5 '10 at 16:31
4  
The OP's requirement was for 1999 to be formatted as '2000', not as '2000.0'. I can't see a trivial way to change your method to achieve this. – Tim Martin Jan 14 '11 at 16:04
    
This is incredibly useful, thank you! – weronika Feb 14 '12 at 20:49
    
It's just what I always wanted! where'd you find this? – djhaskin987 Jul 19 '13 at 20:34
5  
Note that the behaviour of %g is not always correct. In particular it always trims trailing zeros even if they are significant. The number 1.23400 has 6 significant digits, but "%.6g" %(1.23400) will result in "1.234" which is incorrect. More details in this blog post: randlet.com/blog/python-significant-figures-format – randlet Oct 29 '13 at 17:49

If you want to have other than 1 significant decimal (otherwise the same as Evgeny):

>>> from math import log10, floor
>>> def round_sig(x, sig=2):
...   return round(x, sig-int(floor(log10(x)))-1)
... 
>>> round_sig(0.0232)
0.023
>>> round_sig(0.0232, 1)
0.02
>>> round_sig(1234243, 3)
1230000.0
share|improve this answer
5  
round_sig(-0.0232) -> math domain error, you may want to add an abs() in there ;) – dgorissen Dec 19 '11 at 14:18

I can't think of anything that would be able to handle this out of the box. But it's fairly well handled for floating point numbers.

>>> round(1.2322, 2)
1.23

Integers are trickier. They're not stored as base 10 in memory, so significant places isn't a natural thing to do. It's fairly trivial to implement once they're a string though.

Or for integers:

>>> def intround(n, sigfigs):
...   n = str(n)
...   return n[:sigfigs] + ('0' * (len(n)-(sigfigs)))

>>> intround(1234, 1)
'1000'
>>> intround(1234, 2)

If you would like to create a function that handles any number, my preference would be to convert them both to strings and look for a decimal place to decide what to do:

>>> def roundall1(n, sigfigs):
...   n = str(n)
...   try:
...     sigfigs = n.index('.')
...   except ValueError:
...     pass
...   return intround(n, sigfigs)

Another option is to check for type. This will be far less flexible, and will probably not play nicely with other numbers such as Decimal objects:

>>> def roundall2(n, sigfigs):
...   if type(n) is int: return intround(n, sigfigs)
...   else: return round(n, sigfigs)
share|improve this answer
    
Just messing with strings won't round the numbers. 1999 rounded to 1 significant figure is 2000, not 1000. – Peter Graham Aug 5 '10 at 2:43
    
Ah! Of course, that's right - let me think for a moment or two... – Tim McNamara Aug 5 '10 at 2:45
    
There is a good discussion of this problem archived at ActiveState code.activestate.com/lists/python-tutor/70739 – Tim McNamara Aug 5 '10 at 2:54

To round an integer to 1 significant figure the basic idea is to convert it to a floating point with 1 digit before the point and round that, then convert it back to its original integer size.

To do this we need to know the largest power of 10 less than the integer. We can use floor of the log 10 function for this.

from math import log10, floor
def round_int(i,places):
    if i == 0:
        return 0
    isign = i/abs(i)
    i = abs(i)
    if i < 1:
        return 0
    max10exp = floor(log10(i))
    if max10exp+1 < places:
        return i
    sig10pow = 10**(max10exp-places+1)
    floated = i*1.0/sig10pow
    defloated = round(floated)*sig10pow
    return int(defloated*isign)
share|improve this answer
1  
Plus one for solution which works without python's round(.., digits) and no strings attached! – Steve Rogers Jun 11 '12 at 6:52
    
thanks Steve, good old Python eh! – Cris Stringfellow Jun 11 '12 at 10:47

Focusing on "I need to round a float to be displayed in a UI", string formatting is your friend.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.