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I'm converting a VB.net library to C# and having trouble finding the C# equivalent to a VB.Net Public Module.

In the same VB class is a With block. Any idea what the equivalent might be for that as well.

TIA Steve Campos

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Did you try converter.telerik.com ? –  Chase Florell Aug 5 '10 at 0:53
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2 Answers

Unfortunately there is no equivalent of a VB.Net module in C#. The closest thing is a static class. Both define a object which cannot have instance members but they have different semantics. The largest being that for VB.Net if a Module is in scope it's members can be accessed without qualification

Module Example 
  Public Function Sum(x as Integer, y As Integer) As Integer
    return x + y
  End Function
End Module

Class C1
  Sub Method1() 
    Dim x = Sum(13,42)
  End Sub 
Class

C# does not have this feature and requires qualified access for static class members.

There are a couple of other smaller differences

  • Module members are implicitly shared while static class members require explicit static qualifiers
  • Some minor trivia in the structure of the generated types
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"The largest being that for VB.Net if a Module is in scope it's members can be accessed without qualification"- This is due to how VB.NET handles namespaces and has nothing to do with "Modules" which are just a class in the "global" namespace. (This is not technically accurate, but not much room in a comment. Check out MSDN for more information.) –  AMissico Aug 5 '10 at 13:30
    
@AMissico, it has everything to do with Modules. They are the only construct which introduces members into their containing namespace without qualification. –  JaredPar Aug 5 '10 at 15:27
    
VB.NET does this introduction, not the module. The module is just ".class public auto ansi sealed <namespace>.<module>". Check the generated IL. The VB.NET Compiler converts the module into a class. There is nothing special about a module. It is the VB.NET Compiler that makes it special. –  AMissico Aug 5 '10 at 18:17
    
@AMissico, I'm not sure what you're arguing at this poitn. My statement is that VB.Net Modules have semantic differences within VB.Net than C# static classes do within C#. The do compile down to similar structures (not identical, check the attributes) but that does not change the correctness of my statement. –  JaredPar Aug 5 '10 at 18:59
    
Then your point was not clear. –  AMissico Aug 5 '10 at 19:01
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There is no With equivalent.

Depending on version, you can do:

var myCommand = new SqlCommand(SpMainInsert, myConnection) {
    CommandType = System.Data.CommandType.StoredProcedure
};

Module Definition

This is the correct definition based on the default declaration when creating a Module (Module template item) in a VB.NET Project. The private constructor is part of the declaration, regardless if it is required or not. This C# "Module Definition" is taken from a Microsoft resource many years back. I do not have reference to the source right now, but will try to post later.

internal { sealed | static } class Module1 {
    #if sealed
        private Module1() { }
    #endif
    public static void Method1() { }
    public static string Method2() { return "here"; }
} 

Calling Module Methods

    Module1.Method1();
    string foo = Module1.Method2();
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no need for private constructor with static keyword –  dkackman Aug 5 '10 at 1:10
2  
no need for "sealed" with static either, and whether or not "internal" is correct depends on how the original Module is declared. –  Joel Coehoorn Aug 5 '10 at 1:13
    
This is the correct definition based on the default declaration when creating a Module in a VB.NET Project. The private constructor is part of the declaration. This C# "Module Definition" is taken from Microsoft souces many years back. I do not have reference right now, but will try to post later. –  AMissico Aug 5 '10 at 13:22
    
@AMissico, static classes are implicitly sealed. Adding the sealed keyword is a compile time error. As is adding a private constructor. –  JaredPar Aug 5 '10 at 19:58
    
@JaredPar: It is just syntax to show the user what a Module looks like in C# and how to make the function calls. –  AMissico Aug 5 '10 at 23:08
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