Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

And why is an export needed? Where is it exporting to?

share|improve this question
    
possible duplicate of bash: defining a variable with or without export –  Dennis Williamson Aug 5 '10 at 5:48
    
I'm still wondering about "where is it exporting to." Is it being saved somewhere permanently? –  punstress Sep 24 '13 at 3:01
    
If I just type the command export alone in Cygwin, I get a big list of env vars. So I exported one I needed for a program and then typed export again and sure enough it showed up there. However, it did not show up when I looked under My Computer > Advanced > Environment Variables (Win XP), and I checked both User and System. I kind of expected it to be there, so I'm a little stumped, because those env vars and others showed up in the big list. If it had been there, I could have clicked Delete. I wonder where it is ... ? –  punstress Sep 25 '13 at 9:36

2 Answers 2

up vote 7 down vote accepted

Exported variables are passed on to new processes invoked.

Try setting A=1, then invoking a new shell by entering "bash", then echo $A - an empty line.

Do the same, but then export A=1, invoke a new shell, then echo $A - voila!

edit on the technical side, and looking at your question, B=1 doesn't actually set an environment variable. To get the real environment of your shell (in linux), try

$ xargs -n 1 -0 echo < /proc/$$/environ

which differs from the output of export. And as a sidenote, this question touches on the internals of bash and its environment handling.

share|improve this answer

The PS1 environment variable is pre-defined by the bash shell; consequently, it doesn't need to be exported, merely set.

share|improve this answer
    
Nope, it doesn't need to be exported, because the only one needing it is bash itself, and not it's (grand)children. –  mvds Aug 5 '10 at 2:25
1  
@mvds No, it doesn't need to be exported because it's already an environment variable. –  Steve Emmerson Aug 5 '10 at 2:59
1  
3 checks say that's not true (by default in bash 3.2.39) : 1) export |grep PS1 2) xargs -n 1 -0 echo < /proc/$$/environ and 3) echo "main(int i,char**v,char**e){while(*e)printf(\"%s\n\",*e++);}" | gcc -x c - && ./a.out |grep PS1. set however does show PS1. Note that all of these methods show PATH which I believe is a true "environment variable" (don't know your exact definition btw) –  mvds Aug 5 '10 at 10:28
1  
@mvds Good lord, you're right! My mistake. –  Steve Emmerson Aug 5 '10 at 20:44

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.