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I recently pointed a student doing work experience to an article about dumping a multiplication table to the console. It used a nested for loop and multiplied the step value of each.

This looked like a .NET 2.0 approach. I was wondering, with the use of Linq and extension methods,for example, how many lines of code it would take to achieve the same result.

Is the stackoverflow community up to the challenge?

The challenge: In a console application, write code to generate a table like this example:

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09
02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18
03 06 09 12 15 18 21 24 27
04 08 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
05 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
06 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54
07 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63
08 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72
09 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

As this turned into a language-agnostic code-golf battle, I'll go with the communities decision about which is the best solution for the accepted answer.

There's been alot of talk about the spec and the format that the table should be in, I purposefully added the 00 format but the double new-line was originally only there because I didn't know how to format the text when creating the post!

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locked by Shog9 Apr 3 at 16:46

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3  
I can write any program in one line of code :) –  starskythehutch Aug 5 '10 at 7:54
6  
You can write it in one line and still be readable. hint: Console.Write("01 02 03 04... –  John La Rooy Aug 5 '10 at 11:24
11  
code-golf is usually language-agnostic –  John La Rooy Aug 5 '10 at 11:24
9  
I do think it's cute that C# people like to talk about smallest number of lines. code-golf is about smallest number of characters –  John La Rooy Aug 5 '10 at 11:26
3  
@Svish: my elementary school times tables ended at 9, now I feel totally gypped.. How was I ever supposed to know what 10 times anything was?? Man I sure dodged a bullet on that one figuring it out on my own.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 5 '10 at 17:12

40 Answers 40

up vote 42 down vote accepted

J - 8 chars - 24 chars for proper format

*/~1+i.9

Gives:

1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18
3  6  9 12 15 18 21 24 27
4  8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54
7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63
8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72
9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

This solution found by @earl:

'r(0)q( )3.'8!:2*/~1+i.9

Gives:

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 
02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18 
03 06 09 12 15 18 21 24 27 
04 08 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 
05 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 
06 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 
07 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 
08 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 
09 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 
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8  
Consider my mind blown. –  Aistina Aug 5 '10 at 17:24
37  
This is the worst C# I've ever seen –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 5 '10 at 17:27
3  
@MPelletier: The only reason I ever played golf was the beer carts they bring around to you, I don't really care what language they speak as long as it's cold –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 5 '10 at 18:05
2  
earl posted the same answer 3 hours earlier but deleted it for some reason –  John La Rooy Aug 5 '10 at 18:33
21  
Yeah, I deleted the answer because I considered it off-topic for a C# code-golfing question. Seems the "language-agnostic" tag has been added since. My answer also contained an extended version doing zero padding: 'r(0)q( )3.' 8!:2 */~1+i.9. Feel free to upvote this comment if you want to give props :) –  earl Aug 5 '10 at 22:08

MATLAB - 10 characters

a=1:9;a'*a

... or 33 characters for stricter output format

a=1:9;disp(num2str(a'*a,'%.2d '))
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1  
Nice! utterly simple and to the point –  Darknight Aug 6 '10 at 8:40
1  
This is not a correct answer. It prints "ans =" and a blank line prior to showing the table which contains many extra spaces and no 0-padding. I doubt the formatting will be as compact as this. Still a good try. –  phkahler Aug 6 '10 at 12:39
2  
@phkahler: Admittedly, I took some liberties, since there didn't seem to be an explicit set of output rules, merely that it should generate a multiplication table. I don't like the zero padding because it makes the numbers a little harder to read, but here's a 33-character solution that generates output more like the example: a=1:9;disp(num2str(a'*a,'%.2d ')) –  gnovice Aug 6 '10 at 14:06
2  
@gnovice: to be exact, the formatting string should be '%02d ' –  Amro Aug 23 '10 at 13:34

Brainf**k - 185 chars

>---------[++++++++++>---------[+<[-<+>>+++++++++[->+>>---------[>-<++++++++++<]<[>]>>+<<<<]>[-<+>]<---------<]<[->+<]>>>>++++[-<++++>]<[->++>+++>+++<<<]>>>[.[-]<]<]++++++++++.[-<->]<+]
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15  
This looks like a timeline of a dagger mating with a fish corpse. –  Sam Pearson Aug 5 '10 at 21:01
13  
I like how the word brain is censored, and not f**k. –  dreamlax Aug 5 '10 at 21:11
1  
@Michael Mrozek: I don't understand, do we have 8 year old programmers browsing this site with a net nanny or who honestly won't know what two letters belong under those asterisks? –  dreamlax Aug 6 '10 at 0:52

cat - 252 characters

01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09

02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18

03 06 09 12 15 18 21 24 27

04 08 12 16 20 24 28 32 36

05 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45

06 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54

07 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63

08 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72

09 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

Assuming that a trailing newline is wanted; otherwise, 251 chars.

* runs *

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8  
+1 because this should be the benchmark. Any language that can't beat this should not even bother to apply. –  slebetman Aug 9 '10 at 5:33

Python - 61 chars

r=range(1,10)
for y in r:print"%02d "*9%tuple(y*x for x in r)
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5  
@Jimmy Hoffa: You misspelled "Perl". –  Javier Aug 5 '10 at 18:24

C#

This is only 2 lines. It uses lambdas not extension methods

 var nums = new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 };
 nums.ForEach(n => { nums.ForEach(n2 => Console.Write((n * n2).ToString("00 "))); Console.WriteLine(); });

and of course it could be done in one long unreadable line

 new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }.ForEach(n => { new List<int>() { 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 }.ForEach(n2 => Console.Write((n * n2).ToString("00 "))); Console.WriteLine(); });

all of this is assuming you consider a labmda one line?

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5  
amazing how you were able to get these TWO lines into a SINGLE one :> –  atamanroman Aug 6 '10 at 8:49

K - 12 characters

Let's take the rosetta-stoning seriously, and compare Kdb+'s K4 with the canonical J solution (*/~1+i.9):

  a*/:\:a:1+!9
1 2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 
2 4  6  8  10 12 14 16 18
3 6  9  12 15 18 21 24 27
4 8  12 16 20 24 28 32 36
5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54
7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63
8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72
9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

J's "table" operator (/) equals the K "each-left each-right" (/:\:) idiom. We don't have J's extremely handy "reflexive" operator (~) in K, so we have to pass a as both left and right argument.

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1  
I also consider the purely tacit definition of J is more elegant in this case. But in general, K strikes a very nice balance with it's selection of built-ins. And just in case: a simple R:{x[y;y]} allows you to write the above tacitly as R[*/:\:]1+!9. –  earl Aug 6 '10 at 10:04

Fortran95 - 40 chars (beating perl by 4 chars!)

This solution does print the leading zeros as per the spec.

print"(9(i3.2))",((i*j,i=1,9),j=1,9);end
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Oracle SQL, 103 characters:

select n, n*2, n*3, n*4, n*5, n*6, n*7, n*8, n*9 from (select rownum n from dual CONNECT BY LEVEL < 10)
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1  
@TTT: and even many characters shorter with trimming of unnecessary space! –  Benoit Sep 29 '11 at 15:48

COBOL - 218 chars -> 216 chars

PROGRAM-ID.P.DATA DIVISION.WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
1 I PIC 9.
1 N PIC 99.
PROCEDURE DIVISION.PERFORM 9 TIMES
ADD 1 TO I
SET N TO I
PERFORM 9 TIMES
DISPLAY N' 'NO ADVANCING
ADD I TO N
END-PERFORM
DISPLAY''
END-PERFORM.

Edit

216 chars (probably a different compiler)

PROGRAM-ID.P.DATA DIVISION.WORKING-STORAGE SECTION.
1 I PIC 9.
1 N PIC 99.
PROCEDURE DIVISION.

  PERFORM B 9 TIMES
  STOP RUN.

B.
 ADD 1 TO I
 set N to I
 PERFORM C 9 TIMES
 DISPLAY''.

C.
 DISPLAY N" "NO ADVANCING
 Add I TO N.
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2  
I can't quite put my finger on it, but for some reason this is my favorite. –  Nick Larsen Aug 6 '10 at 14:13

C# - 117, 113, 99, 96, 95 89 characters

updated based on NickLarsen's idea

for(int x=0,y;++x<10;)
    for(y=x;y<x*10;y+=x)
        Console.Write(y.ToString(y<x*9?"00 ":"00 \n"));

99, 85, 82 81 characters ... If you don't care about the leading zeros and would allow tabs for alignment.

for(int x=0,y;++x<10;)
{
    var w="";
    for(y=1;++y<10;)
        w+=x*y+"    ";
    Console.WriteLine(w);
}
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2  
Does not compile. Message: A namespace does not directly contain members such as fields or methods. –  Nick Larsen Aug 5 '10 at 21:19
2  
Make sure you included using System.Linq; and that the above code is inside of a method body. –  Matthew Whited Aug 5 '10 at 22:07

Not really a one-liner, but the shortest linq i can think of:

var r = Enumerable.Range(1, 9);
foreach (var z in r.Select(n => r.Select(m => n * m)).Select(a => a.Select(b => b.ToString("00 "))))
{
    foreach (var q in z)
        Console.Write(q);
    Console.WriteLine();
}

In response to combining this and SRuly's answer

Enumberable.Range(1,9).ToList.ForEach(n => Enumberable.Range(1,9).ToList.ForEach(n2 => Console.Write((n * n2).ToString("00 "))); Console.WriteLine(); });

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Ruby - 42 Chars (including one linebreak, interactive command line only)

This method is two lines of input and only works in irb (because irb gives us _), but shortens the previous method by a scant 2 charcters.

1..9
_.map{|y|puts"%02d "*9%_.map{|x|x*y}}

Ruby - 44 Chars (tied with perl)

(a=1..9).map{|y|puts"%02d "*9%a.map{|x|x*y}}

Ruby - 46 Chars

9.times{|y|puts"%02d "*9%(1..9).map{|x|x*y+x}}

Ruby - 47 Chars

And back to a double loop

(1..9).map{|y|puts"%02d "*9%(1..9).map{|x|x*y}}

Ruby - 54 chars!

Using a single loop saves a couple of chars!

(9..89).map{|n|print"%02d "%(n/9*(x=n%9+1))+"\n"*(x/9)}

Ruby - 56 chars

9.times{|x|puts (1..9).map{|y|"%.2d"%(y+x*y)}.join(" ")}
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Haskell — 85 84 79 chars

r=[1..9]
s x=['0'|x<=9]++show x
main=mapM putStrLn[unwords[s$x*y|x<-r]|y<-r]

If double spacing is required (89 81 chars),

r=[1..9]
s x=['0'|x<=9]++show x
main=mapM putStrLn['\n':unwords[s$x*y|x<-r]|y<-r]
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F# - 61 chars:

for y=1 to 9 do(for x=1 to 9 do printf"%02d "(x*y));printfn""

If you prefer a more applicative/LINQ-y solution, then in 72 chars:

[1..9]|>Seq.iter(fun y->[1..9]|>Seq.iter((*)y>>printf"%02d ");printfn"")
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c# - 125, 123 chars (2 lines):

var r=Enumerable.Range(1,9).ToList();
r.ForEach(n=>{var s="";r.ForEach(m=>s+=(n*m).ToString("00 "));Console.WriteLine(s);});
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PostgreSQL: 81 74 chars

select array(select generate_series(1,9)*x)from generate_series(1,9)as x;
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C - 97 79 characters

#define f(i){int i=0;while(i++<9)
main()f(x)f(y)printf("%.2d ",x*y);puts("");}}
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Perl, 44 chars

(No hope of coming anywhere near J, but languages with matrix ops are in a class of their own here...)

for$n(1..9){printf"%3d"x9 .$/,map$n*$_,1..9}
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R (very similar to Matlab on this level): 12 characters.

> 1:9%*%t(1:9)
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4] [,5] [,6] [,7] [,8] [,9]
[1,]    1    2    3    4    5    6    7    8    9
[2,]    2    4    6    8   10   12   14   16   18
[3,]    3    6    9   12   15   18   21   24   27
[4,]    4    8   12   16   20   24   28   32   36
[5,]    5   10   15   20   25   30   35   40   45
[6,]    6   12   18   24   30   36   42   48   54
[7,]    7   14   21   28   35   42   49   56   63
[8,]    8   16   24   32   40   48   56   64   72
[9,]    9   18   27   36   45   54   63   72   81
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PHP, 71 chars

for($x=0;++$x<10;print"\n"){for($y=0;++$y<10;){printf("%02d ",$x*$y);}}

Output:

$ php -r 'for($x=0;++$x<10;print"\n"){for($y=0;++$y<10;){printf("%02d ",$x*$y);}}'
01 02 03 04 05 06 07 08 09 
02 04 06 08 10 12 14 16 18 
03 06 09 12 15 18 21 24 27 
04 08 12 16 20 24 28 32 36 
05 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45 
06 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54 
07 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63 
08 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72 
09 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81 
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C#, 135 chars, nice and clean:

var rg = Enumerable.Range(1, 9);
foreach (var rc in from r in rg 
                   from c in rg 
                   select (r * c).ToString("D2") + (c == 9 ? "\n\n" : " "))
    Console.Write(rc);
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Ruby - 56 chars :D

9.times{|a|9.times{|b|print"%02d "%((a+1)*(b+1))};puts;}
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C - 66 Chars

This resolves the complaint about the second parameter of main :)

main(x){for(x=8;x++<89;)printf("%.2d%c",x/9*(x%9+1),x%9<8?32:10);}

C - 77 chars

Based on dreamlax's 97 char answer. His current answer somewhat resembles this one now :)

Compiles ok with gcc, and main(x,y) is fair game for golf i reckon

#define f(i){for(i=0;i++<9;)
main(x,y)f(x)f(y)printf("%.2d ",x*y);puts("");}}
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XQuery 1.0 (96 bytes)

string-join(for$x in 1 to 9 return(for$y in 1 to 9 return concat(0[$x*$y<10],$x*$y,' '),'

'),'')

Run (with XQSharp) with:

xquery table.xq !method=text
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Scala - 77 59 58 chars

print(1 to 9 map(p=>1 to 9 map(q=>"%02d "format(p*q))mkString)mkString("\n"))

Sorry, I had to do this, the Scala solution by Malax was way too readable...

[Edit] For comprehension seems to be the better choice:

for(p<-1 to 9;q<-{println;1 to 9})print("%02d "format p*q)

[Edit] A much longer solution, but without multiplication, and much more obfuscated:

val s=(1 to 9).toSeq
(s:\s){(p,q)=>println(q.map("%02d "format _)mkString)
q zip(s)map(t=>t._1+t._2)}
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PHP, 62 chars

for(;$x++<9;print"\n",$y=0)while($y++<9)printf("%02d ",$x*$y);
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Java - 155 137 chars


  • Update 1: replaced string building by direct printing. Saved 18 chars.

class M{public static void main(String[]a){for(int x,y=0,z=10;++y<z;System.out.println())for(x=0;++x<z;System.out.printf("%02d ",x*y));}}

More readable format:

class M{
 public static void main(String[]a){
  for(int x,y=0,z=10;++y<z;System.out.println())
   for(x=0;++x<z;System.out.printf("%02d ",x*y));
 }
}
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Another attempt using C#/Linq with GroupJoin:

Console.Write(
    String.Join(
        Environment.NewLine,
        Enumerable.Range(1, 9)
            .GroupJoin(Enumerable.Range(1, 9), y => 0, x => 0, (y, xx) => String.Join(" ", xx.Select(x => x * y)))
            .ToArray()));
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Ruby — 47 chars

puts (a=1..9).map{|i|a.map{|j|"%2d"%(j*i)}*" "}

Output

 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9
 2  4  6  8 10 12 14 16 18
 3  6  9 12 15 18 21 24 27
 4  8 12 16 20 24 28 32 36
 5 10 15 20 25 30 35 40 45
 6 12 18 24 30 36 42 48 54
 7 14 21 28 35 42 49 56 63
 8 16 24 32 40 48 56 64 72
 9 18 27 36 45 54 63 72 81

(If we ignore spacing, it becomes 39: puts (a=1..9).map{|i|a.map{|j|j*i}*" "} And anyway, I feel like there's a bit of room for improvement with the wordy map stuff.)

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