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I have a website depending on vector drawing, for internet explorer i'm using VML and for other browsers i'm using SVG. IE8 however, doesn't have support for neither without falling back to IE7-mode which has VML.

Therefore i'm including <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" />.

The problem (well, actually a good thing) is that IE9 now has support for SVG so i don't want it to fall back to IE7-mode which has much worse performance and compatibility. How do i tell only IE8 to fall back to IE7-mode but let IE9 stay in IE9-mode.

Right now i'm doing a server side check on the agent whether to include the EmulateIE7-string in the head or not but i want to avoid this as far as it's possible.

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6  
IE 8 does support VML, it just changes the way you declare it/handle it. e.g., you need to use -ms-behavior instead of behavior. More at ajaxian.com/archives/the-vml-changes-in-ie-8. –  Andy E Aug 5 '10 at 10:25
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IE8 Standards Mode does support VML. There are all sorts of problems with it (changes, new bugs, and poor peformance), but in principle it should be possible to make it work. Microsoft seem to be letting the VML implementation degrade with each browser version; presumably they consider it a dying technology. –  bobince Aug 5 '10 at 10:25
    
Oh, doing additional work to get 10x performance decrease and extra bugs isn't exactly tempting. –  Urjan Aug 9 '10 at 14:57
    
So did you end up sticking with the server-side check with EmulateIE7? –  Jon Galloway Sep 24 '10 at 16:52
    
Hello Urjan - please take a second to choose an answer. –  donohoe Feb 18 '13 at 18:34

8 Answers 8

I just had a play and found the following works for me:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7,IE=9" >

That is with a comma not a semi colon! You can try it out using this modified copy of John Lascurettes' page (i.e. emological.com).

I haven't looked at the spec, but the format is similar to content="IE=7,chrome=1" that works for Chrome Frame. I also found that content="IE=7,9" works but I suspect that is not a correct format.

Edit:

Beware of a serious problem if your page is in a iframe. If you use the above in a framed page where the parent is in any mode less than IE9 strict, then IE9 will fall back to IE8 mode (ignoring the IE=7 request!). Any known workarounds welcome :)

The above seems to be a side effect of the by design feature, that iframes (and I presume frames) are either all in IE9 mode, or all are less than IE9 mode. One can never mix IE9 frames with < IE9 frames, see MS issues #599022 and #635648.

Edit 2:

Beware that IE11 only supports "IE=edge" (not IE=11), and that using IE=edge has significant effects upon IE functionality (including the user agent).

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1  
Has anyone else tried this yet? –  robocat Dec 17 '10 at 5:13
    
Yes, it works perfectly. Using comma is vital here. Also, I am not sure about using IE=7 instead of IE=EmulateIE7. –  unclenorton Feb 14 '11 at 13:00
    
Confirmed that this works on 9.0.8112.16421 (final release). The above take makes IE8 render in IE7 standards mode and IE9 renders in IE9 standards mode. Works with <!DOCTYPE HTML>. For IE7 quirks mode and IE9 standards mode, use <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7, IE=9">. –  Rich Apodaca Mar 19 '11 at 16:22
    
This seems to work also with IE=8,IE=10 –  RiverC Jun 27 '13 at 21:04
    
Also relevant: stackoverflow.com/questions/6156639/… - but beware that IE=edge has significant side effects upon IE11 –  robocat Oct 17 '13 at 4:23

I just noticed a page using:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="chrome=1"/>
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=edge"/>

so perhaps using two separate meta tags might also work:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7"/>
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=9"/>

I haven't tried it however, but if you find it works, add a comment to this and I will update the top answer. (Aside: I am using a separate comment, because even if it doesn't work, it may be a useful solution for other situations.)

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I see from msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/… that IE only respects the first X-UA-Compatible header if multiple are present. –  JohnGoldsmith Sep 17 '12 at 10:03

If you want IE 8 to use IE7 standards and IE 9 to use IE9 standards this one worked for me:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7, IE=9">

For IE9 this gives me IE 9 compatibility mode with IE 9 standards. For IE8 this gives me Browser Mode IE8 Document Mode IE7 Standards

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I have so far used all these, nothing works on IE9:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE8" >
<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=8" >

<httpProtocol>
        <customHeaders>
          <clear />
          <add name="X-UA-Compatible" value="IE=EmulateIE8" />
        </customHeaders>
    </httpProtocol>

this is so frustrating, none of these meta tags seems to be working. Microsoft, What is so difficult in supporting stuff you say should work in your documentation? we have to spend hours doing browser wars. You are wasting everyone's time.

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1  
Apparently on IE we cannot put conditional comments before the X-UA-Compatible. –  Deepfreezed May 25 '11 at 18:36

Wow Microsoft have really created a nightmare here. We're going to be talking about this well into the future!

Anyway this works for me.

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7; IE=EmulateIE9" />
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it doesn't work for me. Can you give your full source? –  Rich Apodaca Nov 12 '10 at 22:27
    
Change the semicolon to comma, should work. –  unclenorton Feb 14 '11 at 13:02
    
I changed IE=EmulateIE7; IE=IE9 to IE=EmulateIE7; IE=EmulateIE9 –  Alex Feb 15 '11 at 1:44

The dual mode mentioned by someone else should work (but doesn't as shown by Microsoft) and is the closest thing I've seen in MS documentation that should work as described. There's an update below that shows the proper form the meta attribute value should take.

So if you use this:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7; IE=EmulateIE9">

Unfortunately, what you will get is IE8 rendering as IE8 because of the fuzzy version vectoring that the x-ua-compatible engine does. See this document: Defining Document Compatibility: Understanding Content Attribute Values on MSDN. In that section, you'll see that in the first half, they define any version vector defined as larger than the current browser version will be interpreted as the largest available rendering engine. Therefore, emulateIE9 get's translated down to emulateIE8. Stupid.

Then, in the same breath practically, they talk about using multiple version vectors as in the code snippet above to exclude a particular engine. But because of the fuzzy version logic, that would never work. Ah, Microsoft. Fail again.

The reason why using CCs around the meta won't work, is that the browser must have chosen a rendering engine by the time it hits a CC. The x-ua meta must come before anything else in the header except other metas or the title according to MS's own documentation.

If anyone can figure this out, I'm all ears because I'm desperate to exclude IE8 from support while including IE9.

IMPORTANT UPDATE:

Robocat points out, using a comma instead of a semi-colon as Micrsoft shows is the correct way of doing this. I tested it and it worked for me. I've updated my test page.

So the correct form is this (as suggested by robocat):

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7, IE=9">

The incorrect form is this (as suggested by Microsoft):

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=7; IE=9">
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thanks for this informative answer. I wish it had the solution, but at least the problem is clearer now. –  Rich Apodaca Nov 12 '10 at 22:26
    
After extensive round and round on testing this, it looks like it does indeed work if emulate is used. At issue is if during testing you've fiddled with any of IE8's Devloper Tools settings for the page. This is what has led to my long-time confusion. But if I do a fresh load of the test page in a brand new tab, it always loads as expected in IE8 (i.e., as IE7). Also, it's important that the values "IE=EmulateIE7; IE=EmulateIE9" are used instead of "IE=7; IE=9" because otherwise IE8 will render as IE8 there. –  squareman Nov 29 '10 at 18:42
    
Hoo boy. Sorry. One more flip flop and I think this if final. Using multiple values DOES NOT WORK. Sorry, Microsoft, you have failed again. Please see this page: emological.com/ie for the full notes. –  squareman Nov 29 '10 at 20:31
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SUCCESS! Thanks to robocat. YES! Using a comma instead of a semicolon seems to work. I've updated my index page to reflect that. stackoverflow.com/questions/3413629/… –  squareman Jan 5 '11 at 23:24
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Confirmed that this works on 9.0.8112.16421 (final release). For quirks mode IE7, use: <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7, IE=9"> –  Rich Apodaca Mar 19 '11 at 16:23

I think what you need is:

<meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7; IE=EmulateIE9">

according to http://blogs.msdn.com/b/ie/archive/2010/06/16/ie-s-compatibility-features-for-site-developers.aspx as it states this as "... an example that combines values so that IE8 renders a webpage in IE7 Standards mode while IE9 renders the webpage in IE9’s Standards mode:"

However I for one can't get this to work.

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this doesn't work for me. –  Rich Apodaca Nov 12 '10 at 22:25
<!--[if IE 8]>
  <meta http-equiv="X-UA-Compatible" content="IE=EmulateIE7" />
<![endif]-->

It's called conditional comments
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Conditional_comment

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Does not work. IE8 stays in IE8-mode. I seems like the rendering mode is picked before the conditional comments kick in. –  Urjan Aug 5 '10 at 10:24
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Indeed, any use of a conditional comment fixes the documentMode so it cannot be changed by a later <meta>. –  bobince Aug 5 '10 at 10:33
    
Sorry, I didnt test it. –  Sruly Aug 5 '10 at 16:49
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Any conditional comment in <head> causes emulate modes to not work. –  Rich Apodaca Nov 12 '10 at 22:28
2  
@bobince is right. Logic here is obvious -- the browser should already know what it behaves like before the conditional comments can be processed. –  unclenorton Feb 14 '11 at 13:04

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