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I am trying to set a value from a method of a class and trying to get it in another method. The example code is as below. I think the below kind of set/get works in a Java class. Googled out but still could not find a relevant solution.

I searched for "how to share data across functions in PHP" and found php call member variables off a class within static method, but that did not answer my question.

<?php
class MyClass
{
    public $cons;

    function showConstant() {
        $this->setConstant(100); /* assign value to variable here */
        $this->showConstantGetter();
    }

    /* setter */
    function setConstant($aCons) {
        $cons  = $aCons;
    }

    /* getter */
    function getConstant() {
        return $cons;
    }


    function showConstantGetter() {
        echo "<br>getting const : ".$this->getConstant(); /* use the variable's value in this method here */
    }

}

$classname = "MyClass";
$class = new MyClass();
$class->showConstant();

?>
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5 Answers 5

You must use $this->cons instead of $cons, that's all.

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+1, sad but true. every time that i go back to code some PHP i forget this... not so intuitive ;) –  Zied Aug 5 '10 at 11:31
1  
Yes, it's very intuitive. That's how objects work. Every language with dynamic object variables requires you to qualify access. Only compiled languages like C++ and Java let you access members without qualifying, but then you might accidentaly "shadow" a member variable. Excplicitly accessing the object is the only way to be unambigous. –  gnud Aug 5 '10 at 12:02
    
"intuitive" is only a matter of habit. If you programed C++ your whole life and now start using PHP it isn't intuitive obviously. –  NikiC Aug 5 '10 at 12:03
    
Oops sorry, I do not get the values still: /* setter / function setConstant($aCons) { $this->cons = $aCons; } / getter */ function getConstant() { $this->cons; } –  oneworld Aug 5 '10 at 12:05
    
You forgot the echo in the getConstant –  Xeross Aug 5 '10 at 12:26

Nearly good but:

function setConstant($aCons) {
        $this->cons  = $aCons;
    }

    /* getter */
    function getConstant() {
        return $this->cons;
    }
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To access instance variables in PHP, you need to prefix them with $this->.

In your example:

    function getConstant() {
        return $this->cons;
    }

To access a class (or static) variable, you use self:: instead of $this->.

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Class variables are $this->var; Static variables are self::$var; –  Treffynnon Aug 5 '10 at 11:32
    
@Treff "class variable" means "static variable" –  Artefacto Aug 5 '10 at 11:47
    
@Artefacto never heard of that terminology solely referring to static class properties. php.net/manual/en/language.oop5.properties.php –  Treffynnon Aug 5 '10 at 11:58
    
@Treff See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Field_(computer_science%29 –  Artefacto Aug 5 '10 at 12:17

Note that it is this:

$this->cons = $aCons;

and not this:

$this->$cons = $aCons;

If you specify $this->$cons, PHP will first look at the value in $cons and uses that as the name of the instance variable. In your case, there is nothing in $cons yet, so it will find a name that is empty, which causes the error message.

This type of indirection is not what you want to do here, so don't put the dollar sign in there twice!

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Hi Thanks for the answers. That was a very quick resolution. Appreciate it very much. Thanks everyone and all. Here is the complete code which works:

<?php
class MyClass
{
    var $cons;

    function showConstant() {
        $this->setConstant(100); /* assign value to variable here */
        $this->showConstantGetter();
    }

    /* setter */
    function setConstant($aCons) {
        $this->cons  = $aCons;
    }

    /* getter */
    function getConstant() {
        return $this->cons;
    }


    function showConstantGetter() {
        echo "<br>getting const : ".$this->getConstant(); /* use the variable's value in this method here */
    }

}

$classname = "MyClass";
$class = new MyClass();
$class->showConstant();

?>
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