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I'm trying to put two divs on the right side of parent div one above another. Something like this:

 div#top 
|-------------------------------------||------------|
|div#parent                           ||div#menu    |
|                          |---------|||float:right |
|                          |div#up   |||            |
|                          |         |||            |
|                          |---------|||------------|
|                                     |
|                          |---------||
|                          |div#down ||
|                          |         ||
|                          |---------||
|-------------------------------------|

Any ideas how to do it using css? I can't use tables here because div#up is added in Master page (ASP.NET) and div#down is added in content. Div#parent is liquid with some min-width set and contains content that should not be overlapped by these divs so i think position:absolute is out of question here too.

One more detail: on the left and right of div#parent there ale divs floated left and right with menus. So adding clear:left/right to div#down floated right puts it under one of these menus...

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3 Answers 3

up vote 7 down vote accepted

You need to make sure that the parent block (#parent in your case) becomes the containing block block formatting context of the divs #up and #down, so that any clearing only happens inside that containing block block formatting context and ignores the floats outside of it. The easiest way to do this usually is to either let #parent float, too, or give it an overflow other than visible.

http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visudet.html#containing-block-details http://www.w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#block-formatting

Here some proof, that I got it right this time: http://jsfiddle.net/Pagqx/

Sorry for the confusion.

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It's the first time I hear of "clearing only happening inside containing block" and spec (your link) says nothing about it. Is that a behavior that is actually implemented in browsers? –  buti-oxa Aug 5 '10 at 19:37
    
Unfortunately that doesn't seem to work. Divs fall down under the menus. –  Episodex Aug 6 '10 at 7:24
    
@buti-oxa: Here: w3.org/TR/CSS2/visuren.html#propdef-clear Quote. "The 'clear' property does not consider floats inside the element itself or in other block formatting contexts." –  RoToRa Aug 6 '10 at 8:29
1  
Hmm, sorry, my error. I confused "containing block" and "block formatting context". I'll change my answer... –  RoToRa Aug 6 '10 at 8:41
    
Works like a charm! Thank you. –  Episodex Aug 6 '10 at 9:19

You need to use both float:right and clear:right, which ensures that the right-hand side of the element is unobstructed to the edge of the containing element.

<div id="parent" style="width: 80%">

    <div id="up"   style="float: right; clear: both;">div with id 'up'</div>
    <div id="down" style="float: right; clear: both;">div with id 'down'</div>
    'parent' div

</div>
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That is almost working, but as I wrote I have floated menus to the left and right and using clear causes my divs to go under them. Is there any way to prevent this behavior? –  Episodex Aug 6 '10 at 7:22
1  
You probably just need to change the CSS to only use clear: right; –  a'r Aug 6 '10 at 8:27
    
This gets my vote for the simplest correct answer. –  Pete Gardner Jul 23 at 15:37

Personally I would wrap them in a container div, and give it a width and float it right.

#sidebar{
  width: 250px;
  float: right;
}
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He cannot add another div around those two as they are added by different components of the system. That's why a table solution is out of question for him. –  buti-oxa Aug 5 '10 at 19:33

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