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function first() {
    foreach($list as $item ) {
        ${'variable_' . $item->ID} = $item->title;
        // gives $varible_10 = 'some text'; (10 can be replaced with any number)
    }
    $ordinary_variable = 'something';
}

How to get values of this function inside an another function?

Like:

function second() {
    foreach($list as $item ) {
        get ${'variable_' . $item->ID};
        // getting identical value from first() function
    }
    get $ordinary_variable;
}
  • We know that $variable_id (id is numeric) already exists in first()
  • $list is an Array(), which can have more than 100 values.
  • $ordinary_variable is a string.

Thanks.

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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

You could let the first function return an array:

function first() {
    $values = array();
    foreach($list as $item ) {
        $values['variable_' . $item->ID] = $item->title;
        // gives $varible_10 = 'some text'; (10 can be replaced with any number)
    }
    $values['ordinary_variable'] = 'something';
    return $values;
}

and then:

function second() {
    $values = first();
    foreach($list as $item ) {
        $values['variable_' . $item->ID];
        // getting identical value from first() function
    }
    $values['ordinary_variable'];
}

or pass it as parameter:

second(first());

I would advice against global as this introduces side-effects and makes the code harder to maintain/debug.

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${'variable_' . $item->ID} is out of scope. Perhaps you should create a global array and store them there.

simplified example

$myvars = array();

function first() {
  global $myvars;
  ...
  $myvars['variable_' . $item->ID] = $item->title;
}

function second() {
  global $myvars;
  ...
  echo $myvars['variable_' . $item->ID];
}
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Global is bad and unnecessary. Argument lists exist for a reason. –  KevinM1 Aug 5 '10 at 14:37
1  
It may be unnecessary, but it's not necessarily bad. No context was provided for the interplay between the two functions. –  Fosco Aug 5 '10 at 14:40
    
Global obfuscates the interaction between what a function does and what it needs to actually do its job. It leads to debugging, maintenance, and extensibility issues. A function's interface needs to be truthful. –  KevinM1 Aug 5 '10 at 14:44
    
Oh please. Just because you've never encountered that situation (yet) doesn't mean that ignoring best practices is a good idea. They're considered best practices for a reason. Yes, sometimes best practices are an idealized goal that shouldn't get in the way of development. 'Global' is not one of those as it doesn't offer anything that passing a variable through an argument list cannot also do. Your code example, for instance, would work just as well by passing the array in by reference. Further, doing that would make it clear to whomever invokes the function that the array is necessary –  KevinM1 Aug 5 '10 at 15:03
    
Last comment: goto-like structures are also included in most languages, even modern ones. I don't think anyone would say using them is good, or that if one is tempted to use one it's likely a sign of bad design. The only global-like structure I've ever used is a Singleton. And only after careful consideration and care in its use. –  KevinM1 Aug 5 '10 at 15:51
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