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i have two collections of the same objects (same size list of course). items can be matched by an IEqualityComparer (matching on a unique property of the object).

I want to generate a new list out of these existing lists that just show the field differences of each of the "same" items from each collection. I was thinking of doing something like this

List<ObjectFieldDiff> list = CalcList(origList1, origList2);

where

public class ObjectFieldDiffs
{
        public List<FieldDiff> FieldDiffs; 
}

public class FieldDiff
{
      public string PropertyName;
      public string Object1Value;
      public string Object2Value;
}

does this make sense. any suggestions?

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" that just show the field differences of each of the "same" items from each collection" - could you make that clearer? –  Mitch Wheat Aug 5 '10 at 14:35
    
I'm reading it to mean that he has objects with the same unique identifier but other fields different. For example, perhaps two lists of orders which he wants to match on the order number and see what other fields are different. –  dsolimano Aug 5 '10 at 14:39
    
if i have two car objects with the same ID but one has a Color of Red and one has a Color of Blue, then i want to create a ObjectFieldDiffs objects with one items in the FieldDiffs collection showing the "Red" versus "blue" –  leora Aug 5 '10 at 14:39
    
Are the two lists in the same order? –  dtb Aug 5 '10 at 14:40
1  
Create a method that will compare the properties of the 2 objects in your lists and return the differences - either via reflection or statically if you know the type. Then it is just a simple matter of iterating over the lists and comparing the objects. Also load the lists to a dictionary (key will be the UID) so you can directly compare. –  Jaroslav Jandek Aug 5 '10 at 14:42

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

That seems reasonable, perhaps I would just add links to the two objects in question.

public class FieldDiff
{
  public object Object1;
  public object Object2;
  public string PropertyName;
  public object Object1Value;
  public object Object2Value;
}

Alternatively, if all of the properties are numeric, you could just store a difference:

public class FieldDiff
{
  public object Object1;
  public object Object2;
  public string PropertyName;
  public object ValueDifference;
}
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(OK, I think this is going to be too long for a comment)

What do you mean by "Field Differences" and "'same' items" ?

class Point { public int X; public int Y;}

Point[] origList1 = new Point[1] {new Point() {X = 5, Y = 10}};
Point[] origList2 = new Point[1] {new Point() {X = 5, Y = 11}};

List<ObjectFieldDiff> list = CalcList(origList1, origList2); 

What exactly do you expect in list ?

From what I can gleen from you question, it would be:

new List<FieldDiff>(1) {new FieldDiff() {ValueObject1=10, ValueObject2=11}};

which is of minimal use (no idea which objects mismatch, no idea which field in the object mismatch)

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the only addition is that there is a property on FieldDiff which would have "Y" in it to show the name of the different property –  leora Aug 5 '10 at 14:52

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