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I am on a weird kick of seeing how few lines I can make my code. Is there a way to condense this to inline case statements?

    switch (FIZZBUZZ)
    {
      case "Fizz":
        {
          //Do one process
          break;
        }
      case "Buzz":
        {
          //Do one process
          break;
        }
      case "FizzBuzz":
        {
          //Do one process
          break;
        }
    }

to look something like this:

    switch (FIZZBUZZ)
    {
      case "Fizz": //Do one process
      case "Buzz": //Do one process
      case "FizzBuzz": //Do one process
    }
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4  
Get off that kick, some things can be done nicely as such, but generally you'll just start writing less and less readable code.. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 5 '10 at 15:00

9 Answers 9

up vote 8 down vote accepted

If you want to condense things you could just put things on one line (let's imagine that "do one process is a call to Console.WriteLine):

switch (FIZZBUZZ)
{
    case "Fizz": Console.WriteLine("Fizz"); break;
    case "Buzz": Console.WriteLine("Buzz"); break;
    case "FizzBuzz": Console.WriteLine("FizzBuzz"); break;
}

If you want to get fancy you could create a map of strings to actions like this:

var map = new Dictionary<String, Action>
{
    { "Fizz", () => Console.WriteLine("Fizz") },
    { "Buzz", () => Console.WriteLine("Fizz") },
    { "FizzBuzz", () => Console.WriteLine("FizzBuzz") }
};

And then you could invoke the method like this:

map[FIZZBUZZ].Invoke(); // or this: map[FIZZBUZZ]();
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Well but I have "handleFizz" and "handleBuzz" for the two calls. and then call them both for fizzbuzz. I would be repeating code this way. As much as I like to condense, I like efficiency. :) –  Jim Aug 5 '10 at 15:03
    
@Jim - I like correctness, readability, and maintainability. I am glad that in the fizzbuzz example at least, our interests may coincide. :-) –  Jeffrey L Whitledge Aug 5 '10 at 15:09

FYI, if anyone was looking for a inline shorthand switch case statement to return a value, I found the best solution for me was to do a nested loop like so:

string Season = "Spring";
Season = Season == "Fall" ? "Spring" : Season == "Spring" ? "Summer" : "Fall";

You can optionally make it more readable while still inline by wrapping it in params:

var PeriodName = Season = (Season == "Fall" ? "Spring" : (Season == "Spring" ? "Summer" : "Fall"));

So, to serve as a code execution block you could write:

string FizzBuzz = "Fizz";
FizzBuzz = FizzBuzz == "Fizz" ? MethodThatReturnsAString("Fizz") : (FizzBuzz == "Buzz" ? MethodThatReturnsAString("Buzz") : MethodThatReturnsAString("FizzBuzz"));

Not the most respectable solution for a long list of case elements, but you are trying to do an inline switch statement ;)

Critiques from the community?

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With the assumption that this is purely esoteric and that you will not be tempted to use this in a production system, you could abuse expression trees:

FIZZBUZZ.Switch(Fizz => DoSomething(),
                Buzz => DoSomethingElse(),
                FizzBuzz => DoSomethingElseStill());

Where Switch is an extension method:

public static void Switch(this string @this, params Expression<Action>[] cases)
{
    Expression<Action> matchingAction = cases.SingleOrDefault(@case => @case.Parameters[0].Name == @this);
    if (matchingAction == null) return; // no matching action

    matchingAction.Compile()();
}
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I like it! interesting way of doing things. –  Jeremy Holovacs Aug 7 '12 at 15:42

You don't need the curly braces for the case statements, but do you need a break statement for each case. Otherwise, you can't really do much

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You can put as much code on one line as you like with C#.

As Andrew says.

Personally my preference is to leave white space as it allows easier reading of the code but then again I am the only dev here who comments his code or writes methods and functions small enough to be able to quickly scan the code to see exactly what it does. :)

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I don't know of any way to do this other than the obvious:

switch (FIZZBUZZ) 
    { 
      case "Fizz": { //Do one process } break;
      case "Buzz": { //Do one process  } break;
      case "FizzBuzz": { //Do one process  } break;
    }
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Well if you're really interested in fewest lines of code you can write:

switch (FIZZBUZZ) { case "Fizz": /* Do one process */ break; case "Buzz": /* Do one process */ break; case "FizzBuzz": /* Do one process */ break; }

I wouldn't recommend it though.

It's hard to tell exactly what you're asking though - are you trying to fall through between cases, or just remove braces?

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1  
I actually did that to a coworker who irritated me once. Wrote an entire class on a single line. –  Joel Etherton Aug 5 '10 at 14:55
    
I am trying to remove braces. –  Jim Aug 5 '10 at 14:55
    
@Jim: other than the braces around the switch block itself, you don't need the other braces, so just remove them. Though if you're creating variables in any of those cases, it is suggested to have them to ensure scope safety. –  Jimmy Hoffa Aug 5 '10 at 15:02

Well an easy way would be:

switch (FIZZBUZZ)
{
     case "Fizz": Console.WriteLine("Fizz"); break;
     case "Buzz": Console.WriteLine("Buzz"); break;
     case "FizzBuzz": Console.WriteLine("FizzBuzz"); break;
}

Which is only one line each. But there's multiple statements per line...

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You always have to have a break statement in order to leave the switch other than that you can do it as you mention

  switch (FIZZBUZZ)
    {
      case "Fizz": /*Do one process*/break;
      case "Buzz": /*Do one process*/break;
      case "FizzBuzz": /*Do one process*/break;
    }
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Beat me to it! :) –  Paul Hadfield Aug 5 '10 at 14:54

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