Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm looking for bad examples of using inheritance. I'm not very creative so this was the best I could think of:

class Car : public Engine {}

A car has an engine, but it is not an engine.

This would probably work to explain the concept, but I believe there are more illustrative examples?

share|improve this question
    
I think there are infinitely many wrong things you could do. Also, SO is not intended for poll questions. –  danben Aug 5 '10 at 15:39
1  
I think this is a good question, because it can help newbies avoid silly OOP mistakes. –  Hippo Aug 5 '10 at 16:03
add comment

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

The "classic" example ;-):

public class Stack extends Vector { 
    ...
}

A Stack is NOT a Vector.

If Stack extends Vector, you are able to insert/delete at every given index, whereas you should only be allowed to add/delete elements by pushing/popping.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Use pretty much any example that uses inheritance without regard to the behavior of the base class.

A classic example is the relationship between Square and Rectangle. Sure, in mathematics, a square is a type of a rectangle. However, in software design, a square doesn't behave like a rectangle:

public class Rectangle 
{
    public virtual int Width  { get; set; }
    public virtual int Height { get; set; }
}

public class Square : Rectangle
{
    public override int Width
    {
        get { return base.Width; }
        set
        {
            base.Width = value;
            base.Height = value;
        }
    }

    public override int Height
    {
        get { return base.Height; }
        set
        {
            base.Height= value;
            base.Width = value;
        }
    }
}

If another class, Client, needs a Rectangle but gets a Square, Client will break because it expects its Rectangle to have a Width and Height that don't affect each other.

share|improve this answer
3  
This only breaks down because Rectangle is mutable. –  Lee Aug 5 '10 at 16:02
    
I agree with Lee -- in the abstract sense a Square is a Rectangle, it's only your particular implementation that makes it invalid. –  Gabe Sep 8 '10 at 18:26
    
Jeff: You could just change the contract so that the client doesn't expect the Width and Height to have no effect on each other. –  Gabe Sep 9 '10 at 1:05
    
I agree with Lee, too. This is just an example that I've seen in a few OOP books. In every case, the author leaves immutability out of the example. (Sorry for the late response.) –  Jeff Mattfield Sep 9 '10 at 2:06
add comment

Inheritance is very useful, but also breaks encapsulation. This means that your subclasses depend on implementation details of the superclass; if the superclass changes, your subclass may break. Here's an example in Java, from Effective Java by Josh Bloch:

public class InstrumentedHashSet<E> extends HashSet<E> {

   // number of attempted element insertions
   private int addCount = 0;

   public int getAddCount() {
      return addCount;
   }

   @Override public boolean addAll<Collection<? extends E> c) {
       addCount += c.size();
       return super.addAll(c);
   }
}

The problem is that HashSet's addAll() method uses its add() method internally, but doesn't document this. So if you try

InstrumentedHashSet<String> s = new InstrumentedHashSet<String>();
s.addAll(Arrays.asList("Snap", "Crackle", "Pop"));

you end up with a count of 6 instead of 3. In this particular case that isn't very harmful, but if you were adding a large collection or doing some other operation, it could be.

So, concrete classes are usually not a good idea to inherit from, unless they were designed to have subclasses.

share|improve this answer
add comment

This have been debated for years, and you'll find a lot of materials/talks referencing the problem on google.

public class Square extends Rectangle { 
    ...
}

Perhaps not very surprising though, a square should not inherit from a rectangle.

share|improve this answer
    
I did not find good example on google, that's why I'm asking. –  mafu Aug 5 '10 at 22:32
    
@mafutrct The particular problem here, I mean. google.com/… –  nos Aug 5 '10 at 22:54
1  
I have yet to see a square that wasn't a rectangle. Can you draw me one? –  Gabe Sep 8 '10 at 18:27
    
@Gabe In the real world, sure. In OO, no. The simple explanation for the troubles you'll get is here cafe.elharo.com/programming/a-square-is-not-a-rectangle –  nos Sep 8 '10 at 20:43
    
nos: Why does OO have to not model the real world? In the real world, changing the size of a rectangle gives you a different rectangle. Just make your implementation not let you change the size of an existing Rectangle. Or change your contract so that the client knows that there could be size or aspect ratio restrictions. –  Gabe Sep 9 '10 at 0:59
show 5 more comments

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.