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Is it possible to have guards on lambda functions?

For example:

\k
    | k < 0     -> "negative"
    | k == 0    -> "zero"
    | otherwise -> "positive"
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3 Answers 3

up vote 24 down vote accepted

Nope. The nearest direct translation is something a bit like

\k -> case () of
       _ | k < 0     -> "negative"
         | k == 0    -> "zero"
         | otherwise -> "positive"
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Never thought of using _ over () :D –  Thomas Eding Aug 5 '10 at 16:51
2  
You can use it over anything, of course, but () is short and probably least confusing. –  Ganesh Sittampalam Aug 5 '10 at 19:37
1  
You could also consider the select function haskell.org/haskellwiki/Case#Using_functions –  singpolyma Dec 10 '12 at 13:59

As of GHC 7.6.1 there is an extension called MultiWayIf that lets you write the following:

\k -> if
  | k < 0     -> "negative"
  | k == 0    -> "zero"
  | otherwise -> "positive"

Which at the very least is more pleasant to look at than the alternative using case.

For pattern-matching, there is a related extension called LambdaCase:

\case
  "negative" -> -1
  "zero"     -> 0
  "positive" -> 1
  _          -> error "invalid sign"
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I like to keep lambdas short and sweet so as not to break the reader's visual flow. For a function whose definition is syntactically bulky enough to warrant guards, why not stick it in a where clause?

showSign k = mysign ++ " (" ++ show k ++ ")"
  where
  mysign
    | k < 0     = "negative"
    | k == 0    = "zero"
    | otherwise = "positive"
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