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Mod of negative number is melting my brain!

I was wondering if there was a nicer algorithm for what I'm trying to do:

wrapIndex(-6, 3) = 0
wrapIndex(-5, 3) = 1
wrapIndex(-4, 3) = 2
wrapIndex(-3, 3) = 0
wrapIndex(-2, 3) = 1
wrapIndex(-1, 3) = 2
wrapIndex(0, 3) = 0
wrapIndex(1, 3) = 1
wrapIndex(2, 3) = 2
wrapIndex(3, 3) = 0
wrapIndex(4, 3) = 1
wrapIndex(5, 3) = 2

I came up with

function wrapIndex(i, i_max) {
        if(i > -1)
            return i%i_max;

        var x = i_max + i%i_max;
        if(x == i_max)
            return 0;

        return x;
    }

Is there a nicer way to do this?

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marked as duplicate by ShreevatsaR, sdcvvc, polygenelubricants, David Thornley, Moron Aug 5 '10 at 18:01

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
Which language? –  KennyTM Aug 5 '10 at 17:03
    
Duplicate of [Mod of negative number is melting my brain! ](stackoverflow.com/questions/1082917/…) and of at least a dozen questions on this website. :-) –  ShreevatsaR Aug 5 '10 at 17:41
    
Well, I searched for modulo of negative numbers and didn't really find anything... Sorry for another duplicate. –  x3ro Aug 5 '10 at 19:58
    
int mod(int k, int n) { return ((k %= n) < 0) ? k+n : k; } –  Evgeni Sergeev Apr 22 at 8:42
    
And in Python (k % n) is always positive if n is positive. –  Evgeni Sergeev Apr 22 at 8:44

5 Answers 5

up vote 17 down vote accepted

This solution is branchless, but performs % twice:

function wrapIndex(i, i_max) {
   return ((i % i_max) + i_max) % i_max;
}

It should be said the C#/Java behavior of % is assumed, i.e. the result has the same sign as the dividend. Some languages define the remainder calculation to take the sign of the divisor instead (e.g. mod in Clojure). Some languages have both variants (mod/rem pair in Common Lisp, Haskell, etc). Algol-68 has %x which always returns a non-negative number. C++ leaves it up to implementation.

See also

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1  
+1 because it actually works. ;-) –  Paul Sasik Aug 5 '10 at 17:15
1  
Version with a branch returns i_max for negative multiple of i_max –  Maciej Hehl Aug 5 '10 at 17:39
    
@Maciej: You're right; taking it out completely (since I'm not a fan of it anyway; was just trying to be "complete"). –  polygenelubricants Aug 5 '10 at 17:45

The solution with two % operations works, but this is somewhat faster in most languages on most hardware (there are exceptions, however):

int wrapIndex(int i, int i_max) {
    i = i%i_max;
    return i<0 ? i+i_max : i;
}
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Nicer is a matter of taste, but How about

var x = (i_max + i % i_max) % i_max;
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I really feel uncomfortable upvoting this, since I don't know the exact operation precedence rules for Java, or whatever language this question is asked for, but I'm sure you know what you're doing (thanks for the correction, I see that at least 3 people including me has made that error here already) –  polygenelubricants Aug 5 '10 at 17:55
1  
@polygenelubricants: % has precedence over + in essentially all modern languages. –  Stephen Canon Aug 5 '10 at 18:28

You could do this:

function wrapIndex(i, i_max) {
    if (i < 0) i = (i % i_max) + i_max;
    return i % i_max;
}
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1  
Previous version was correct :) (i % i_max) + i_max may be equal i_max if (i % i_max) == 0 –  Maciej Hehl Aug 5 '10 at 17:10
1  
@Maciej Hehl: Dammit, you’re right. –  Gumbo Aug 5 '10 at 17:13

Many users gave good answers, just beware negative numbers, since different languages may behave differently. By example this C snippet writes "-1"

int main ()
{
    printf("%d\n", (-4) % 3);
}

While in python we have a different output value

Python 2.6.4 (r264:75706, Dec  7 2009, 18:43:55) 
[GCC 4.4.1] on linux2
Type "help", "copyright", "credits" or "license" for more information.
>>> (-4) % 3
2

EDIT: Actually I don't think you'll have negative indexes! However it's good to know that.

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