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I want to warn the user if their commit message doesn't follow a certain set of guidelines, and then give them the option to edit their commit message, ignore the warning, or cancel the commit. The problem is that I don't seem to have access to stdin.

Below is my commit-msg file:

function verify_info {
    if [ -z "$(grep '$2:.*[a-zA-Z]' $1)" ]
    then
        echo >&2 $2 information should not be omitted
        local_editor=`git config --get core.editor`
        if [ -z "${local_editor}" ]
        then
            local_editor=${EDITOR}
        fi
        echo "Do you want to"
        select CHOICE in "edit the commit message" "ignore this warning" "cancel the commit"; do
            case ${CHOICE} in
                i*) echo "Warning ignored"
                    ;;
                e*) ${local_editor} $1
                    verify_info "$1" $2
                    ;;
                *)  echo "CHOICE = ${CHOICE}"
                    exit 1
                    ;;
            esac
        done
    fi
}

verify_info "$1" "Scope"
if [ $# -ne 0 ];
then
    exit $#
fi
verify_info "$1" "Affects"
if [ $# -ne 0 ];
then
    exit $#
fi

exit 0

Here is the output when I leave the Scope information blank:

Scope information should not be omitted
Do you want to:
1) edit the commit message  3) cancel the commit
2) ignore this warning
#?

The message is correct, but it doesn't actually stop for input. I've also tried using the simpler "read" command, and it has the same problem. It seems that the problem is that at this point git has control of stdin and is providing its own input. How do I fix this?

Update: It seems this might be a duplicate of this question which unfortunately seems to suggest I'm out of luck.

share|improve this question
    
When you have access to a X Server you can escape to a graphical dialog tool. Ugly-but-works –  Rudi Aug 6 '10 at 11:24
    
Instead of the error message you could simply provide an informative error message -- including echoing the necessary command to ignore the warning. –  bstpierre Aug 10 '10 at 0:45
    
@btspierre, that's the approach I ended up taking. At the advice of John Feminella, I allowed the use of a environment variable to override the warning, and just echo the warning whenever a bad situation is encountered. –  Ben Hocking Aug 10 '10 at 18:56
    
@Rudi: I'm not sure what you'd escape to the X Server, as git seems to have complete control of stdin. –  Ben Hocking Aug 10 '10 at 18:57
    
I mean when you have a graphical user interface running you can "escape" from the terminal by running a graphical dialog box(like xdialog or kdialog), which is not bound to any tty. See techbase.kde.org/Development/Tutorials/… or or xdialog.free.fr for further details. –  Rudi Aug 13 '10 at 7:00
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3 Answers

up vote 28 down vote accepted

Calling exec < /dev/tty assigns standard input to the keyboard. Works for me in a post-commit git hook:

#!/bin/sh

echo "[post-commit hook] Commit done!"

# Allows us to read user input below, assigns stdin to keyboard
exec < /dev/tty

while true; do
  read -p "[post-commit hook] Check for outdated gems? (Y/n) " yn
  if [ "$yn" = "" ]; then
    yn='Y'
  fi
  case $yn in
      [Yy] ) bundle outdated --pre; break;;
      [Nn] ) exit;;
      * ) echo "Please answer y or n for yes or no.";;
  esac
done
share|improve this answer
4  
STDIN can be closed again with exec <&- –  Andy Jan 24 '13 at 10:57
5  
If you're using Ruby, that'd translate to STDIN.reopen('/dev/tty'). Awesome stuff, this is the real answer. –  Matthew Scharley Jun 14 '13 at 9:39
    
This is awesome, but it may break when committing from another tool, such as an editor. Not sure how to get around that, but if someone has an idea, I'd be interested to hear. –  Peeja Sep 17 '13 at 14:44
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To make select stop for input, you may also try to redirect the stdin of select from /dev/fd/3 (See: Read input in bash inside a while loop).

# sample code using a while loop to simulate git consuming stdin
{ 
echo 'fd 0' | while read -r stdin; do
   echo "stdin: $stdin"
   echo "Do you want to"
   select CHOICE in "edit the commit message" "ignore this warning" "cancel the commit"; do
      case ${CHOICE} in
         i*) echo "Warning ignored"
             ;;
         e*) echo ${local_editor} $1
             echo verify_info "$1" $2
             ;;
         *)  echo "CHOICE = ${CHOICE}"
             exit 1
             ;;
      esac
   done 0<&3 3<&-
done
} 3<&- 3<&0
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The commit-msg hook is not run in an interactive environment (as you have noticed).

The only way to reliable notify the user would be to write an error to stdout, place a copy of the commit message in a 'BAD_MSG' file and instruct the user to edit the file and 'git commit --file=BAD_MSG'


If you have some control over the environment you could have an alternate editor which is a wrapper script that checks the proposed message, and can restart the editor with an extra commented message.

Basically, you run the editor, check the file saved against your rules. and if it fails, prepend your warning message (with leading #) to the file and restart the editor.

You could even allow them to put in a '#FORCE=true' line in the message which would suppress the check and continue.

share|improve this answer
3  
Try calling exec < /dev/tty first in the script to be able to capture user input - see other answer. –  Eliot Sykes Apr 4 '12 at 16:50
    
Although this is a well thought out answer, Eliot's should be accepted as he proves it is actually possible! –  Matt Fletcher Sep 6 '13 at 10:29
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