Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I ran into a Java StackOverflow error, but the offending recursive call is so deep, that it does not give me the full stack trace. It only dumps out the first 1024 lines of methods of the StackOverflow exception.

How can I get the full stack trace, so that I can know the root cause?

share|improve this question
2  
Not an answer, but consider also debugging with breakpoints, logging, etc. –  polygenelubricants Aug 5 '10 at 18:58
1  
The root cause is in the first lines, the rest should look the same. Could you try to post the stacktrace to have a look at it? ( probably in pastebin.com or something like that? ) –  OscarRyz Aug 5 '10 at 19:00
    
Are you using recursion by any chance? If so, this helps blogs.msdn.com/b/oldnewthing/archive/2009/01/07/9286576.aspx . See the related discussion on SO: stackoverflow.com/questions/951635/… –  Vineet Reynolds Aug 5 '10 at 19:01
    
I would bet this is impossible. It might very well be so that the jvm intentionally has a limit on the number of stack frames to reify on exceptions. Otherwise the time complexity for throwing exceptions would be linear in the number of stack frames. –  Tarrasch Apr 27 at 15:24

4 Answers 4

Instead of doing a e.printStackTrace(), how about catching the exception and looping on the cause to find the original exception:

    try {
        doSomething();
    } catch (Exception _e) {
        Throwable ex = _e;
        while (ex.getCause()!=null) {
            ex = ex.getCause();
        }
        ex.printStackTrace();
    }

Warning: some exception returns themselves as the cause, causing an infinite loop in the code above.

share|improve this answer
1  
I wouldn't expect a StackOverflowError to ever have a non-null cause. It's caused by the stack overflowing, not by another exception. –  Chris Jones May 31 '11 at 16:31
1  
My code tries to loop until the parent exception is reached. "Parent" exception does not have a cause. –  Thierry-Dimitri Roy May 31 '11 at 16:36
    
How did this answer which doesn't work get 3 votes? –  Pacerier Feb 11 '12 at 20:26

You can use -Xss to change the stack size, but it won't help if you have unbounded recursion. It sounds like your stopping condition might not be worked out.

share|improve this answer
5  
If anything, lower the stack size so the exception happens sooner and the stacktrace fits within the lines allowed! :-) –  Mark Peters Aug 5 '10 at 19:23

The root cause is probably recursion, look for the usages of the method producing the stack overflow.

share|improve this answer

Print the stack manually, the limit put on e.printStackTrace() does not apply when you provide a writer (might need to quote me on that but I've never experienced it being cropped when using this method).

Here is some easy code that I employ to get full traces:

/**
 * Produces a Java-like stack trace string.
 * 
 * @param e
 * @return
 */
public static String exceptionStack(Throwable e) {
    final Writer result = new StringWriter();
    final PrintWriter printWriter = new PrintWriter(result);
    e.printStackTrace(printWriter);
    return result.toString();
}
share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't work. I have only 1024 lines, it doesn't show the root cause. –  Pacerier Feb 11 '12 at 21:06

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.