Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

Is there a better way to get all distinct values from three columns in one table other than using the DISTINCT function? I've also tried GROUP BY, but there doesn't seem to be any noticeable difference in the cost.

SELECT DISTINCT Table1.Col1, Table2.Col1, Table1.Col3
FROM Table1 
INNER JOIN Table2 ON Table1.FK = Table2.ID
WHERE Table1.Foo = 1865 AND Table2.Type = 1
share|improve this question
2  
There is no Table3 in your FROM clause. –  RedFilter Aug 5 '10 at 20:09
    
What's the scenario here? Why are you DISTINCTing the data? –  Mark Canlas Aug 5 '10 at 20:09
    
Related question, why do you not want to distinct the data? Is there a reason why DISTINCT isn't available here? –  Justin Morgan Aug 5 '10 at 23:17
    
@RedFilter: Fixed the example to omit Table3 and note that all three columns are from one table. –  RHPT Aug 6 '10 at 3:22
    
@Justin: I can use DISTINCT, I just want to know if there's a better alternative. –  RHPT Aug 6 '10 at 3:26
show 1 more comment

6 Answers

GROUP BY is intended for aggregate function use; DISTINCT just removes duplicates (based on all column values matching on a per row basis) from visibility.

If TABLE2 allows duplicate values associated to TABLE1 records, you have to use either option. Depends on the data and what you want to see, but you could use a group by & aggregate function to get the highest (using MAX) or lowest (using MIN) values from TABLE2...

share|improve this answer
add comment

Nope, that's how it's done.

Although, you could try:

SELECT DISTINCT Table1.Col1, Table2.Col2
FROM Table1
INNER JOIN Table2 ON Table1.FK = Table2.ID AND Table2.Type = 1
WHERE Table1.Foo = 1865

Speed will depend on your data.

Also see http://stackoverflow.com/questions/426723/sql-group-by-versus-distinct

share|improve this answer
    
Moving the Table2.Type = 1 condition to the JOIN clause will make no difference in performance. –  Ryan Tenney Aug 5 '10 at 20:13
    
@Ryan W Tenney: But it can affect results returned, because when the criteria is on the JOIN, it occurs prior to. –  OMG Ponies Aug 5 '10 at 20:16
    
@OMG Ponies: No, it won't affect the results. Moving criteria between the on clause in a join and the where clause will only affect the results returned for outer joins, but not for inner joins. –  Shannon Severance Aug 5 '10 at 20:56
    
I think saying it will make no difference in performance is generalizing a bit. For simple queries I would agree, but it's worth testing it out and looking at the query plan. cftips.net/post.cfm/… –  Dan Williams Aug 6 '10 at 12:43
add comment

Have you tried creating an index on the fields you're selecting?

The relative costs of DISTINCT and GROUP BY make sense. One way of (and probably the way it's using) of processing the data is to sort the rows by the fields you provide. Then the difference between the two is that DISTINCT skips rows that are equal to the previous row, and GROUP by happens to run a count using the same metric of equality.

share|improve this answer
add comment

No, there's not, but if you're struggeling with performance on this, you might want to consider indexes. If you provide more details, maybe we can help with this

share|improve this answer
add comment

you could try moving the conditions in your 'where' to your joins, though I expect they'll be parsed the same.

If your trying to increase performance, add an index to Table1.Foo and Table2.Type

share|improve this answer
add comment
create table #temp (col1 int, col2 int, col3 int)
create index temp_index on #temp (col 1)

insert into #temp
SELECT Table1.Col1, Table2.Col1, Table1.Col3
FROM Table1 
INNER JOIN Table2 ON Table1.FK = Table2.ID
WHERE Table1.Foo = 1865 AND Table2.Type = 1

select distinct col1, col2, col3
from #temp
share|improve this answer
    
Welcome to stackoverflow! Thanks for contributing an answer. An explanation, even a small one, about your code will be very helpful to others in deciding whether it will be useful to them. –  LarsH Oct 24 '13 at 15:02
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.