Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I need to get all controls on a form that are of type x. I'm pretty sure I saw that code once in the past that used something like this:

dim ctrls() as Control
ctrls = Me.Controls(GetType(TextBox))

I know I can iterate over all controls getting children using a recursive function, but is there something easier or more straightforward, maybe like the following?

Dim Ctrls = From ctrl In Me.Controls Where ctrl.GetType Is Textbox
share|improve this question
1  
Related question: stackoverflow.com/questions/253937/… –  JYelton Aug 6 '10 at 15:37
add comment

12 Answers 12

up vote 62 down vote accepted

Here's another option for you. I tested it by creating a sample application, I then put a GroupBox and a GroupBox inside the initial GroupBox. Inside the nested GroupBox I put 3 TextBox controls and a button. This is the code I used (even includes the recursion you were looking for)

public IEnumerable<Control> GetAll(Control control,Type type)
{
    var controls = control.Controls.Cast<Control>();

    return controls.SelectMany(ctrl => GetAll(ctrl,type))
                              .Concat(controls)
                              .Where(c => c.GetType() == type);
}

To test it in the form load event I wanted a count of all controls inside the initial GroupBox

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var c = GetAll(this,typeof(TextBox));
    MessageBox.Show("Total Controls: " + c.Count());
}

And it returned the proper count each time, so I think this will work perfectly for what you're looking for :)

share|improve this answer
9  
GetAll() defined here is a very good candidate for an extension method to class Control –  michaelAngelo Feb 26 '12 at 18:34
    
I liked the way you used lambda expressions. Where to learn lambda expressions in detail? –  Aditya Bokade Jul 17 '13 at 8:10
    
You rock! This is brilliant! –  daniel Jun 12 at 22:38
add comment

In C# (since you tagged it as such) you could use a LINQ expression like this:

List<Control> c = Controls.OfType<TextBox>().Cast<Control>().ToList();

Edit for recursion:

In this example, you first create the list of controls and then call a method to populate it. Since the method is recursive, it doesn't return the list, it just updates it.

List<Control> ControlList = new List<Control>();
private void GetAllControls(Control container)
{
    foreach (Control c in container.Controls)
    {
        GetAllControls(c);
        if (c is TextBox) ControlList.Add(c);
    }
}

It may be possible to do this in one LINQ statement using the Descendants function, though I am not as familiar with it. See this page for more information on that.

Edit 2 to return a collection:

As @ProfK suggested, a method that simply returns the desired controls is probably better practice. To illustrate this I have modified the code as follows:

private IEnumerable<Control> GetAllTextBoxControls(Control container)
{
    List<Control> controlList = new List<Control>();
    foreach (Control c in container.Controls)
    {
        controlList.AddRange(GetAllTextBoxControls(c));
        if (c is TextBox)
            controlList.Add(c);
    }
    return controlList;
}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, C# or VB is fine for me. But the problems is that Controls.OfType<TExtbox> only returns the childs of the current control(in my case the Form), and I want in a single call to get ALL controls in the Forma "recursively" (chiilds, sub-childs, sub-sub-childs,.....) in asingle collection. –  Luis Aug 5 '10 at 23:41
    
I'll update the answer to be recursive. –  JYelton Aug 6 '10 at 15:17
    
I would expect a method called GetAllControls to return a collection of controls, which I would assign to ControlList. Just seems better practice. –  ProfK Oct 9 '12 at 6:20
    
@ProfK I agree with you; changing example accordingly. –  JYelton Oct 9 '12 at 15:45
add comment

This is an improved version of the recursive GetAllControls() that actually works on private vars:

    private void Test()
    {
         List<Control> allTextboxes = GetAllControls(this);
    }
    private List<Control> GetAllControls(Control container, List<Control> list)
    {
        foreach (Control c in container.Controls)
        {
            if (c is TextBox) list.Add(c);
            if (c.Controls.Count > 0)
                list = GetAllControls(c, list);
        }

        return list;
    }
    private List<Control> GetAllControls(Control container)
    {
        return GetAllControls(container, new List<Control>());
    }
share|improve this answer
add comment

You can use a LINQ query to do this. This will query everything on the form that is type TextBox

var c = from controls in this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>()
              select controls;
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, but the same problema as the ther answer, it only returns the chidls but not the subchilds, etc, and I want all ensted controls. I'm pretty sure I saw that it is posible with a single method call that is new in .NET 3.5 or 4.0, remember I saw that in a demo somewehre –  Luis Aug 5 '10 at 23:44
    
Ignoring the lack of recursion, wouldn't var c = this.Controls.OfType<TextBox>() give the same result? –  CoderDennis Aug 6 '10 at 18:13
1  
@Dennis: Yes it would, it's a matter of preference (usually). See stackoverflow.com/questions/214500/… for an interesting discussion on the matter. –  JYelton Aug 9 '10 at 15:58
add comment

I combined a bunch of the previous ideas into one extension method. The benefits here are that you get the correctly typed enumerable back, plus inheritance is handled correctly by OfType().

public static IEnumerable<T> FindAllChildrenByType<T>(this Control control)
{
    IEnumerable<Control> controls = control.Controls.Cast<Control>();
    return controls
        .OfType<T>()
        .Concat<T>(controls.SelectMany<Control, T>(ctrl => FindAllChildrenByType<T>(ctrl)));
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

It might be the ancient technique, but it works like charm. I used recursion to change the color of all labels of the control. It works great.

internal static void changeControlColour(Control f, Color color)
{
    foreach (Control c in f.Controls)
    {

        // MessageBox.Show(c.GetType().ToString());
        if (c.HasChildren)
        {
            changeControlColour(c, color);
        }
        else
            if (c is Label)
            {
                Label lll = (Label)c;
                lll.ForeColor = color;
            }
    }
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is the Solution.

http://stackoverflow.com/a/19224936/1147352

I have written this piece of code and selected only the panels, you can add more switches or ifs. in it

share|improve this answer
add comment

Don't forget that you can also have a TextBox within other controls other than container controls too. You can even add a TextBox to a PictureBox.

So you also need to check if

someControl.HasChildren = True

in any recursive function.

This is the result I had from a layout to test this code:

TextBox13   Parent = Panel5
TextBox12   Parent = Panel5
TextBox9   Parent = Panel2
TextBox8   Parent = Panel2
TextBox16   Parent = Panel6
TextBox15   Parent = Panel6
TextBox14   Parent = Panel6
TextBox10   Parent = Panel3
TextBox11   Parent = Panel4
TextBox7   Parent = Panel1
TextBox6   Parent = Panel1
TextBox5   Parent = Panel1
TextBox4   Parent = Form1
TextBox3   Parent = Form1
TextBox2   Parent = Form1
TextBox1   Parent = Form1
tbTest   Parent = myPicBox

Try this with one Button and one RichTextBox on a form.

Option Strict On
Option Explicit On
Option Infer Off

Public Class Form1

    Private Sub Button1_Click(ByVal sender As System.Object, ByVal e As System.EventArgs) Handles Button1.Click

        Dim pb As New PictureBox
        pb.Name = "myPicBox"
        pb.BackColor = Color.Goldenrod
        pb.Size = New Size(100, 100)
        pb.Location = New Point(0, 0)
        Dim tb As New TextBox
        tb.Name = "tbTest"
        pb.Controls.Add(tb)
        Me.Controls.Add(pb)

        Dim textBoxList As New List(Of Control)
        textBoxList = GetAllControls(Of TextBox)(Me)

        Dim sb As New System.Text.StringBuilder
        For index As Integer = 0 To textBoxList.Count - 1
            sb.Append(textBoxList.Item(index).Name & "   Parent = " & textBoxList.Item(index).Parent.Name & System.Environment.NewLine)
        Next

        RichTextBox1.Text = sb.ToString
    End Sub

    Private Function GetAllControls(Of T)(ByVal searchWithin As Control) As List(Of Control)

        Dim returnList As New List(Of Control)

        If searchWithin.HasChildren = True Then
            For Each ctrl As Control In searchWithin.Controls
                If TypeOf ctrl Is T Then
                    returnList.Add(ctrl)
                End If
                returnList.AddRange(GetAllControls(Of T)(ctrl))
            Next
        ElseIf searchWithin.HasChildren = False Then
            For Each ctrl As Control In searchWithin.Controls
                If TypeOf ctrl Is T Then
                    returnList.Add(ctrl)
                End If
                returnList.AddRange(GetAllControls(Of T)(ctrl))
            Next
        End If
        Return returnList
    End Function

End Class
share|improve this answer
add comment

I modified from @PsychoCoder. All controls could be found now (include nested).

public static IEnumerable<T> GetChildrens<T>(Control control)
{
  var type = typeof (T);

  var allControls = GetAllChildrens(control);

  return allControls.Where(c => c.GetType() == type).Cast<T>();
}

private static IEnumerable<Control> GetAllChildrens(Control control)
{
  var controls = control.Controls.Cast<Control>();
  return controls.SelectMany(c => GetAllChildrens(c))
    .Concat(controls);
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

This may work:

Public Function getControls(Of T)() As List(Of T)
    Dim st As New Stack(Of Control)
    Dim ctl As Control
    Dim li As New List(Of T)

    st.Push(Me)

    While st.Count > 0
        ctl = st.Pop
        For Each c In ctl.Controls
            st.Push(CType(c, Control))
            If c.GetType Is GetType(T) Then
                li.Add(CType(c, T))
            End If
        Next
    End While

    Return li
End Function

I think the function to get all controls you are talking about is only available to WPF.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Here is a tested and working generic solution:

I have a large number UpDownNumeric controls, some in the main form, some in groupboxes within the form. I want only the one last selected control to change back-color to green, for which I first set all others to white, using this method: (can also expand to grandchildren)

    public void setAllUpDnBackColorWhite()
    {
        //To set the numericUpDown background color of the selected control to white: 
        //and then the last selected control will change to green.

        foreach (Control cont in this.Controls)
        {
           if (cont.HasChildren)
            {
                foreach (Control contChild in cont.Controls)
                    if (contChild.GetType() == typeof(NumericUpDown))
                        contChild.BackColor = Color.White;
            }
            if (cont.GetType() == typeof(NumericUpDown))
                cont.BackColor = Color.White;
       }
    }   
share|improve this answer
add comment

I'd like to amend PsychoCoders answer: as the user wants to get all controls of a certain type we could use generics in the following way:

    public IEnumerable<T> FindControls<T>(Control control) where T : Control
    {
        // we can't cast here because some controls in here will most likely not be <T>
        var controls = control.Controls.Cast<Control>();

        return controls.SelectMany(ctrl => FindControls<T>(ctrl))
                                  .Concat(controls)
                                  .Where(c => c.GetType() == typeof(T)).Cast<T>();
    }

This way, we can call the function as follows:

private void Form1_Load(object sender, EventArgs e)
{
    var c = FindControls<TextBox>(this);
    MessageBox.Show("Total Controls: " + c.Count());
}
share|improve this answer
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.