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This is probably best explained through some code. I know that in the following example, the this inside the addEvent method is the current element contained in the array elements.

var testClass = new Class({
    testMethod: function() {
        var elements = $$('.elements');
        elements.addEvent('click', function() {
            console.log(this) //This will log the current element from elements
            });
        }
    });

I also know that in the following example, this instead refers to the class testClass because I have utilised the bind method.

var testClass = new Class({
    testMethod: function() {
        var elements = $$('.elements');
        elements.addEvent('click', function() {
            console.log(this); //This will log the class testClass
            }.bind(this));
        }
    });

My question, then, is how do I access both the class and the current element at the same time in addEvent?

Please note that if elements were not an array, this would not be problematic as I could pass elements as a parameter in the bind method. However, as it is an array, I cannot do this as it would simple give me an array of all the elements instead of the current element. Thanks!

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1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

You can provide an argument event argument to your event handler function, for example:

var TestClass = new Class({
  testMethod: function() {
    var elements = $$('.elements');
    elements.addEvent('click', function(e) {
      console.log(this);     // the object instance
      console.log(e.target); // <--- the HTML element
    }.bind(this));
  }
});

MooTools will pass a normalized event object as the e argument of your event handler function, there you can access the e.target property which will refer to the DOM element that triggered the event.

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Ah yes that does it! You legend! Thanks :). –  Rupert Madden-Abbott Aug 5 '10 at 23:07
1  
Note that e.target is not guaranteed to be an element in $$('.elements'). It may be a descendant child instead, since click bubbles. –  Crescent Fresh Aug 6 '10 at 2:03
    
@Crescent, yeah, I should be more explicit in my last line. Glad to see you back around :) –  CMS Aug 8 '10 at 2:04
    
to avoid the bubbling issue, your only guarantee is to fix it upriver - do the .each loop on the elements manually which will give you an element token you can refer to: elements.each(function(el) { el.addEvent('click', function(e) { console.log(el); }.bind(this); }, this); –  Dimitar Christoff Aug 27 '10 at 12:03

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