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I've got a dict that has a whole bunch of entries. I'm only interested in a select few of them. Is there an easy way to prune all the other ones out?

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8 Answers 8

up vote 115 down vote accepted

Constructing a new dict:

dict_you_want = { your_key: old_dict[your_key] for your_key in your_keys }

Uses dictionary comprehension.

If you use a version which lacks them (ie Python 2.6 and earlier), make it dict((your_key, old_dict[your_key]) for ...). It's the same, though uglier.

Note that this, unlike jnnnnn's version, has stable performance (depends only on number of your_keys) for old_dicts of any size. Both in terms of speed and memory. Since this is a generator expression, it processes one item at a time, and it doesn't looks through all items of old_dict.

Removing everything in-place:

unwanted = set(keys) - set(your_dict)
for unwanted_key in unwanted: del your_dict[unwanted_key]
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3  
Didn't know you could do dict-comprehensions too... nifty! This is a pretty nice solution. –  Mark Aug 6 '10 at 6:44
3  
"Uses dictionary comprehension, if you use a version which lacks them" == version <= 2.6 –  getekha Nov 10 '11 at 10:11
    
Throws a KeyError if one of the filer keys is not present in old_dict. I would suggest {k:d[k] for k in filter if k in d} –  Peter Gibson Jun 28 '12 at 1:53
    
@PeterGibson Yes, if that's part of the requirements, you need to do something about it. Whether it's silently dropping the keys, adding a default value, or something else, depends on what you are doing; there are plenty of use cases where your approach is wrong. There are also many where a key missing in old_dict indicates a bug elsewhere, and in that case I very much prefer an error to silently wrong results. –  delnan Jun 29 '12 at 17:12
2  
@PeterGibson It doesn't, dictionary lookup is O(1). –  delnan Jul 1 '12 at 10:48

Here's an example in python 2.6:

>>> a = {1:1, 2:2, 3:3}
>>> dict((key,value) for key, value in a.iteritems() if key == 1)
{1: 1}

The filtering part is the if statement.

This method is slower than delnan's answer if you only want to select a few of very many keys.

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3  
except I'd probably use if key in ('x','y','z') I guess. –  Mark Aug 6 '10 at 0:17

Given your original dictionary orig and the set of entries that you're interested in keys:

filtered = dict(zip(keys, [orig[k] for k in keys]))

which isn't as nice as delnan's answer, but should work in every Python version of interest. It is, however, fragile to each element of keys existing in your original dictionary.

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Well, this is basically an eager version of the "tuple generator version" of my dict comprehension. Very compatible indeed, though generator expressions were introduced in 2.4, spring 2005 - seriously, is anyone still using this? –  delnan Aug 6 '10 at 1:20
1  
I don't disagree; 2.3 really shouldn't exist anymore. However, as an outdated survey of 2.3 usage: moinmo.in/PollAboutRequiringPython24 Short version: RHEL4, SLES9, shipped with OS X 10.4 –  Kai Aug 6 '10 at 3:51

This function will do the trick:

def filter_dict(d, keys, invert=False):
    """ Filters a dict by only permitting certain keys. """
    if invert:
        key_set = set(d.keys()) - set(keys)
    else:
        key_set = set(keys) & set(d.keys())
    return { k: d[k] for k in key_set }

Just like delnan's version, this one uses dictionary comprehension and has stable performance for large dictionaries (dependent only on the number of keys you permit, and not the total number of keys in the dictionary).

And just like MyGGan's version, this one allows your list of keys to include keys that may not exist in the dictionary.

Further, when invert is set to True, the "keys" argument acts as "keys forbidden", rather than "keys allowed". Note that unlike delnan's version, the operation is not done in place, so the performance is related to the number of keys in the dictionary. However, the advantage of this is that the function will not modify the dictionary provided.

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You should allow keys to by any kind of iterable, like what set accepts. –  Mark Aug 3 '13 at 23:19
    
Ah, good call, thanks for pointing this out. I'll make that update. –  Ryan Aug 5 '13 at 2:51

Slightly more elegant dict comprehension:

foodict = {k: v for k, v in mydict.items() if k.startswith('foo')}
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Upvoted. I was thinking about adding an answer similar to this. Just out of curiosity though, why do {k:v for k,v in dict.items() ...} rather than {k:dict[k] for k in dict ...} Is there a performance difference? –  Hart Simha Jun 24 at 17:30
    
Answered my own question. The {k:dict[k] for k in dict ...} is about 20-25% faster, at least in Python 2.7.6, with a dictionary of 26 items (timeit(..., setup="d = {chr(x+97):x+1 for x in range(26)}")), depending on how many items are being filtered out (filtering out consonant keys is faster than filtering out vowel keys because you're looking up fewer items). The difference in performance may very well become less significant as your dictionary size grows. –  Hart Simha Jun 24 at 18:13

Based on the accepted answer by delnan.

What if one of your wanted keys aren't in the old_dict? The delnan solution will throw a KeyError exception that you can catch. If that's not what you need maybe you want to:

  1. only include keys that excists both in the old_dict and your set of wanted_keys.

    old_dict = {'name':"Foobar", 'baz':42}
    wanted_keys = ['name', 'age']
    new_dict = {k: old_dict[k] for k in set(wanted_keys) & set(old_dict.keys())}
    
    >>> new_dict
    {'name': 'Foobar'}
    
  2. have a default value for keys that's not set in old_dict.

    default = None
    new_dict = {k: old_dict[k] if k in old_dict else default for k in wanted_keys}
    
    >>> new_dict
    {'age': None, 'name': 'Foobar'}
    
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This one liner lambda should work:

dictfilt = lambda x, y: dict([ (i,x[i]) for i in x if i in y ])

my_dict = {"a":1,"b":2,"c":3,"d":4}
wanted_keys = ("c","d")

# run it
In [10]: dictfilt(my_dict, wanted_keys}
Out[10]: {'c': 3, 'd': 4}

It's a basic list comprehension iterating over your dict keys (i in x) and outputs a list of tuple (key,value) pairs if the key lives in your desired key list (y). A dict() wraps the whole thing to output as a dict object.

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Should use a set for wanted_keys, but otherwise looks good. –  Mark Nov 28 '13 at 2:35

You can do that with project function from funcy library:

from funcy import project
small_dict = project(big_dict, keys)

Also take a look at select_keys.

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