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I've been trying to come up with a copy constructor for a tree. I've found quite a few suggestions.

This one interested me.

class TreeNode
{
    int ascii;
    TreeNode* left;
    TreeNode* right;

public:
    TreeNode() { ascii = 0; left = right = 0; }
    TreeNode* clone();
    // ...
};

 TreeNode* TreeNode::clone()
    {
        if (TreeNode* tmp = new TreeNode)
        {
            tmp->ascii = ascii;
            if (left) tmp->left = left->clone();
            if (right) tmp->right = right->clone();
            return tmp;
        }
        return 0;
    }

What does "if (TreeNode* tmp = new TreeNode) mean?

Other than that it looks alright. It just doesn't work very well.

Any idea what's wrong with it?

The example above came from this site.

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2  
The if statement is checking that allocation succeeded, which since the introduction of exceptions is no longer needed in C++. See: freshsources.com/Except2/ALLISON.HTM –  pelotom Aug 6 '10 at 1:06
    
Note that a copy constructor for your class would have a signature like TreeNode(const TreeNode& source), and you'd operate directly on the new object, just like in any other constructor. See John's answer. –  John Flatness Aug 6 '10 at 1:10
1  
It also looks fine to me. In which fashion isn't it working very well? As others have pointed out, this implements a clone method, not a copy constructor. Is that the problem? Are you trying to use the class as if it had a copy constructor? It does, the default one, and the default one is wrong for this class. –  Omnifarious Aug 6 '10 at 2:32
    
Thanks for the replys. I learned much. Timo Geusch addressed the question very well. –  Peter Stewart Aug 6 '10 at 13:11

4 Answers 4

up vote 10 down vote accepted

Well, for starters it's not a copy constructor - the copy constructors have a very well defined syntax in C++, so a proper copy constructor would have the prototype TreeNode(TreeNode const &). Just to get the terminology right (and the compiler will still generate a copy constructor as it has no idea what the clone() function is supposed to do).

The expression in the if statement will both allocate a new TreeNode object and purports to check that the allocation succeeded (by checking that the resulting pointer isn't 0). Unfortunately that's pre-standard C++ and modern C++ implementations that are standard conforming will throw a std::bad_alloc exception instead, so the test will mainly give the user a warm fuzzy feeling that something is being done about memory allocation failure, even if it isn't.

In order to make the code work as expected on a standard-compliant compiler, you'll have to use nothrow new. From memory the line would read something like this:

if (TreeNode* tmp = new(std::nothrow) TreeNode)

All that said, unless TreeNode is part of an object hierarchy that relies on the presence of the clone() function I would do away with it and implement a proper C++ constructor instead. That way, the compiler and you are on the same page when it comes to duplicating objects, plus other programmers will find it a little easier to follow your code.

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I wouldn't call the method clone() a copy constructor. For example it is not a constructor in the first place just a method.

Implement a copy constructor in C++ like this (I left out all other members to keep it short):

class TreeNode {
    public:
       TreeNode(const TreeNode& source) {
          // copy members here, e.g.
          left = source.left;
          ...
       }
};

Edit: The example given implements/suggests a shallow copy. This is what the compiler creates for you if you didn't implement a copy constructor. So if you are happy with a shallow copy then you may as well leave out the copy constructor.

Of you prefer a deep copy this constructor may look as follows:

class TreeNode {
   public:
      TreeNode(const TreeNode& source) {
         left = source.left != NULL ? new TreeNode(*source.left) : NULL;
         ...
      }

By implementing the copy constructor you can also mix between deep-copy and shallow-copy if required.

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1  
Copy constructors in C++ should always deep-copy. –  Daniel Trebbien Aug 6 '10 at 1:14
    
This is a bad copy-ctor, since it messes up the ownership (basically it's equivalent to what the compiler does for you). Having clone(), you should do left = source.left->clone(), similarly for right. –  jpalecek Aug 6 '10 at 1:18
    
@Daniel: I think whether you want deep-copy depends on your requirements. @jpalecek: Yes, you are right. However, by overloading the copy constructor you can choose between shallow copy (what the compiler does) and deep copy (what you may want). Also you can choose between these options. @both: I'll update my answer to reflect your comments. Thanks for both of them! –  Manfred Aug 6 '10 at 1:35
    
Your distinction between "deep" and "shallow" copy doesn't really make sense in C++. A copy creates a logical copy of the object. End of story. There are no deep and shallow copies in C++, just correct and incorrect ones. –  jalf Aug 6 '10 at 2:28
1  
Additionally, this answer is an example of the wrong way to initialize members. Bjarne designed in the ctor-initializer-list for a reason. –  Ben Voigt Aug 6 '10 at 4:04

It's been a while but the if ( ) is checking if the the allocation is non-null. IE the "new" succeeded.

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What does if (TreeNode* tmp = new TreeNode) mean?

This is supposed to check the outcome of the allocation, ie. that it hasn't failed. However, this is a bad way of doing it, because:

  1. as others pointed out, new TreeNode will throw an exception in new C++ compilers
  2. Even if it hadn't thrown an exception, it is bad: when only some of the nodes fail to allocate, the caller of clone() won't have noticed anything, but will silently get only a part of the tree.
  3. when considering standard behaviour, this method is exception-unsafe.
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